Upcoming events and things to do in Asheville, NC. Below is a list of events for festivals, concerts, art exhibitions, group meetups and more.

Wednesday, May 25, 2022
“Oh The Places We’ve Been & The Places We’ll Go”
May 25 all-day
Asheville Gallery of Art

Claire Simpson Jones and Donny Luke are the Asheville Gallery of Art’s featured artists for the month of May. Visitors to the gallery will have the entire month to view their outstanding paintings. Their exhibit will run from May 1st-31st.

“This exhibition is a celebration of our individual travels through life,” joyously depicted in the watercolors of Donny Luke and Claire Simpson Jones. Traveling has always played a big part in both Donny and Claire’s world, broadening their awareness and perspective, opening their minds to new experiences, and providing unlimited inspiration.

Both artists have a passion for travel as well as a passion for the challenging, but gratifying, watercolor medium, and this exhibition combines these passions. “There is no better way to immerse yourself into a particular scene than painting. Whether choosing plein-air or painting from travel sketches and references brought back to the studio, all of our senses come to life and that experience is pure joy!” Every painting is an adventure that seems to take on a life of its own, often diverging from the initial design as it develops. Staying open to ‘following’ that direction or literally “going with the flow” of watercolor provides a sense of discovery and adventure that makes the process exciting. Donny and Claire both have a long list of places and techniques they plan to explore in the near future, adding to their repertoire of inspiration and work.

Donny Luke’s travels throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico, have given him many opportunities to take reference photos of some of the most beautiful places and landscapes in North America. He works from these references to create dramatic watercolor paintings. His work also includes many paintings of the breathtaking scenery and architecture in Western North Carolina, especially waterfalls, streams, and old barns.

Donny retired from a thirty-two year career as a professional architect in Asheville, NC and began his watercolor career in 2016. He has studied under nationally known watercolor artists including Michael Reardon, Iain Stewart, Keiko Tenabe, and Antonio Masi. He is a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina and has had paintings juried into the 2018, 2020, and 2021 WSNC Annual Juried Exhibitions with the 2020 painting ‘Santa Rosalina Relic’ receiving the WSNC Permanent Collection Purchase Award.

Claire Simpson Jones’ sensitive naturalist paintings draw from her many travels, here and abroad, and a lifetime of finding refuge and comfort in the raw beauty of our planet. In the past ten years, she has spent her summers in her favorite destinations’ England, Scotland, Australia, and our beautiful mountains of NC. Equipped with painting supplies, she roams the countryside, setting up to paint whenever inspiration comes her way. “Nature has always fed my soul for as long as I can remember. This connection has been, and continues to be, the primary inspiration for my paintings. I often begin with plein air studies and photos, taking them back to my studio to see where my next painting experience leads me. There is nothing to substitute for painting on location, with all of my senses alive, working quickly to capture the true essence of the scene before me.”

After working in graphic design, illustration, and a long career in teaching high school art, Claire has shifted her focus back to full time painting. She holds a BFA from Florida Atlantic University and has studied art at Ontario College of Art and California College of Art. She has also studied with nationally known watercolor artists including atelier workshops with the world renown watercolorist, Mary Whyte. Claire is a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina, earning awards, the most recent 2020 Best of Region Award.

Visitors to the Asheville Gallery of Art will be able to view Claire and Donny’s show from May1st through May 31st. They will be present for a special “Meet the Artist” event on First Friday, May 6th, from 5pm-8pm in the gallery at 82 Patton Avenue.

Asheville Regional Airport: New art exhibit highlighting local artists
May 25 all-day
Asheville Regional Airport

Journey, the newest exhibit showing in the airport art gallery, is open to the public now through June 26, 2022. The local art is unique, vibrant and engaging, and is displayed for the enjoyment of passengers and other visitors to the airport.
The local artists’ work featured in this exhibit focus on two different mediums. Hannah Hall’s pieces show a unique method of fiber artistry that captures a variety of outdoor landscapes. Cathleen Klibanoff uses mixed media by incorporating found objects, resin casts, acrylic and more to create vibrant seasonal expressions and a study of equine forms.
“The airport is a gateway to western North Carolina and it is wonderful to be able to introduce travelers to our region to a glimpse of local art culture,” said Alexandra Ingle, Brand and Experience Designer at AVL and curator of the gallery.
Artwork can be purchased from the gallery by emailing [email protected]. Details about the program and how to apply can be found on the airport’s website at flyavl.com.
Bearfootin’ Public Art Walk + Auction
May 25 all-day
Hendersonville nc

ince 2003, the Bearfootin’ Art Walk has helped raise funding for Downtown Hendersonville and a variety of local non-profits. In addition to raising funds, the bears offer a window into good work being done by community organizations in Henderson County.

The Bearfootin’ Bears arrive as blank slates before local artists transform each in a spectacular fashion, with creative themes ranging from Mona Lisa to Blue Ridge Mountain scenery. After the “Reveal” event in early May, the bears then take up residence in downtown Hendersonville for the duration of the summer and fall, up until auction. Participants bid during the auction to raise funds for local non-profits and Downtown Hendersonville. Winning bids up to $3,000 are split evenly between the downtown program and the nonprofit chosen by the sponsor, while bid amounts exceeding $3,000 are directed entirely to the non-profit. In 2021, the Bears raised more than $100,000, and in 2022 we hope to continue the tradition of giving.

 

International Photo Exhibit
May 25 all-day
Ramsey Library Blowers Gallery

The exhibit features thought-provoking photos taken by students, faculty, and staff while traveling abroad.


Accessibility

Find accessibility information for campus buildings at maps.unca.edu. For accessibility questions or to request event accommodations, please contact [email protected] or 828.250.3832.

Visitor Parking

Visitors must have a permit to park on campus — please visit the Transportation website to register.

Spring Photo Contest – “Trees in Bloom”
May 25 @ 12:00 am – 12:45 pm
Chimney Rock State Park

Image result for Chimney Rock Park

NC State Parks’ Year of the Tree continues with a celebration of spring trees. Break out your camera and capture the transformation of trees from winter to spring as they show off their gorgeous blooms throughout the next few months. You may even win a prize for your efforts!

GREAT PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO 3 WINNING ENTRIES

1st Prize: The winning photo will be our Facebook cover photo for two weeks, and the photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park, two boat tour tickets from Lake Lure Tours, and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

2nd Prize: After the first place photo, the second place photo will be our Facebook cover photo for one week. The photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

3rd Prize: The third place photographer will receive two adult day passes (or one family pack of day passes) to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

CONTEST RULES:

  1. There is no fee to enter the contest. All photographs must be taken of Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park only in areas accessible to guests between April 1, 2022 – May 31, 2022.
    The contest is open to amateur and professional photographers.
  2. Up to three photos per person can be submitted via any of the following ways to be eligible to win:
    • Facebook: First, like the Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park page. Next, send us a private message including your contact information specified in rule #3.
    • E-mail: If you don’t have access to social media, you may email your digital photo with your contact information specified in rule #3 to [email protected]
  3. Every entry should be clearly labeled with the photographer’s name, city & state, a brief photo caption, an email address and the best phone number to reach you.
  4. Photos should be available at a minimum resolution of 1200 x 1600 pixels (1 MB minimum) to be eligible to win. Photos taken via smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices are welcome if they meet minimum requirements.
  5. For entries showing human faces, you must list their name(s) and have written permission from any photographed person(s) to use their image.
  6. Entries should reflect the photographer’s interpretation of the theme. Emphasis will be placed on quality, composition and creativity. All entries may be used in promotions of Chimney Rock and park-related activities.
  7. Digital images can be optimized but not dramatically altered with photo editing software. Black and white photographs are welcome.
  8. Finalists will be chosen by Chimney Rock staff and the winner will be voted on by the public. Decisions regarding winners are final.

Winners will be notified personally and announced on Chimney Rock’s social media. For more information, call 1-828-625-9611, ext. 1812 or email us at [email protected].

THRIVE ! – an invitational exhibition of small works on paper
May 25 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
UNCA Owen Hall

Current students, alumni, staff, faculty, and faculty emeriti of the UNC Asheville Department of Art & Art History are participating in THRIVE ! – an invitational exhibition of small works on paper.

“I wanted to express this idea that despite COVID, and despite our department’s relocation during renovation – art thrives here, it is the constant that cannot be disrupted,” says THRIVE ! curator Leisa Rundquist, professor of art history and curator of art collections at UNC Asheville.

The informal arrangement installation will be displayed in the hallway gallery next to the S. Tucker Cooke Gallery in Owen Hall through August 1.

Viewing is available during open Owen Hall hours. 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM (M – F)

 

Community Expectations
As members of this community, we care about everyone. Faculty, staff, students, and visitors have a shared commitment to take the necessary precautions to avoid spreading COVID-19 while following all recommended health guidelines. Please see UNC Asheville’s Community Expectations. Be respectful of individual choice to wear or not wear a mask in any situation; wear a mask when and where encouraged, following guidelines and precautions outlined by the CDC.


Accessibility

Find accessibility information for campus buildings at maps.unca.edu. For accessibility questions or to request event accommodations, please contact [email protected] or 828.250.3832.

Visitor Parking

Visitors must have a permit to park on campus — please visit the Transportation website to register.

Earth’s Gifts | Focus Gallery Exhibition
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center

purple patchwork lap quilt

Featured Artists: Jude Stuecker (fiber) Erica Bailey (jewelry) Mary Dashiell (clay) Steve Miller (wood) Rex Redd (clay)

Floralia
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
North Carolina Glass Center
Image for Floralia

Floralia

Share this event:

From April 29 through June 20, 2022, North Carolina Glass Center will present Floralia, an exhibition to celebrate the birth of Spring. In ancient Rome, the celebration of Flora, the goddess of flowering plants, included games and festivities. Our seasonal show will capture the beauty of new beginnings with glass vessels, botanical sculpture and mixed media, all with a nature theme.

All displayed art is for sale. The purchase of art  from Floralia will support local artists and the nonprofit North Carolina Glass Center.

Open daily 10am-5pm. Closed Tuesdays. Free admission.

Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center
Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center
SETH CLARK SOLO EXHIBITION
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Momentum Gallery

Seth Clark, Factory

“My work focuses on deteriorating architecture. These structures, designed to be huge forces of permanence, are continually being challenged, destroyed and forgotten. I see an inherent honesty in the face of my subject. Among all of the clutter—the shards of wood and layers of rubble—there remains a gentle resolve. As I work, I study these structures incessantly. The buildings, often on the brink of ruin, have something very energized and present trying to escape from their fragmented reality.”  –Seth Clark

This first solo show of Seth’s work at Momentum’s new space features large-scale works from his BarnGhost, and Aerial View Series.  The collection also includes some of the artist’s sculptural objects in wood.  Abstract works, which still reference weathered architecture, such as Lath Study and Vinyl Study, round out the exhibition.

TOMMY SIMPSON SOLO EXHIBITION
May 25 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Momentum Gallery

Simpson is an imaginist who has worked in nearly every medium, including woodworking, painting, printmaking, ceramics, bookmaking, jewelry, and writing. Whether it’s a painting or sculptural object, in each of Simpson’s works there is an identifiable style that puzzles together the artist’s personal and cultural references into a signature blend of joyfulness and subtle commentary. On describing Simpson’s sensibility, Karen S. Chambers comments, “It’s whimsical and wry, naive yet saavy, inteligent but not cerebral.”  Edward S. Cooke, Jr. (Yale University) wrote, “Simpson is simply a maker who deftly blends utility, memory, irony, and spirituality in his accomplishments. Fundemental to his life has been a conviction that ‘art can be meaningful and still give joy.’ He makes faciful, whimsical objects that incorporate verbal and visual puns and probe the meanings of cultural icons, but undertakes such commentary wthin comfortable settings. His works possess an engaging tension that employs friendly humor or familiar details and conventions to inspire long-lasting thoughtfulness.”

The collection presented at Momentum spans the past 30 years, and focuses on Simpson’s sculptural furniture including cabinets, clocks, and benches, paintings, whimsical wood sculptures, pottery, and works on paper.  Tommy Simpson’s work is included in numerous public collections including the Renwick Gallery and the American Art Museum at the Smithsonian Institute, DC; and the Museum of Art and Design, NY.  

A Hand in Studio Craft: Harvey K. Littleton as Peer and Pioneer Exhibition
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Harvey K. Littleton, Amber Maze, 1968, blown glass, 8 3/4 × 10 1/2 × 6 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of Harvey K. Littleton.
Asheville, N.C.A Hand in Studio Craft: Harvey K. Littleton as Peer and Pioneer highlights recent gifts to the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection and loans from the family of glass artist Harvey K. Littleton. This exhibition places Harvey and Bess Littleton’s collection into the context of their lives, as they moved around the United States, connected with other artists, and developed their own work. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator—will be on view in the Judith S. Moore Gallery at the Museum from January 19 through June 27, 2022.

Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) founded the Studio Glass Movement in the United States in 1962 when, as a teacher, he instituted a glass art program at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, the first of its kind in the United States. He taught the next generation of glass artists—who taught the next—and his influence can still be seen today. But before he dedicated himself to the medium of glass, Littleton studied industrial design, ceramics, and metalwork at the University of Michigan and the Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1930s and early 1940s. He met his wife Bess Tamura Littleton, a painting student, at the University of Michigan. Over the course of their careers, Harvey and Bess collected artwork by their fellow artists and amassed an impressive collection from the early days of the Studio Glass Movement and the height of the American mid-century Studio Pottery Movement.

“This exhibition offers the viewer an exciting opportunity to see some of Harvey K. Littleton’s early work in ceramic and metal—directly from his family’s collection—before he began making art in glass,” says Whitney Richardson, associate curator. “Best known for his glassworks, those will be on display alongside the work of his students and his peers making clear the influence he had on them and the Studio Glass Movement.” 

Gillian Laub’s Southern Rites Exhibit
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Gillian Laub, Amber and Reggie, Mount Vernon, Georgia, 2011, inkjet print, 40 × 50 inches. © Gillian Laub, courtesy of Benrubi Gallery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American photographer Gillian Laub (born New York, 1975) has spent the last two decades investigating political conflicts, exploring family relationships, and challenging assumptions about cultural identity. In Southern Rites, Laub engages her skills as a photographer, filmmaker, and visual activist to examine the realities of racism and raise questions that are simultaneously painful and essential to understanding the American consciousness.

In 2002, Laub was sent on a magazine assignment to Mount Vernon, GA, to document the lives of teenagers in the American South. The town, nestled among fields of Vidalia onions, symbolized the archetype of pastoral, small town American life. The Montgomery County residents Laub encountered were warm, polite, protective of their neighbors, and proud of their history. Yet Laub learned that the joyful adolescent rites of passage celebrated in this rural countryside—high school homecomings and proms—were still racially segregated.

Laub continued to photograph Montgomery County over the following decade, returning even in the face of growing—and eventually violent—resistance from community members and local law enforcement. She documented a town held hostage by the racial tensions and inequities that scar much of the nation’s history. In 2009, a few months after Barack Obama’s first inauguration, Laub’s photographs of segregated proms were published in the New York Times Magazine. The story brought national attention to the town and the following year the proms were finally integrated. The power of her photographic images served as the catalyst and, for a moment, progress seemed inevitable.

Then, in early 2011, tragedy struck the town. Justin Patterson, a twenty-two-year-old unarmed African American man—whose segregated high school homecoming Laub had photographed—was shot and killed by a sixty-two-year-old white man. Laub’s project, which began as an exploration of segregated high school rituals, evolved into an urgent mandate to confront the painful realities of discrimination and structural racism. Laub continued to document the town over the following decade, during which the country re-elected its first African American president and the ubiquity of camera phones gave rise to citizen journalism exposing racially motivated violence. As the Black Lives Matter movement and national protests proliferated, Laub uncovered a complex story about adolescence, race, the legacy of slavery, and the deeply rooted practice of segregation in the American South.

Southern Rites is a specific story about 21st century young people in the American South, yet it poses a universal question about human experience: can a new generation liberate itself from a harrowing and traumatic past to create a different future?

Southern Rites is curated by Maya Benton and organized by the International Center of Photography.

In Living Color: At Home with Paint, Paper, and Thread
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Marquee Asheville D11

Image for In Living Color: At Home with Paint, Paper, and Thread

Brighten your walls with with works from Artsville Collective’s upcoming exhibition, “In Living Color: At Home with Paint, Paper and Thread.”  Allow these abstract pieces, in varying sizes and mediums, to light up your life. Collectively, the artwork’s tonal range is of blended neutrals and ventures into spring and fall palettes. Suit your design pleasures with pure color or wabi-sabi textural designs in a range of perspectives from three uniquely talented artists: Betsy Meyer, fibers; Karen Stastny, painting, and Michelle Wise, mixed media. Also showing: the Retro pop art of Daryl Slaton, which can be activated on your phone to reveal an animated story. For a softer approach, consider the mixed media art of Louise Glickman using paint, textiles, and natural plant materials.

Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton Exhibition
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
 
Left: Thermon Statom, Frankincense, 1999, siligraphy from glass plate with digital transfer on BFK Rives paper, edition 50/50, 36 1/4 × 29 3/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Thermon Statom. | Right: Dale Chihuly, Suite of Ten Prints: Chandelier, 1994, 4-color intaglio from glass plate on BRK Rives paper, edition 34/50, image: 29 ½ × 23 ½ inches, sheet: 36 × 29 ½ inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Dale Chihuly / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Asheville, N.C.—The selection of works from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection presented in Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton features imagery that recreates the sensation and colors of stained glass. The exhibition showcases Littleton and the range of makers who worked with him, including Dale Chihuly, Cynthia Bringle, Thermon Statom, and more. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator—will be on view in The Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery at the Museum from January 12 through May 23, 2022.

In 1974 Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) developed a process for using glass to create prints on paper. Littleton, who began as a ceramicist and became a leading figure in the American Studio Glass Movement, expanded his curiosity around the experimental potential of glass into innovations in the world of printmaking. A wide circle of artists in a variety of media—including glass, ceramics, and painting—were invited to Littleton’s studio in Spruce Pine, NC, to create prints using the vitreograph process developed by Littleton. Upending notions of both traditional glassmaking and printmaking, vitreographs innovatively combine the two into something new. The resulting prints created through a process of etched glass, ink, and paper create rich, colorful scenes reminiscent of luminous stained glass.

“Printmaking is a medium that many artists explore at some point in their career,” says Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. “The process is often collaborative, as they may find themselves working with a print studio and highly skilled printmaker. The medium can also be quite experimental. Harvey Littleton’s contribution to the field is very much so in this spirit, as seen in his incorporation of glass and his invitation to artists who might otherwise not have explored works on paper. Through this exhibition, we are able to appreciate how the artists bring their work in clay, glass, or paint to ink and paper.” 

The Wyeths: Three Generations | Works from the Bank of America Collection
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
N. C. Wyeth, Eight Bells (Clyde Stanley and Andrew Wyeth aboard Eight Bells), 1937, oil on hardboard, 20 × 30 inches. Bank of America Collection

The Wyeths: Three Generations | Works from the Bank of America Collection provides a comprehensive survey of works by N. C. Wyeth, one of America’s finest illustrators; his son, Andrew, an important realist painter; his eldest daughter, Henriette, a realist painter; and Andrew’s son Jamie, a popular portraitist. Through the works of these artists from three generations of the Wyeth family, themes of American history, artistic techniques, and creative achievements can be explored. This exhibition will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Explore Asheville Exhibition Hall February 12 through May 30, 2022.

N. C. Wyeth (1882–1945) has long been considered one of the nation’s leading illustrators. In the early 1900s, he studied with illustrator Howard Pyle in Delaware. In 1911, he built a house and studio in nearby Chadds Ford, PA. Later, he bought a sea captain’s house in Maine and in 1931 built a small studio, which he shared with his son, Andrew, and his daughters, Henriette and Carolyn. The exhibition includes illustrations for books by Robert Louis Stevenson and Washington Irving as well as historical scenes, seascapes, and landscapes.

Andrew Wyeth (1917–2009) is one of the United States’ most popular artists, and his paintings follow the American Realist tradition. He was influenced by the works of Winslow Homer, whose watercolor technique he admired, as well as by the art of Howard Pyle and his father, N. C. While Andrew painted recognizable images, his use of line and space often imbue his works with an underlying abstract quality. The exhibition includes important works from the 1970s and 1980s as well as recent paintings.

Henriette Wyeth (1907–1997) was the eldest daughter of N.C. Wyeth and an older sister to Andrew Wyeth. Like other members of her family, her painting style was realist in a time when Impressionism and Abstraction were popular in the early 20th century. She studied painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and was an acclaimed portraitist, though perhaps not as widely known as her father and brother. Most notably she painted the portrait of First Lady, Pat Nixon, which is in the collection of The White House.

Jamie Wyeth (born 1946), like his father and grandfather, paints subjects of everyday life, in particular the landscapes, animals, and people of Pennsylvania and Maine. In contrast to his father—who painted with watercolor, drybrush, and tempera—Jamie works in oil and mixed media, creating lush painterly surfaces. The 18 paintings in the exhibition represent all periods of his career.

This exhibition has been loaned through the Bank of America Art in our Communities® program.

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge
May 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Left to right: William Waldo Dodge Jr., Teapot, 1928, hammered silver and ebony, 8 × 5 3/4 × 9 1/2 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr. | William Waldo Dodge Jr., Lidded vegetable bowl, 1932, hammered silver, 6 × 6 5/8 × 6 5/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr.

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge features a selection of functional silver works by Dodge drawn from the Museum’s Collection. Organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator, this exhibition will be on view in the Debra McClinton Gallery at the Museum from February 23 through October 17, 2022.

William Waldo Dodge Jr. (Washington, DC 1895–1971 Asheville, NC) moved to Asheville in 1924 as a trained architect and a newly skilled silversmith. When he opened for business promoting his handwrought silver tableware, including plates, candlesticks, flatware (spoons, forks, and knives), and serving dishes, he did so in a true Arts and Crafts tradition. The aesthetics of the style were dictated by its philosophy: an artist’s handmade creation should reflect their hard work and skill, and the resulting artwork should highlight the material from which it was made. Dodge’s silver often displayed his hammer marks and inventive techniques, revealing the beauty of these useful household goods.

The Arts and Crafts style of England became popular in the United States in the early 1900s. Asheville was an early adopter of the movement because of the popularity and abundance of Arts and Crafts architecture in neighborhoods like Biltmore Forest, Biltmore Village, and the area around The Grove Park Inn. The title of this exhibition was taken from the famous quotation by one of the founding members of the English Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris, who said, “have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Not only did Dodge follow this suggestion; he contributed to American Arts and Crafts silver’s relevancy persisting almost halfway into the 20th century.

“It has been over 15 years since the Museum exhibited its collection of William Waldo Dodge silver and I am looking forward to displaying it in the new space with some new acquisitions added,” said Whitney Richardson, associate curator. Learn more at ashevilleart.org.

Thursday, May 26, 2022
“Oh The Places We’ve Been & The Places We’ll Go”
May 26 all-day
Asheville Gallery of Art

Claire Simpson Jones and Donny Luke are the Asheville Gallery of Art’s featured artists for the month of May. Visitors to the gallery will have the entire month to view their outstanding paintings. Their exhibit will run from May 1st-31st.

“This exhibition is a celebration of our individual travels through life,” joyously depicted in the watercolors of Donny Luke and Claire Simpson Jones. Traveling has always played a big part in both Donny and Claire’s world, broadening their awareness and perspective, opening their minds to new experiences, and providing unlimited inspiration.

Both artists have a passion for travel as well as a passion for the challenging, but gratifying, watercolor medium, and this exhibition combines these passions. “There is no better way to immerse yourself into a particular scene than painting. Whether choosing plein-air or painting from travel sketches and references brought back to the studio, all of our senses come to life and that experience is pure joy!” Every painting is an adventure that seems to take on a life of its own, often diverging from the initial design as it develops. Staying open to ‘following’ that direction or literally “going with the flow” of watercolor provides a sense of discovery and adventure that makes the process exciting. Donny and Claire both have a long list of places and techniques they plan to explore in the near future, adding to their repertoire of inspiration and work.

Donny Luke’s travels throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico, have given him many opportunities to take reference photos of some of the most beautiful places and landscapes in North America. He works from these references to create dramatic watercolor paintings. His work also includes many paintings of the breathtaking scenery and architecture in Western North Carolina, especially waterfalls, streams, and old barns.

Donny retired from a thirty-two year career as a professional architect in Asheville, NC and began his watercolor career in 2016. He has studied under nationally known watercolor artists including Michael Reardon, Iain Stewart, Keiko Tenabe, and Antonio Masi. He is a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina and has had paintings juried into the 2018, 2020, and 2021 WSNC Annual Juried Exhibitions with the 2020 painting ‘Santa Rosalina Relic’ receiving the WSNC Permanent Collection Purchase Award.

Claire Simpson Jones’ sensitive naturalist paintings draw from her many travels, here and abroad, and a lifetime of finding refuge and comfort in the raw beauty of our planet. In the past ten years, she has spent her summers in her favorite destinations’ England, Scotland, Australia, and our beautiful mountains of NC. Equipped with painting supplies, she roams the countryside, setting up to paint whenever inspiration comes her way. “Nature has always fed my soul for as long as I can remember. This connection has been, and continues to be, the primary inspiration for my paintings. I often begin with plein air studies and photos, taking them back to my studio to see where my next painting experience leads me. There is nothing to substitute for painting on location, with all of my senses alive, working quickly to capture the true essence of the scene before me.”

After working in graphic design, illustration, and a long career in teaching high school art, Claire has shifted her focus back to full time painting. She holds a BFA from Florida Atlantic University and has studied art at Ontario College of Art and California College of Art. She has also studied with nationally known watercolor artists including atelier workshops with the world renown watercolorist, Mary Whyte. Claire is a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina, earning awards, the most recent 2020 Best of Region Award.

Visitors to the Asheville Gallery of Art will be able to view Claire and Donny’s show from May1st through May 31st. They will be present for a special “Meet the Artist” event on First Friday, May 6th, from 5pm-8pm in the gallery at 82 Patton Avenue.

Asheville Regional Airport: New art exhibit highlighting local artists
May 26 all-day
Asheville Regional Airport

Journey, the newest exhibit showing in the airport art gallery, is open to the public now through June 26, 2022. The local art is unique, vibrant and engaging, and is displayed for the enjoyment of passengers and other visitors to the airport.
The local artists’ work featured in this exhibit focus on two different mediums. Hannah Hall’s pieces show a unique method of fiber artistry that captures a variety of outdoor landscapes. Cathleen Klibanoff uses mixed media by incorporating found objects, resin casts, acrylic and more to create vibrant seasonal expressions and a study of equine forms.
“The airport is a gateway to western North Carolina and it is wonderful to be able to introduce travelers to our region to a glimpse of local art culture,” said Alexandra Ingle, Brand and Experience Designer at AVL and curator of the gallery.
Artwork can be purchased from the gallery by emailing [email protected]. Details about the program and how to apply can be found on the airport’s website at flyavl.com.
Bearfootin’ Public Art Walk + Auction
May 26 all-day
Hendersonville nc

ince 2003, the Bearfootin’ Art Walk has helped raise funding for Downtown Hendersonville and a variety of local non-profits. In addition to raising funds, the bears offer a window into good work being done by community organizations in Henderson County.

The Bearfootin’ Bears arrive as blank slates before local artists transform each in a spectacular fashion, with creative themes ranging from Mona Lisa to Blue Ridge Mountain scenery. After the “Reveal” event in early May, the bears then take up residence in downtown Hendersonville for the duration of the summer and fall, up until auction. Participants bid during the auction to raise funds for local non-profits and Downtown Hendersonville. Winning bids up to $3,000 are split evenly between the downtown program and the nonprofit chosen by the sponsor, while bid amounts exceeding $3,000 are directed entirely to the non-profit. In 2021, the Bears raised more than $100,000, and in 2022 we hope to continue the tradition of giving.

 

International Photo Exhibit
May 26 all-day
Ramsey Library Blowers Gallery

The exhibit features thought-provoking photos taken by students, faculty, and staff while traveling abroad.


Accessibility

Find accessibility information for campus buildings at maps.unca.edu. For accessibility questions or to request event accommodations, please contact [email protected] or 828.250.3832.

Visitor Parking

Visitors must have a permit to park on campus — please visit the Transportation website to register.

Spring Photo Contest – “Trees in Bloom”
May 26 @ 12:00 am – 12:45 pm
Chimney Rock State Park

Image result for Chimney Rock Park

NC State Parks’ Year of the Tree continues with a celebration of spring trees. Break out your camera and capture the transformation of trees from winter to spring as they show off their gorgeous blooms throughout the next few months. You may even win a prize for your efforts!

GREAT PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO 3 WINNING ENTRIES

1st Prize: The winning photo will be our Facebook cover photo for two weeks, and the photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park, two boat tour tickets from Lake Lure Tours, and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

2nd Prize: After the first place photo, the second place photo will be our Facebook cover photo for one week. The photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

3rd Prize: The third place photographer will receive two adult day passes (or one family pack of day passes) to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

CONTEST RULES:

  1. There is no fee to enter the contest. All photographs must be taken of Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park only in areas accessible to guests between April 1, 2022 – May 31, 2022.
    The contest is open to amateur and professional photographers.
  2. Up to three photos per person can be submitted via any of the following ways to be eligible to win:
    • Facebook: First, like the Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park page. Next, send us a private message including your contact information specified in rule #3.
    • E-mail: If you don’t have access to social media, you may email your digital photo with your contact information specified in rule #3 to [email protected]
  3. Every entry should be clearly labeled with the photographer’s name, city & state, a brief photo caption, an email address and the best phone number to reach you.
  4. Photos should be available at a minimum resolution of 1200 x 1600 pixels (1 MB minimum) to be eligible to win. Photos taken via smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices are welcome if they meet minimum requirements.
  5. For entries showing human faces, you must list their name(s) and have written permission from any photographed person(s) to use their image.
  6. Entries should reflect the photographer’s interpretation of the theme. Emphasis will be placed on quality, composition and creativity. All entries may be used in promotions of Chimney Rock and park-related activities.
  7. Digital images can be optimized but not dramatically altered with photo editing software. Black and white photographs are welcome.
  8. Finalists will be chosen by Chimney Rock staff and the winner will be voted on by the public. Decisions regarding winners are final.

Winners will be notified personally and announced on Chimney Rock’s social media. For more information, call 1-828-625-9611, ext. 1812 or email us at [email protected].

THRIVE ! – an invitational exhibition of small works on paper
May 26 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
UNCA Owen Hall

Current students, alumni, staff, faculty, and faculty emeriti of the UNC Asheville Department of Art & Art History are participating in THRIVE ! – an invitational exhibition of small works on paper.

“I wanted to express this idea that despite COVID, and despite our department’s relocation during renovation – art thrives here, it is the constant that cannot be disrupted,” says THRIVE ! curator Leisa Rundquist, professor of art history and curator of art collections at UNC Asheville.

The informal arrangement installation will be displayed in the hallway gallery next to the S. Tucker Cooke Gallery in Owen Hall through August 1.

Viewing is available during open Owen Hall hours. 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM (M – F)

 

Community Expectations
As members of this community, we care about everyone. Faculty, staff, students, and visitors have a shared commitment to take the necessary precautions to avoid spreading COVID-19 while following all recommended health guidelines. Please see UNC Asheville’s Community Expectations. Be respectful of individual choice to wear or not wear a mask in any situation; wear a mask when and where encouraged, following guidelines and precautions outlined by the CDC.


Accessibility

Find accessibility information for campus buildings at maps.unca.edu. For accessibility questions or to request event accommodations, please contact [email protected] or 828.250.3832.

Visitor Parking

Visitors must have a permit to park on campus — please visit the Transportation website to register.

Earth’s Gifts | Focus Gallery Exhibition
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center

purple patchwork lap quilt

Featured Artists: Jude Stuecker (fiber) Erica Bailey (jewelry) Mary Dashiell (clay) Steve Miller (wood) Rex Redd (clay)

Floralia
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
North Carolina Glass Center
Image for Floralia

Floralia

Share this event:

From April 29 through June 20, 2022, North Carolina Glass Center will present Floralia, an exhibition to celebrate the birth of Spring. In ancient Rome, the celebration of Flora, the goddess of flowering plants, included games and festivities. Our seasonal show will capture the beauty of new beginnings with glass vessels, botanical sculpture and mixed media, all with a nature theme.

All displayed art is for sale. The purchase of art  from Floralia will support local artists and the nonprofit North Carolina Glass Center.

Open daily 10am-5pm. Closed Tuesdays. Free admission.

Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center
Haywood Community College’s Professional Crafts Program Graduate Exhibition
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center
SETH CLARK SOLO EXHIBITION
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Momentum Gallery

Seth Clark, Factory

“My work focuses on deteriorating architecture. These structures, designed to be huge forces of permanence, are continually being challenged, destroyed and forgotten. I see an inherent honesty in the face of my subject. Among all of the clutter—the shards of wood and layers of rubble—there remains a gentle resolve. As I work, I study these structures incessantly. The buildings, often on the brink of ruin, have something very energized and present trying to escape from their fragmented reality.”  –Seth Clark

This first solo show of Seth’s work at Momentum’s new space features large-scale works from his BarnGhost, and Aerial View Series.  The collection also includes some of the artist’s sculptural objects in wood.  Abstract works, which still reference weathered architecture, such as Lath Study and Vinyl Study, round out the exhibition.

TOMMY SIMPSON SOLO EXHIBITION
May 26 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Momentum Gallery

Simpson is an imaginist who has worked in nearly every medium, including woodworking, painting, printmaking, ceramics, bookmaking, jewelry, and writing. Whether it’s a painting or sculptural object, in each of Simpson’s works there is an identifiable style that puzzles together the artist’s personal and cultural references into a signature blend of joyfulness and subtle commentary. On describing Simpson’s sensibility, Karen S. Chambers comments, “It’s whimsical and wry, naive yet saavy, inteligent but not cerebral.”  Edward S. Cooke, Jr. (Yale University) wrote, “Simpson is simply a maker who deftly blends utility, memory, irony, and spirituality in his accomplishments. Fundemental to his life has been a conviction that ‘art can be meaningful and still give joy.’ He makes faciful, whimsical objects that incorporate verbal and visual puns and probe the meanings of cultural icons, but undertakes such commentary wthin comfortable settings. His works possess an engaging tension that employs friendly humor or familiar details and conventions to inspire long-lasting thoughtfulness.”

The collection presented at Momentum spans the past 30 years, and focuses on Simpson’s sculptural furniture including cabinets, clocks, and benches, paintings, whimsical wood sculptures, pottery, and works on paper.  Tommy Simpson’s work is included in numerous public collections including the Renwick Gallery and the American Art Museum at the Smithsonian Institute, DC; and the Museum of Art and Design, NY.