Upcoming events and things to do in Asheville, NC. Below is a list of events for festivals, concerts, art exhibitions, group meetups and more.

Saturday, July 31, 2021
2021 Annual Juried Exhibition Calling Visual Artists
Jul 31 all-day
Online w/ Artists Collective | Spartanburg

The prospectus for our 2021 Annual Juried Exhibition is now available for download.
Asheville Gallery of Art presents the July Artist of the month show: “Paintings as Pathways: Enjoying Nature Through Art” by artist Joyce Schlapkohl
Jul 31 all-day
Asheville Gallery of Art

Joyce Schlapkohl is the Asheville Gallery of Art’s featured artist for the month of July. Visitors to the gallery will have the entire month to view her landscape and floral oil paintings, all done in a style she describes as “painterly realism.” “Paintings as Pathways: Enjoying Nature Through Art” will open July 1st and run through July 31st.
Schlapkohl’s paintings focus on the beauty of nature and the special effects of light and shadow. She is continuously inspired by the natural offerings of Western North Carolina and paints the various native flora and fauna to delight both herself and the viewer. Schlapkohl’s paintings dance between realism and artful interpretation, demonstrating clear colors and composition but maintaining a painterly stroke. One of her oils, titled “Boating Party,” depicts a collection of canoes resting in a lazy river, the sun beaming through the canopy of leafy trees to create clear contrast of light and dark, the water is peaceful and reflects a portion of clear blue sky overhead. The mood is decidedly serene, evoking a warm, bright summer day. Other works, such as “Rick’s Roses,” showcase Schlapkohl’s love of color and texture, as the still life bursts with vivid roses in various shades of pink, all contained in a reflective glass vase.
Schlapkohl received a Master’s Degree in Business from the University of North Carolina and only started her art career after a back injury. She had always loved painting and enrolled in Florida Atlantic University to further her art education. Since then, she has continually taken workshops with nationally-known artists and pursued her passion for painting as a full-time artist. Schalopkohl says, “One wonderful part of painting is that you never stop learning and developing your eye for seeing.” She has taught watercolor classes over the years and was selected as a Signature Member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina. Since then, she has transitioned to painting in oils to better capture her style with added freedom and texture.
Viewers can see more than a dozen original oil paintings by Joyce Schlapkohl beginning July 1 and running through July 31st at the Asheville Gallery of Art. Joyce will be present for a special “Meet the Artist” event on First Friday, July 2nd, from 5pm-8pm. The gallery is open seven days a week, from 11am-6pm.

Call for Sculpture Artists – 35th Annual Sculpture Celebration
Jul 31 all-day
Broyhill Walking Park

The Caldwell Arts Council announces its 35th Annual Sculpture Celebration in Lenoir, NC on Saturday September 11, 2021 at the Broyhill Walking Park in Lenoir, North Carolina.

 

Sculptors are invited to bring up to 3 sculptures for this one-day event to compete for $11,000 in cash awards, along with potential sales and commissions. Registration includes free camping, a Friday Night Sculptors’ Dinner, breakfast, and a meal voucher for the day of the event.

 

This annual family-friendly event attracts sculptors and buyers from the eastern United States to Lenoir, North Carolina and in past years, has attracted over 4,000 people. It is funded in part by generous sponsors and by the North Carolina Arts Council, a division of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

Nominations for Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award
Jul 31 all-day
Online

NOMINATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE

2021 THOMAS WOLFE MEMORIAL LITERARY AWARD

The Western North Carolina Historical Association is now accepting nominations for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Originated by the Louis Lipinsky family and now supported by Michael Sartisky, PhD, the Award is a partnership between WNCHA and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee. It has been presented by WNCHA since 1955. The award comes with a $2,500 cash prize.

The deadline for submission of nominated works is July 31, 2021. Anyone with knowledge of an author who meets the qualification criteria may nominate the author for the award. To be considered, an entry must be a published work of fiction, nonfiction, drama or poetry and meet the following criteria:

  1. It must be a first edition work; revised editions of published works will not be considered for the Award.
  2. The publication date must be between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021.
  3. The author must be a native of western North Carolina or a resident of western North Carolina for at least twelve months prior to the closing date for the Award.
  4. An author may also qualify if the work submitted has a focus on or setting in western North Carolina.

 

Western North Carolina includes the Qualla Boundary and the following 25 counties: Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, and Yancey.

The Award Panel this year consists of: Catherine Frank, Chair, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville; Dee James, retired Director of the First-Year Writing Program at UNC Asheville; Tom Muir, Historic Site Manager, Thomas Wolfe Memorial; Gordon McKinney, PhD, former president, Appalachian Studies Association; Terry Roberts, PhD, Director, National Paideia Center; Jim Stokely, President, Wilma Dykeman Legacy.

Nomination letters must specify the following eligibility criteria:

  1. date of publication
  2. birthplace or residence of author
  3. setting of work

 

Nominators should submit a cover letter along with three copies of the work postmarked no later than July 31, 2021 to:

Wolfe Award Committee

℅ Anne Chesky Smith

WNC Historical Association

283 Victoria Road

Asheville, NC  28801

 

An awards ceremony and reception, in honor of the finalists and 2021 Award recipient, will be held in early December 2021.

The Association presented the first Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award to Wilma Dykeman in 1955 for The French Broad. The Award has continued to be funded, in part, by Mrs. E. Frank Edwin, a member of the Lipinsky family and for the last three years by WNCHA, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Board, both with support from Michael Sartisky, PhD. Other recipients of this prestigious Award include Robert Morgan, Gail Godwin, John Ehle, Robert Brunk, Michael McFee, Lee Smith, Ron Rash, Wayne Caldwell, and Terry Roberts. Sandra Muse Isaacs was the recipient of the 2020 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award for her book: Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and Its Cultural Continuance.

Stickwork by Patrick Dougherty at Biltmore Estate
Jul 31 all-day
Biltmore

Unique outdoor sculptural works by environmental artist Patrick Dougherty, known as “Stick Man,” will reside in Antler Hill Village. Renowned worldwide for his monumental creations, Dougherty weaves saplings and branches into intricate artworks, fashioning whimsical forms ranging from gigantic snares and cocoons to sculptural interpretations of notable buildings. The visual appeal of these large-scale artworks may be appreciated up close as guests are encouraged to walk through and around the creations, affording the opportunity to admire the artistry and technical skills required to make the sculptures.

Summer Photo Contest – “The Many Faces of Chimney Rock”
Jul 31 all-day
Chimney Rock State Park

Summer is all about outdoor fun, spending quality time together as a family and taking in the wonderful sights of nature. During this time of year, it’s easy to find many human faces in the Park, but you can also see other faces as well. Whether it’s faces of animals, faces in the rock formations, or even outlines of faces in the ground. Be sure to submit your best photo interpretation into our summer-themed “The Many Faces of Chimney Rock” Photo Contest. We’ll use the winning entries on our website and Facebook album, and you can win some fun prizes. Photos must be taken within the Chimney Rock section of the Park.

GREAT PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO 3 WINNING ENTRIES

CONTEST RULES:

  1. There is no fee to enter the contest. All photographs must be taken inside Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park only in areas accessible to guests between July 1, 2021 – July 31, 2021.
    The contest is open to amateur and professional photographers.
  2. Up to three photos per person can be submitted via any of the following ways to be eligible to win:
    1. Facebook: First, like the Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park page and share our photo contest post on your wall. Then post your photo to our wall with the photographer’s name and a brief caption (25-75 words) through your personal Facebook account. Next, send us a private message including your contact information specified in rule #3.
    2. Pinterest: First, re-pin our photo contest pin to one of your boards and follow our 2017 The Different Seasons of Chimney Rock Spring Photo Contest Board so we can easily contact you. Then pin your photo with the hashtags #chimneyrock AND #photocontest with your personal account, and include the photographer’s name and a brief caption (25-75 words).
    3. Twitter: First, follow Chimney Rock Park and retweet our tweet about the photo contest. Then tweet your photo to @ChimneyRockPark with the photographer’s name and the hashtag #photocontest. Next, send us private messages with your brief photo caption.
    4. E-mail: If you don’t have access to any social media sites listed above, you may email your digital photo with your contact information specified in rule #3 to [email protected].
    5. Snail Mail: Send your print photo with the clearly marked photographer’s name, city & state, a brief typed photo caption and a phone number to: Photo Contest, Chimney Rock Management LLC, PO Box 39, Chimney Rock, NC 28720.
  3. Every entry should be clearly labeled with the photographer’s name, city & state, a brief photo caption your photo of the Seasons of Chimney Rock, an email address and the best phone number to reach you.
  4. Photos should be available at a minimum resolution of 1200 x 1600 pixels (1 MB minimum) to be eligible to win. Photos taken via smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices are welcome if they meet minimum requirements.
  5. For entries showing human faces, you must list their name(s) and have written permission from any photographed person(s) to use their image.
  6. Entries should reflect the photographer’s interpretation of love at Chimney Rock. Emphasis will be placed on quality, composition and creativity. All entries may be used in promotions of Chimney Rock and park-related activities.
  7. Digital images can be optimized but not dramatically altered with photo editing software. Black and white photographs are welcome.
  8. Decisions of the judges are final.

Winners will be notified and announced on Chimney Rock’s social media channels. For more 

Wild Art Sculpture Showcase
Jul 31 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 pm
NC Arboretum

The North Carolina Arboretum is going wild for art and nature in 2021 with Wild Art! On view April 1 through September 26, this outdoor sculpture exhibition features works by 17 local and national artists drawing inspiration from the natural environment. Situated throughout the Arboretum’s spacious, open-air gardens, the show offers guests a doorway into the wild world from the comfort and safety of cultivated landscapes transformed by art.

The 18 sculptures on display represent a variety of approaches to the theme of “wild art,” from the literal to the abstract, and are crafted from a diverse array of materials that will delight and inspire. Let your imagination take you on a wild journey into the world of plants and animals near and far with Wild Art at The North Carolina Arboretum.

The exhibit is available to all guests during normal Arboretum hours, and there is no admission cost to view the sculptures beyond our usual parking fee of $16 per personal vehicle.

A Life in the Wild Art Exhibit
Jul 31 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
The North Carolina Arboretum

A Life in the Wild  features more than 30 large-format images from award-winning nature photographer Thomas D. Mangelsen, who has devoted decades of his life to documenting wild places across the globe and the remarkable creatures that inhabit them. For this traveling retrospective exhibition of his works, Mangelsen has hand-selected several legacy photographs from his portfolio of more than 40 years, during which time he has captured thousands of breathtaking images of wildlife under natural — and sometimes harsh — conditions. With subjects ranging from black bears in the Great Smoky Mountains to plains zebras in the savannas of East Africa, this collection of photographs serves to remind us all to slow down and take a moment to connect with nature near and far. Named the 2011 Conservation Photographer of the Year by Nature’s Best Photography, among other accolades, Mangelsen has his work featured in the permanent collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C..

A Life in the Wild is on display daily, May 15 – September 5, 2021, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. inside the Baker Exhibit Center. Face coverings are required for visitors ages 5 years and older.

Exhibit support for A Life in the Wild is provided in part by The North Carolina Arboretum SocietyAsheville Citizen-TimesBiltmore Farms HotelsGasperson Moving & StorageRomanticAsheville.com Travel Guide and Smoky Mountain Living Magazine

THOMAS D. MANGELSEN – A LIFE IN THE WILD, produced by David J. Wagner, L.L.C., David J. Wagner, Ph.D., Curator/Tour Director.

Biltmore: Stickwork by Patrick Dougherty
Jul 31 @ 9:30 am – 6:00 pm
Biltmore

Image result for Stickwork by Patrick Dougherty

Included with admission

A unique-to-Biltmore, large-scale outdoor sculpture will be crafted and installed in Antler Hill Village this spring by Patrick Dougherty. Over the last three decades, this internationally-acclaimed artist has combined his carpentry skills and love of nature to build over 300 of these wondrous works, captivating the hearts and imaginations of viewers worldwide.

Image: Close Ties (2006) Scottish Basketmakers Circle, Dingwall, Scotland. Photo: Fin Macrae
NOTE: This is an example of Patrick Dougherty’s work; the artist will create Biltmore’s unique structure in Antler Hill Village this spring.

Bead Embroidery | Live Demo
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Folk Art Center

Martine House will be demonstrating her bead embroidery techniques as she creates beautiful jewelry. She will be in the lobby of the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Call ahead for the latest updates: 828-298-7928.

Graduate Show 2021: Haywood Community College Professional Crafts Program
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center

Graduate Show 2021: Haywood Community College Professional Crafts Program

Magic is in the Air – Focus Gallery Exhibition
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Folk Art Center
white tiger sculpture

Magic is in the Air- May 1 – Aug. 3, 2021

1 Cindy Billingsley – clay
2 Sharon Gordon – wall textile
3 Jane Cole – quilts
4 Jeanne Rhodes – Moen – jewelry
5 Lisa Besler – leather

One Day I Will Disappear, a solo exhibition
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Bender Gallery

Bender Gallery is honored to present One Day I Will Disappear, a solo exhibition of current paintings by Czech American artist Tom Pazderka. His captivating work is deeply personal and is an elegant metaphor for life’s darker side: of landscape, of nature, of memory. The exhibition runs from July 3 through August 31 during regular business hours. There will be an opening reception for Pazderka on Saturday July 3, from 6 to 9 PM by RSVP only.

Pazderka is a painter, an installation artist, an intellectual, and a writer who spent his undergraduate years in the Asheville area. He was born near Prague in 1981 during the waning of the Communist era in Czechoslovakia. He lived in a panelák, a Soviet-style concrete apartment block, until emigrating to the US in 1994 at the age of twelve. Contrary to what we may envision in America, Pazderka has fond memories of his time there. Although life was basic and creativity was not encouraged, his family was never in need and they enjoyed regular visits to their family cottage in the country. However, most of Pazderka’s life has been lived in the US and he also considers himself American. His work and life are deeply influenced by what he describes as the “incompleteness of the immigrant experience”. Pazderka explores humanity’s quest for a universal truth. The work reflects his reverence for history and the failed Soviet promise of utopia of his native land. It is thus a balancing act between this history and his assimilation into the capitalist consumer culture of the United States.

The works shown in One Day I Will Disappear consist of oil, ash, and charcoal paintings on burned panel and paper. They feature clouds, mountains, portraits, ephemera, and remnants of nature. They are conceptually dark, yet haunting and beautiful at the same time. Pazderka uses humble materials such as found plywood panels that he burns with a torch before beginning the painting process. He transforms the painting surface with the destructive, yet creative power of fire. He states, “Materials and process are components of the work that are as important as the image and what the work is about”.

Pazderka chooses to work in a colorless palette reminiscent of aged black and white photographs. He explains, “Photographs interest me because it is a tangible memory, but photographs are really residue of the photographic process.”  They are themselves a memory of a memory. Much of Pazderka’s work is based on old family photographs and photos taken from nature and architecture relaying the past, the present, and the hope of a better future. The work appears otherworldly and fleeting, like ghosts of his memories. In Pazderka’s words, “The present is all there is in the end.”

Pazderka holds a BFA from Western Carolina University and an MFA from U.C. Santa Barbara. He has received many awards and fellowships and has held residencies in the US, France, and the Czech Republic. He lives and works in Ojai, CA.

ROLODEX. Craft a Conversation
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – Aug 20 @ 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

ROLODEX. Craft a Conversation is a growing index of self-identified Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) working in craft today. Initiated by Warren Wilson College’s MA in Critical Craft Studies during April 2021 in response to a nearly 70% increase in violence against AAPI communities, this project is centered on people, their descriptions of themselves, and their connections to craft – rather than on the objects they create.

Why focus on Asian American and Pacific Islanders working through craft? According to the Pew Research Center, Asian Americans are one of the fastest growing groups in the US since 2000. Despite nearly 23 million Asian Americans in the US population, a recent study by Leading Asian Americans to Unite for Change (LAAUNCH) found that 58% of people could not name a prominent Asian American.

The term “Asian American and Pacific Islander” is in question today. Drawing inspiration from the Black Power Movement, students at the University of California, Berkeley are credited with unifying pan-Asian groups under the term “Asian American” in the 1960s. This grouping deliberately rejected the outdated, geographically-based, and problematic term “Oriental.” In the 1980s, the U.S. Census expanded the category, combining Asian American and Pacific Islanders. Today, this governmentally-determined grouping feels too broad to many, as it includes more than 20 countries and thousands of Pacific Islands, each with unique histories, cultures, languages, and craft histories.

This project is a directory, an exhibition, and a tool:

How does research catalyze community, action, and visibility?

What conversations come next?

Two hundred people responded to the initial call and ROLODEX will continue to gather listings from the AAPI community until August 31, 2021. People built and continue to build this directory. Connecting is up to you. Access, use, and add to the directory by following this link: https://www.macraftstudieswwc.com/aapi.The project is online indefinitely and on view at the Center for Craft from June 4th to August 20th, 2021.

Suite Américaine
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – Sep 3 @ 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

The daughter, granddaughter, and sister of carpenters, artist and material culture scholar BA Harrington carries craft lineage into contemporary practice. Part of a growing, intersectional cohort of women-identifying woodworkers, Harrington learned her trade, like many before her, by reproducing furniture forms of the past. Her solo exhibition, Suite Américaine, holds a reverence for the history of American furnituremaking, but is inflected with a contemporary feminist imagination.

This body of work references late-seventeenth through early-nineteenth century dower chests, writing desks, and sewing tables, which were designed specifically for women but made by men. However, where these objects once stored and concealed the labor and craft skill of women, Harrington opens them. The six objects expose, activate, and celebrate their rich interiors, with linens and quilts spilling out of their wooden casings.

The use of French in the exhibition’s title, Suite Américaine, is a nod to the eighteenth century term for a furniture set and also allows the artist to feminize the word “American.” Similarly, the work on display acts as a feminist intervention on historic furniture. Harrington not only remakes the original forms with her own hands, asserting her technical skill, but also highlights the revolutionary potential of furniture to self-actualize the creative endeavors of women.

BA Harrington is the recipient of the Center for Craft’s inaugural Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. Each year this substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists who are revising, reclaiming, and advancing the history of craft through their work.

Sun Printing | Live Demo
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Folk Art Center

Fiber artist Sandy Rowland will be demonstrating how she creates wonderful silhouette-prints on fabric using special paints and the sun’s rays! She will be outside the main entrance to the Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Call ahead for the latest updates: 828-298-7928.

Tapestry Weaving Demo at the Moses Cone Manor
Jul 31 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Moses Cone Manor

Fiber artist and outdoor enthusiast Sandy Adair will be demonstrating the techniques she uses to create her large mountain landscapes.

This demonstration will be held on the front porch of the the Moses Cone Manor from 10am-4pm.

Visitors are encouraged to watch and ask questions while the demonstrators work and talk about their creative process!

Call ahead in the event of changes (828) 295-2049, or check our Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/shcgmosescone for updates.

Asheville Art Museum Announces Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – Aug 2 @ 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Lewis Hine, Powerhouse Mechanic, 1920–21, gelatin silver print, 10 × 7 ½ inches. Collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg. Courtesy art2art Circulating Exhibitions, LLC.
Asheville, N.C.Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine is a moving exhibition of 65 rare vintage or early prints surveying Lewis Hine’s life’s work documenting the travails and triumphs of immigration and labor. It culminates in his magnificent, oversized photographs of the construction of the Empire State Building in 1931. Our Strength Is Our People coincides with the complementary exhibition, Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection. Both exhibitions will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall May 7 through August 2, 2021.
Asheville Art Museum Presents Huffman Gifts of Contemporary Southern Folk Art
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Addie James, Big Mama Demp, 2002, acrylic and pen on foamcore, 20 × 16 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of Addie James.
Asheville, N.C.Huffman Gifts of Contemporary Southern Folk Art features gifts of contemporary southern folk art including paintings, ceramics, and more from the collection of Allen and Barry Huffman. The exhibition will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Judith S. Moore Gallery from April 7 through September 13, 2021.

Allen and Barry Huffman have been collecting contemporary southern folk art for the past 40 years. Both collectors are originally from the South, and their journey together has led them around the southeastern United States, from Florida to Alabama to their hometown of Hickory, NC. In each place, they formed bonds with regional artists and learned first-hand the narratives of each artwork. Within their collection are subsets of folk art, including self-taught artists driven to share their messages, crafts for the tourist market, and southern pottery. The guiding principle evident throughout their collection and the generous donation of contemporary southern folk art that they have gifted to the Asheville Art Museum is the story told by each of these artists through their artworks.

“The Asheville Art Museum is fortunate to have friends like the Huffmans; not only are they prolific collectors who have generously shared gifts with the Museum, but their knowledge about southern contemporary folk art and its artists enriches the region,” says Whitney Richardson, associate curator. “I have such respect for the curious nature with which Allen and Barry have approached adding each artwork to their collection. They formed a friendship with almost every artist they bought from and have a genuine interest in the stories being told by the art and its artist.”

Artists featured include Barry Gurley Huffman (GA, 1943–Present Hickory, NC), James Cook (Glen Alpine, NC 1934–1984 Lawndale, NC), Albert Hodge (Vale, NC 1941—Present Vale, NC), Howard Finster (Valley Mead, AL 1916–2001 Rome, GA), Addie James (SC 1943–2011 Statesville, NC), James Harold Jennings (Pinnacle, NC 1931–1999 Pinnacle, NC), LaVon Van Williams Jr. (Lakeland, FL 1958–Present Lexington, KY), and more.

This exhibition is organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator. For more information, visit ashevilleart.org/exhibitions/huffman-gifts-of-contemporary-southern-folk-art.

Asheville Art Museum Presents Olympics-Themed Exhibitions for Summer 2021
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Walter Iooss Jr., Carl Lewis, Houston, TX, 1991, archival pigment print on paper, 23 ¼ × 29 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Walter Iooss Jr.
Asheville, N.C.—The Asheville Art Museum is organizing a group of three exhibitions drawn from the Musem’s Collection in conjunction with the 2021 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. They will be on view in the Explore Asheville Exhibition Hall from July 9 through October 4, 2021.

“With these three exhibitions, the Asheville Art Museum is looking froward to bringing the Olympics to Asheville,” says Whitney Richardson, associate curator. “Athletes, sports fanatics, and those who enjoy art that captures the human athletic form will, I hope, all find something valuable in visiting these exhibitions. Some of the artworks are by renowned artists and some depict world-famous athletes, but it all speaks to the importance of the Olympics—and sports in general—in our lives and how we honor our athletes.”

Golden Hour: Olympians Photographed by Walter Iooss Jr. highlights dozens of photographer Walter Iooss Jr.’s images from the Museum’s Collection. Over his 60-year career, Iooss (Temple, TX 1943–Present NY) has captured portraits of hundreds of celebrated American athletes in action, and a select few as they prepared for the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. He began his career shooting for Sports Illustrated and has contributed to the magazine for more than 50 years.

Artistic Tribute: Representation of the Athlete pays homage to the historic Olympic tradition of including the arts as a competition. Until 1948, the modern Olympics included artistic representations of the athletes in painting and sculpture, among other media, as the ancient Olympics had done. This exhibition features artworks from the Museum’s Collection that follow this custom by artists including Robert Rauschenberg (Port Arthur, TX 1925–2008 Captiva, FL), Dox Thrash (Griffin, GA 1893–1965 Philadelphia, PA), Gerald van de Wiele (Detroit, MI 1932–Present New York, NY), Ward H. Nichols (Welch, WV 1930–Present NC), Marvin Lipofsky (Elgin, IL 1938–2016 Berkeley, CA), David Levinthal (San Francisco, CA 1949–Present New York, NY), and more.

Precious Medals: Gold, Silver & Bronze highlights works from the Museum’s Collection including glass, ceramic, fashion, and sculpture that use the same metals that are given to the top three placing athletes in an Olympic competition. The precious nature of these three metals is examined in relation to the artworks shown. Artists featured in this exhibition include Virginia Scotchie (Portsmouth, VA 1955–Present Columbia, SC), Mark Stanitz (1949–Present Northern California), William Waldo Dodge Jr. (Washington, D.C. 1895–1971 Asheville, NC), Richard Ritter (Detroit, MI 1940–Present Bakersville, NC), Jan Williams (Bucks County, PA–Present Bakersville, NC), and more.

These three exhibitions are organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator.

Old World/New Soil Art Exhibit
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Old World/New Soil

Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection

DATES:
May 7–August 2, 2021
LOCATION:
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

Inspired by Allen H. Eaton’s book from 1932, Immigrant Gifts to American Life: Some Experiments in Appreciation of the Contributions of Our Foreign-Born Citizens to American Culture, this exhibition focuses on those artists in the Asheville Art Museum Collection who were born outside of the United States of America. As an American art museum, the exhibition calls attention to the fact that we have decided to collect those artists who came to this country – either at their own prompting or out of necessity. As they adopted America as their new home, we have, in turn, embraced them, their creative output, and their artwork.

Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection is curated by Assistant Curator Whitney Richardson.

Old World/New Soil Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
René Pinchuk, Soliloquies, 1965, oil on canvas, 24 × 30 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © René Pinchuk.
Asheville, N.C.Old World/New Soil: Foreign-Born American Artists from the Asheville Art Museum Collection features ceramics, glass, paintings, sculptures, fiber art, and more. This exhibition coincides with Our Strength Is Our People: The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine. Both exhibitions will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall May 7 through August 2, 2021.

Inspired by the book Immigrant Gifts to American Life: Some Experiments in Appreciation of the Contributions of Our Foreign-Born Citizens to American Culture written in 1932 by Allen H. Eaton, a contemporary of Lewis Hine, the exhibition Old World/New Soil calls attention to the collection of works the Museum has acquired from artists who came to the United States either at their own prompting or out of necessity. Just as they adopted America as their new home, we have in turn embraced them, their creative output, and their artwork.

“This exhibition proudly displays artwork by those that chose the United States as their home but were not born here, in an American art museum,” says Whitney Richardson, associate curator. “I hope Old World/New Soil encourages visitors to not only see this country through the eyes of these artists, but also to appreciate the creativity they brought to us and shared. Many artists in this exhibition went on to teach in the US and influenced the next generation of Americans.”

Our Strength Is Our People Art Exhibit
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Sadie, a Cotton Mill Spinner, Lancaster, South Carolina

May 7–August 2, 2021

Our Strength Is Our People

The Humanist Photographs of Lewis Hine

DATES:
May 7–August 2, 2021
LOCATION:
Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall

This exhibition surveys the life’s work of Lewis Wickes Hine (1874–1940), the father of American documentary photography. Consisting entirely of rare vintage prints, it covers the three overarching themes of Hine’s three-decade career—the immigrant experience, child labor, and the American worker—and culminates in his magnificent studies of the construction of the Empire State Building.

Our Strength Is Our People is organized by art2art Circulating Exhibitions, LLC. All works are from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judith Hochberg.

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Public Domain: Photography and the Preservation of Public Lands Exhibition
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

11am–6pm. Late-night Thursdays until 9pm; closed Tuesdays.

Public Domain: Photography and the Preservation of Public Lands presents works drawn from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection by artists looking both regionally and nationally at lands that are either state or federally managed or have become so. This exhibition will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery May 19 through August 30, 2021. 

“The Asheville Art Museum’s growing collection of photography features a variety of artworks that consider humankind’s impact on our environment and world,” said Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. “The imagery featured in Public Domain reminds us of the critical role that artists play in environmental activism and preservation, affecting change at a range of levels”. 

Through images capturing the beauty, changes, and even devastation to the American landscape, photographers have played a vital role in advocating for the preservation of nature via the establishment and maintenance of state parks, national parks and monuments, and other federally protected lands. From George Masa and Timothy McCoy’s photographs of Great Smoky Mountains National Park to a selection of works from Robert Glenn Ketchum’s Overlooked in America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management series, these artworks provoke contemplation of both nature’s beauty and a calling to protect it. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the Bureau of Land Management whose mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 

Photographers include Robert Glenn Ketchum, George Masa, Timothy McCoy, Benjamin Porter, Sally Gall, and more. 

This exhibition is organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. 

Walter B. Stephen Pottery: Cameo to Crystalline
Jul 31 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Artist Walter B. Stephen (Clinton, IA 1875–1961 Asheville, NC) contributed to Western North Carolina’s identity as a flourishing site for pottery production and craftsmanship in the early 20th century. Walter B. Stephen Pottery: Cameo to Crystalline features art pottery and functional vessels from each stage of Stephen’s career, from his origins discovering the medium alongside his mother Nellie C. Randall Stephen in Shelby County, TN from 1901 through 1910 to his multi-decade production just outside of Asheville. This exhibition will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Debra McClinton Gallery July 28, 2021 through January 17, 2022.

In 1926, Stephen founded his third and last pottery studio, Pisgah Forest, in Arden, NC, which he operated until his death in 1961. It was at this studio that the artist perfected the “cameo” decoration technique for which he became best known. His hand-painted images, achieved with layers of white translucent clay, often feature American folk imagery, from covered wagons and livestock to cabins and spinning wheels. A selection of works from the Museum’s Collection showcase his innovation in form and in decorative surface details, including experimentation with crystalline glazing.

Adult Studio with Asheville Art Museum: Creative Travel Journaling
Jul 31 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

James Lancel McElhinney, Foster’s Raid-Battle of Kinston Bridge, 1996, mixed-media painting on paper, 48 1/4 × 48 1/4 inches. Gift of the Artist, 1996.11.20. © James Lancel McElhinney.

Registration deadline: July 23

Starting with our own beloved city of Asheville, observe, interpret, and sketch what you see around you! In this small-group/in-person workshop, learn the basics of perspective drawing and urban sketching; explore several approaches and styles of travel journaling; experiment with pen, ink, and watercolors; and take your sketchbook outdoors to begin a new journey.

As a professional art educator for over 30 years, instructor Claire Simpson Jones is passionate about sharing the experience of creating art with others. Working in multiple media and techniques, she holds an undergraduate degree in fine arts, a certification in commercial art, and is a National Board Certified teacher. She is a member of the Southern Watercolor Society and a signature member of the Watercolor Society of North Carolina.

Please note:

  • This Adult Studio is held indoors in the Museum’s John & Robyn Horn Education Center and outdoors, weather permitting.
  • Space is limited to small groups of up to 12 students; face coverings and social distancing are required.

ADULT STUDIO

The Museum’s studio program for adults offers a core curriculum in drawing, painting, printmaking, and three-dimensional media, and also explores the intersections between them. Local and visiting artists help students of all levels and abilities develop skills in media that reflect techniques and themes featured in the Museum’s Collection and special exhibitions. Classes meet for 3–12 weeks, and are designed for anyone interested in exploring specific media in depth; daylong workshops introduce new media or processes. To add your name to our Adult Studio mailing list, email Kristi McMillan, director of learning & engagement, or call 828.253.3227 x122.

Brother and The Hayes
Jul 31 @ 7:00 pm
Isis Music Hall

Brother (David Bingaman) and The Hayes (Jennie Hayes Kurtz) are siblings hailing from North Texas. Their love of the blues, country music, and bluegrass is the perfect vehicle for their playful and honest, story-driven songwriting. Jennie Hayes and David’s unique voices blend to form that classic blood harmony while maintaining their own character and strength. Their duets call to mind artists like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris and it’s easy to hear the influence of Doc Watson, Guy Clark, and John Prine in their songwriting. The two are greatly inspired by the power of place whether that be the suburbs of Dallas, Texas or a creekside in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

 

Come enjoy an evening of live music, food and drinks at the Isis Music Hall. Reservations are highly recommended.

This concert will also be Live Streamed from the Isis Music Hall Facebook Page

Sunday, August 1, 2021
Stickwork by Patrick Dougherty at Biltmore Estate
Aug 1 all-day
Biltmore

Unique outdoor sculptural works by environmental artist Patrick Dougherty, known as “Stick Man,” will reside in Antler Hill Village. Renowned worldwide for his monumental creations, Dougherty weaves saplings and branches into intricate artworks, fashioning whimsical forms ranging from gigantic snares and cocoons to sculptural interpretations of notable buildings. The visual appeal of these large-scale artworks may be appreciated up close as guests are encouraged to walk through and around the creations, affording the opportunity to admire the artistry and technical skills required to make the sculptures.

The Asheville Gallery of Art presents “The Nature of Summer,” a Group Show
Aug 1 – Aug 31 all-day
Asheville Gallery of Art

The Asheville Gallery of Art presents “The Nature of Summer,” a group show featuring 21 of the gallery artists opening August 1st and running through the end of the month.
Summer brings the spirit of adventure, bright colors, landscapes bursting with life, and extra time for travel, friends, and family. The sights and sounds of the Blue Ridge Mountains beckon tourists and locals alike, inviting discovery and exploration. In “The Nature of Summer,” AGA artists share the unique energy this season brings to them and their artwork.
The warm weather and lush foliage create the perfect opportunity for painters to embrace plein-air studies to capture light and color for their studio work. Karen Keil Brown shares the inspiration behind her oil painting “A Summer Morning Hike”: “For me an early morning trek in the Blue Ridge Mountains is the perfect outdoor activity. The cool air and the morning’s misty light create a beautiful vista for me to enjoy and paint.”
Terrilyn Dubreuil embraces experimentation in her “Hay Barn” piece, a soft pastel on heavily textured pumiced board. While barns are a familiar subject for landscape painters, Dubreuil takes it a step further with her vivid choices of color and unconventional mark-making, bringing energy to what can be an otherwise sedate subject matter.
Gallery artist Chris Bell invokes a sense of personal nostalgia for her contribution to the show. Bell says, “Growing up with no air conditioning, summer in WNC oftentimes meant middle-of-the-day escapades to escape the heat.” These journeys led her to many hidden gems in the mountains, including a meadow swaying with crimson flowers, as depicted in her mixed-media painting “Summertime Poppies.”
For a more domestic floral scene, viewers can admire the realism of Bill George’s watercolor “Antique Vase,” a delicate representation of roses from his previous New York garden arranged in his wife’s treasured vase. The play of live roses against the roses painted upon the vessel makes an intriguing composition that fully captures the beauty of these classic summer blooms.
And what is summer without a trip to the beach? Claire Simpson-Jones’ watercolor painting “Kiawah Island Sunrise” beckons the viewer’s eyes down a rustic boardwalk and towards the peaceful surf at daybreak. Simpson-Jones reflects on her idea of the nature of summer: “It begins with a warm glow as it brings to mind the soothing sound of ocean waves and spectacular sunrises.”
Visitors to Asheville Gallery of Art can see these paintings and over a dozen more for the entirety of August. On Friday, August 6th from 5-8 pm, there will be an artists’ meet-and-greet with many of gallery artists in attendance. The gallery is open seven days a week, 11am-6pm.

Wild Art Sculpture Showcase
Aug 1 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 pm
NC Arboretum

The North Carolina Arboretum is going wild for art and nature in 2021 with Wild Art! On view April 1 through September 26, this outdoor sculpture exhibition features works by 17 local and national artists drawing inspiration from the natural environment. Situated throughout the Arboretum’s spacious, open-air gardens, the show offers guests a doorway into the wild world from the comfort and safety of cultivated landscapes transformed by art.

The 18 sculptures on display represent a variety of approaches to the theme of “wild art,” from the literal to the abstract, and are crafted from a diverse array of materials that will delight and inspire. Let your imagination take you on a wild journey into the world of plants and animals near and far with Wild Art at The North Carolina Arboretum.

The exhibit is available to all guests during normal Arboretum hours, and there is no admission cost to view the sculptures beyond our usual parking fee of $16 per personal vehicle.