Upcoming events and things to do in Asheville, NC. Below is a list of events for festivals, concerts, art exhibitions, group meetups and more.

Wednesday, October 5, 2022
Artist Support Grant
Oct 5 all-day
online

The Artist Support Grant provides funding emerging or established artists to create work, improve their business operations, or bring their work to new audiences. Grants range from $500-3,000.

Arts Build Community Grant
Oct 5 all-day
online

The Arts Build Community grant supports innovative, arts-based projects that inspire diverse groups of participants to be more active, involved, and civically-engaged by creating together. Grants range from $1,000-2,500.

Bearfootin’ Public Art Walk + Auction
Oct 5 all-day
Hendersonville nc

ince 2003, the Bearfootin’ Art Walk has helped raise funding for Downtown Hendersonville and a variety of local non-profits. In addition to raising funds, the bears offer a window into good work being done by community organizations in Henderson County.

The Bearfootin’ Bears arrive as blank slates before local artists transform each in a spectacular fashion, with creative themes ranging from Mona Lisa to Blue Ridge Mountain scenery. After the “Reveal” event in early May, the bears then take up residence in downtown Hendersonville for the duration of the summer and fall, up until auction. Participants bid during the auction to raise funds for local non-profits and Downtown Hendersonville. Winning bids up to $3,000 are split evenly between the downtown program and the nonprofit chosen by the sponsor, while bid amounts exceeding $3,000 are directed entirely to the non-profit. In 2021, the Bears raised more than $100,000, and in 2022 we hope to continue the tradition of giving.

 

Biltmore: Legends of Art + Innovation
Oct 5 all-day
Biltmore Estate

Immerse yourself in Legends of Art & Innovation at Biltmore—featuring three
different large-scale, multi-sensory experiences—created and produced by Grande Experiences using the very latest in
immersive technology to illuminate the remarkable lives of Van Gogh, Monet, and Da Vinci and their timeless masterpieces of art
and design, Included with the cost of admission, Reservations required

“Life Art Life” William Bernstein 50 Year Art Retrospective
Oct 5 @ 10:30 am – 5:00 pm
Toe River Arts, Kokol Gallery

“LIFE ART LIFE William Bernstein 50 year retrospective” exhibition August 6-October 9, 2022 at the Toe River Arts’ Kokol Gallery, Spruce Pine, NC, features the paintings and glass of this artist who has been on the forefront of the studio glass movement.

Graduating 1968 from the Philadelphia College of Arts and just married, Bernstein moved to Penland School of Crafts to be their second glass resident artist from 1968-70. He was a co-founder of the Glass Arts Society (GAS) that formed to bring together the glass community so people could work together and learn from each other. Receiving numerous awards, fellowships and grants, he has exhibited internationally and has artwork in many private and public collections. Bernstein has lived most of his professional life in the rural Celo community of Yancey, North Carolina along with his family and artist wife, Katherine Bernstin. This retrospective provides a great opportunity for one to imagine a life surrounded by art.

This has been not only been a year-long process of curating pieces for an exhibit, but a lifetime of making art that connects with all things about one’s life. Bernstein’s work in glass and paint showcases just that: his family, his pets, friends, his environs, his moods and so much more. A life well-lived in creating art. More on Bernstein Glass www.bernsteinglass.com

William Warmus (A Fellow and former curator of Modern Glass at the Corning Museum), writes for the exhibition catalog, “Bernstein is a minimalist whose style is based upon the dedication to the concepts of honesty, modesty, and humility. It has a feel of its surroundings and of the people of the region.”

The Toe River Arts Kokol Gallery is located at 269 Oak Avenue, Spruce Pine, NC 28777. The exhibition dates: August 6 – October 9, 2022. Hours: Tuesdays-Saturdays from 10:30 – 5:00 pm. 828-765-0520, www.toeriverarts.org

Public receptions on Fridays: August 12 and October 7, both 5:00-7:00 PM. Artist gallery talk Friday, August 12, 4:00 pm. The exhibition travels to Cary Arts Center November 30 – January 21, 2023.

Coinciding with the United Nations’ Year 2022 as the Year of Glass and the 60th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, this has been made possible by Toe River Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Cary Art Center, Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass, the Blumenthal Foundation, and Mountain Electronics in Micaville, NC.

Asheville Gallery of Art October Show: “Nature’s Gems”, featuring artist Judy Rentner
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Gallery of Art

Asheville Gallery of Art presents Judy Rentner’s rich, colorful paintings, during the month of October, in an exhibition titled ‘Nature’s Gems’. The opening reception will be held on Friday, October 7th from 5:00-8:00pm.

Of all of the seasons of the year, fall is the crescendo, the last burst of beauty before nature’s tones soften and become quiet in the winter months. Autumn colors are like precious gems: topaz, sapphires, emeralds, rubies…, an endless sparkling array of brilliance. Although an artist cannot compete with God’s creations, she can capture the awe-inspiring essence of a moment in time to share with her viewers. Judy is such an artist.

Judy Rentner has been painting the landscapes of Western North Carolina for 23 years and they continue to inspire her. Having lived in 10 different states from coast to coast, she still considers North Carolina one of the most beautiful. Although she has been painting most of her adult life, it was here that she found her creative style. Painting in oils, with a palette knife, enabled her to achieve the essence of a scene in light and color. Everything about the creative process is personal and many viewers find themselves drawn to Judy’s unique, inviting style.

A graduate of Ohio University, Judy Rentner did not pursue art until years later when she took workshops, in watercolor, from various artists. This was a pivotal time of discovery as she learned the skills needed to express her ideas in paint. She then experimented with different mediums producing work that was both realistic and abstract. Moving to North Carolina, she placed her work in galleries and taught classes in watercolor, acrylic, and oil. Currently, her passion lies in painting landscapes, with a palette knife, in oils. This technique has given her freedom of expression, using color to its fullest extent.

Judy’s work is represented in several galleries. Check out her website at www.judyrentner.com and be sure to drop by Asheville Gallery of Art this October to view her outstanding autumn paintings. The gallery is open from 11:00am until 6:00pm Monday through Sunday.

Her Painting Titles and writeup:

1. “Crossing into light”….My daughter, a photographer, went to Duke Gardens to “chase the light”. Normally I paint from my own sketches and photos, but this was so striking a scene, that it inspired me to capture it in oil.

2. “Sun Rise in the Mountains” was a combination of many scenes I have painted in our beautiful Smokey Mountains.

3 “Fall Treasure” This is a scene I captured in the Smokey Mountain National Park. Almost every fall I drive through the mountains of Western North Carolina searching for the right landscape. I do not have to go far as this is a painter’s paradise.

Border Cantos | Sonic Border Art Exhibition
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Richard Misrach, Wall, Jacumba, California, 2009, pigment print, 60 × 80 inches. Courtesy the Artist. © Richard Misrach, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco..
Border Cantos | Sonic Border, a unique collaboration between American photographer Richard Misrach and Mexican American sculptor and composer Guillermo Galindo, uses the power of art to explore and humanize the complex issues surrounding the Mexican-American border. Organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the transformative and multi-sensory experience will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall from July 22 through October 24, 2022.

Misrach, who has photographed the border since 2004, beautifully captures landscapes and objects, including things left behind by migrants. His large-scale photographs, along with grids of smaller photos, highlight issues surrounding migration and its effect on regions and people, and also introduce a complicated look at policing the boundary.

Responding to these photographs, Galindo fashioned sound-generating sculptures from items Misrach collected along the border, such as water bottles, Border Patrol “drag tires,” spent shotgun shells, ladders, and sections of the border wall itself. The sounds they produce give voices to people through the personal belongings they have left behind. The composition embraces the Pre-Columbian belief that there was an intimate connection between an instrument and the material from which it was made, with no separation between spiritual and physical worlds. Based on the Mesoamerican Venus calendar, Sonic Border plays for a total of 260 minutes and is separated into 13 cycles of 20 minutes. Within these cycles, the instruments play in small groups of two or more, or all together as an orchestra.

Presented in English and Spanish, Border Cantos | Sonic Border offers perspective on the challenges of migration, inviting us to bridge boundaries. When experienced as a whole, the images, instruments, and emanating sounds create an immersive space in which to look, listen, and learn about the complicated issues surrounding the Mexican-American border. While the artists do not seek to provide solutions to these issues, they do provide insight into a place where most people have never ventured, creating a poignant connection that draws on our humanity.

Border Cantos | Sonic Border is organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Support for the national tour of Border Cantos | Sonic Border is provided by Art Bridges.

Learn more at ashevilleart.org.

Draped and Veiled Art Exhibit
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Draped and Veiled: 20×24 Polaroid Photographs by Joyce Tenneson showcases Joyce Tenneson’s Transformations series, which she began in 1985 and engaged with through 2005. Transformations features partially or fully nude figures poetically presented; Tenneson’s photographs have always been interested in the magic of the human figure, contained within bodies of all ages and emotions in a broad range that are both vulnerable and bold. This exhibition features 12 large Polaroids from the poetic series. Draped and Veiled will be on view May 25–October 10, 2022.
Georgia Deal + Tom Ashcraft: Uncharted
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Tracey Morgan Gallery

Tracey Morgan Gallery is pleased to present Uncharted, a joint exhibition by multiple-disciplinary artists Georgia Deal and Tom Ashcraft. Incorporating both individual and collaborative works, the exhibition will in-clude wooden and cast bronze boat sculptures, prints on hand-made paper, and photographs, all centered around ideas of physical and psychological transitions.

The isolation of the pandemic and the ensuing global geo-political tumult compelled Deal and Ashcraft to re-examine their studio practices. The individual and collaborative works in this exhibition reference a liminal space, that transitional point between “what was” and “what’s next.”

For Deal, the pandemic afforded time to examine ideas of solitude and anticipation and her work echoes the imagery brought on by that period of stasis. Ashcraft’s sculptures, selected versions from his collection of 200+ handmade wooden boats, gather ideas of migration, observation, scale, and object-making. Their col-laborative piece, Uncharted, undertakes these overlapping themes, dealing with both the psychic and antici-patory nature of movement, especially when that movement is only possible through imagination

Deal and Ashcraft each conduct significant individual studio practices and have been committed to the ethic of collaborative art for over 35 years. They are core members of Workingman Collective, founded in 2005 as a cooperative group of artists and other professionals whose membership and objectives evolve to fit each new project. They are interested in process, invention, chance, and the public.

Georgia Deal is Professor Emeritus and former Chair of the Printmaking and Papermaking Program at the Corcoran School of Art & Design of George Washington University in Washington DC. Her work is in multiple collections including the Philadelphia Museum, the Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and Yale University Library. She currently lives in Asheville, NC and is proprietor of the papermaking studio, Swannanoa Paper.

Tom Ashcraft’s diverse practice is rooted in object-making, public and participatory artwork. He and Work-ingman Collective have exhibited and produced work in the U.S., Europe, the Caribbean and Africa. Awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Design Grant and a Ford Foundation Fellowship, among others. He recently completed a student / artist collaborative work “Public Practice” which was a three-year course focused on creating two permanent artworks for the US Embassy in Niamey, Niger, commissioned by Art in Embassies, US Department of State. Ashcraft is currently based in Asheville, North Carolina and is the MFA Director and Distinguished Professor at the School of Art + Design, Western Carolina University.

Rebel/Re-Belle: Exploring Gender, Agency, and Identity | Selections from the Asheville Art Museum and Rubell Museum
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Wednesday through Monday from 11am to 6pm
Corn Wagon Thunder, Laundromat from the Wonder series, 2017. Archival print on Epson Ultra Premium Presentation matte paper, 10 × 15 inches, Asheville Art Museum. © Corn Wagon Thunder.

Rebel/Re-Belle: Exploring Gender, Agency, and Identity Selections from the Asheville Art Museum and Rubell Museum combines works, primarily created by women, from two significant collections of contemporary art to explore how artists have innovated, influenced, interrogated, and inspired visual culture in the past 100 years.

Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton Exhibition
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
 
Left: Thermon Statom, Frankincense, 1999, siligraphy from glass plate with digital transfer on BFK Rives paper, edition 50/50, 36 1/4 × 29 3/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Thermon Statom. | Right: Dale Chihuly, Suite of Ten Prints: Chandelier, 1994, 4-color intaglio from glass plate on BRK Rives paper, edition 34/50, image: 29 ½ × 23 ½ inches, sheet: 36 × 29 ½ inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Dale Chihuly / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Asheville, N.C.—The selection of works from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection presented in Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton features imagery that recreates the sensation and colors of stained glass. The exhibition showcases Littleton and the range of makers who worked with him, including Dale Chihuly, Cynthia Bringle, Thermon Statom, and more. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator—will be on view in The Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery at the Museum from January 12 through May 23, 2022.

In 1974 Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) developed a process for using glass to create prints on paper. Littleton, who began as a ceramicist and became a leading figure in the American Studio Glass Movement, expanded his curiosity around the experimental potential of glass into innovations in the world of printmaking. A wide circle of artists in a variety of media—including glass, ceramics, and painting—were invited to Littleton’s studio in Spruce Pine, NC, to create prints using the vitreograph process developed by Littleton. Upending notions of both traditional glassmaking and printmaking, vitreographs innovatively combine the two into something new. The resulting prints created through a process of etched glass, ink, and paper create rich, colorful scenes reminiscent of luminous stained glass.

“Printmaking is a medium that many artists explore at some point in their career,” says Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. “The process is often collaborative, as they may find themselves working with a print studio and highly skilled printmaker. The medium can also be quite experimental. Harvey Littleton’s contribution to the field is very much so in this spirit, as seen in his incorporation of glass and his invitation to artists who might otherwise not have explored works on paper. Through this exhibition, we are able to appreciate how the artists bring their work in clay, glass, or paint to ink and paper.” 

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge
Oct 5 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Left to right: William Waldo Dodge Jr., Teapot, 1928, hammered silver and ebony, 8 × 5 3/4 × 9 1/2 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr. | William Waldo Dodge Jr., Lidded vegetable bowl, 1932, hammered silver, 6 × 6 5/8 × 6 5/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr.

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge features a selection of functional silver works by Dodge drawn from the Museum’s Collection. Organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator, this exhibition will be on view in the Debra McClinton Gallery at the Museum from February 23 through October 17, 2022.

William Waldo Dodge Jr. (Washington, DC 1895–1971 Asheville, NC) moved to Asheville in 1924 as a trained architect and a newly skilled silversmith. When he opened for business promoting his handwrought silver tableware, including plates, candlesticks, flatware (spoons, forks, and knives), and serving dishes, he did so in a true Arts and Crafts tradition. The aesthetics of the style were dictated by its philosophy: an artist’s handmade creation should reflect their hard work and skill, and the resulting artwork should highlight the material from which it was made. Dodge’s silver often displayed his hammer marks and inventive techniques, revealing the beauty of these useful household goods.

The Arts and Crafts style of England became popular in the United States in the early 1900s. Asheville was an early adopter of the movement because of the popularity and abundance of Arts and Crafts architecture in neighborhoods like Biltmore Forest, Biltmore Village, and the area around The Grove Park Inn. The title of this exhibition was taken from the famous quotation by one of the founding members of the English Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris, who said, “have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Not only did Dodge follow this suggestion; he contributed to American Arts and Crafts silver’s relevancy persisting almost halfway into the 20th century.

“It has been over 15 years since the Museum exhibited its collection of William Waldo Dodge silver and I am looking forward to displaying it in the new space with some new acquisitions added,” said Whitney Richardson, associate curator. Learn more at ashevilleart.org.

Art Exhibit Animals of Red Bell Run: Flora + Fauna
Oct 5 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Tryon Fine Arts Center

Animals of Red Bell Run by Monica Stevenson

Passion begets passion, beauty begets beauty…..this is thought that is in professional photographer, Monica Stevenson’s, mind every moment she spends
at Red Bell Run. The photographs for this exhibition are inspired by Mary Adams, the owner of Red Bell Run, affection for and dedication to the animals and plants that thrive at her equine sanctuary.  As with much of Monica’s work, she leans heavily on her own collaborative spirit and the generous nature of her artistic partners–Preston Wainwright, floral designer, Thomas Ignatius and Sean Smith, both illustrative designers, to support some of the exhibit’s featured works. The resulting pictures included in this show, photographed with a large format digital camera and hand printed,  display an abundance of beautiful details– flowers, leaves, illustrations, textures, colors, dogs, cats, horses, donkeys, expressions, shapes, movement, fur, teeth, limbs–all the things that make up the natural world that is Red Bell Run.

Thursday, October 6, 2022
Artist Support Grant
Oct 6 all-day
online

The Artist Support Grant provides funding emerging or established artists to create work, improve their business operations, or bring their work to new audiences. Grants range from $500-3,000.

Arts Build Community Grant
Oct 6 all-day
online

The Arts Build Community grant supports innovative, arts-based projects that inspire diverse groups of participants to be more active, involved, and civically-engaged by creating together. Grants range from $1,000-2,500.

Bearfootin’ Public Art Walk + Auction
Oct 6 all-day
Hendersonville nc

ince 2003, the Bearfootin’ Art Walk has helped raise funding for Downtown Hendersonville and a variety of local non-profits. In addition to raising funds, the bears offer a window into good work being done by community organizations in Henderson County.

The Bearfootin’ Bears arrive as blank slates before local artists transform each in a spectacular fashion, with creative themes ranging from Mona Lisa to Blue Ridge Mountain scenery. After the “Reveal” event in early May, the bears then take up residence in downtown Hendersonville for the duration of the summer and fall, up until auction. Participants bid during the auction to raise funds for local non-profits and Downtown Hendersonville. Winning bids up to $3,000 are split evenly between the downtown program and the nonprofit chosen by the sponsor, while bid amounts exceeding $3,000 are directed entirely to the non-profit. In 2021, the Bears raised more than $100,000, and in 2022 we hope to continue the tradition of giving.

 

Biltmore: Legends of Art + Innovation
Oct 6 all-day
Biltmore Estate

Immerse yourself in Legends of Art & Innovation at Biltmore—featuring three
different large-scale, multi-sensory experiences—created and produced by Grande Experiences using the very latest in
immersive technology to illuminate the remarkable lives of Van Gogh, Monet, and Da Vinci and their timeless masterpieces of art
and design, Included with the cost of admission, Reservations required

“Life Art Life” William Bernstein 50 Year Art Retrospective
Oct 6 @ 10:30 am – 5:00 pm
Toe River Arts, Kokol Gallery

“LIFE ART LIFE William Bernstein 50 year retrospective” exhibition August 6-October 9, 2022 at the Toe River Arts’ Kokol Gallery, Spruce Pine, NC, features the paintings and glass of this artist who has been on the forefront of the studio glass movement.

Graduating 1968 from the Philadelphia College of Arts and just married, Bernstein moved to Penland School of Crafts to be their second glass resident artist from 1968-70. He was a co-founder of the Glass Arts Society (GAS) that formed to bring together the glass community so people could work together and learn from each other. Receiving numerous awards, fellowships and grants, he has exhibited internationally and has artwork in many private and public collections. Bernstein has lived most of his professional life in the rural Celo community of Yancey, North Carolina along with his family and artist wife, Katherine Bernstin. This retrospective provides a great opportunity for one to imagine a life surrounded by art.

This has been not only been a year-long process of curating pieces for an exhibit, but a lifetime of making art that connects with all things about one’s life. Bernstein’s work in glass and paint showcases just that: his family, his pets, friends, his environs, his moods and so much more. A life well-lived in creating art. More on Bernstein Glass www.bernsteinglass.com

William Warmus (A Fellow and former curator of Modern Glass at the Corning Museum), writes for the exhibition catalog, “Bernstein is a minimalist whose style is based upon the dedication to the concepts of honesty, modesty, and humility. It has a feel of its surroundings and of the people of the region.”

The Toe River Arts Kokol Gallery is located at 269 Oak Avenue, Spruce Pine, NC 28777. The exhibition dates: August 6 – October 9, 2022. Hours: Tuesdays-Saturdays from 10:30 – 5:00 pm. 828-765-0520, www.toeriverarts.org

Public receptions on Fridays: August 12 and October 7, both 5:00-7:00 PM. Artist gallery talk Friday, August 12, 4:00 pm. The exhibition travels to Cary Arts Center November 30 – January 21, 2023.

Coinciding with the United Nations’ Year 2022 as the Year of Glass and the 60th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement, this has been made possible by Toe River Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Cary Art Center, Art Alliance for Contemporary Glass, the Blumenthal Foundation, and Mountain Electronics in Micaville, NC.

Asheville Gallery of Art October Show: “Nature’s Gems”, featuring artist Judy Rentner
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Gallery of Art

Asheville Gallery of Art presents Judy Rentner’s rich, colorful paintings, during the month of October, in an exhibition titled ‘Nature’s Gems’. The opening reception will be held on Friday, October 7th from 5:00-8:00pm.

Of all of the seasons of the year, fall is the crescendo, the last burst of beauty before nature’s tones soften and become quiet in the winter months. Autumn colors are like precious gems: topaz, sapphires, emeralds, rubies…, an endless sparkling array of brilliance. Although an artist cannot compete with God’s creations, she can capture the awe-inspiring essence of a moment in time to share with her viewers. Judy is such an artist.

Judy Rentner has been painting the landscapes of Western North Carolina for 23 years and they continue to inspire her. Having lived in 10 different states from coast to coast, she still considers North Carolina one of the most beautiful. Although she has been painting most of her adult life, it was here that she found her creative style. Painting in oils, with a palette knife, enabled her to achieve the essence of a scene in light and color. Everything about the creative process is personal and many viewers find themselves drawn to Judy’s unique, inviting style.

A graduate of Ohio University, Judy Rentner did not pursue art until years later when she took workshops, in watercolor, from various artists. This was a pivotal time of discovery as she learned the skills needed to express her ideas in paint. She then experimented with different mediums producing work that was both realistic and abstract. Moving to North Carolina, she placed her work in galleries and taught classes in watercolor, acrylic, and oil. Currently, her passion lies in painting landscapes, with a palette knife, in oils. This technique has given her freedom of expression, using color to its fullest extent.

Judy’s work is represented in several galleries. Check out her website at www.judyrentner.com and be sure to drop by Asheville Gallery of Art this October to view her outstanding autumn paintings. The gallery is open from 11:00am until 6:00pm Monday through Sunday.

Her Painting Titles and writeup:

1. “Crossing into light”….My daughter, a photographer, went to Duke Gardens to “chase the light”. Normally I paint from my own sketches and photos, but this was so striking a scene, that it inspired me to capture it in oil.

2. “Sun Rise in the Mountains” was a combination of many scenes I have painted in our beautiful Smokey Mountains.

3 “Fall Treasure” This is a scene I captured in the Smokey Mountain National Park. Almost every fall I drive through the mountains of Western North Carolina searching for the right landscape. I do not have to go far as this is a painter’s paradise.

Border Cantos | Sonic Border Art Exhibition
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Richard Misrach, Wall, Jacumba, California, 2009, pigment print, 60 × 80 inches. Courtesy the Artist. © Richard Misrach, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco..
Border Cantos | Sonic Border, a unique collaboration between American photographer Richard Misrach and Mexican American sculptor and composer Guillermo Galindo, uses the power of art to explore and humanize the complex issues surrounding the Mexican-American border. Organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the transformative and multi-sensory experience will be on view in the Asheville Art Museum’s Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall from July 22 through October 24, 2022.

Misrach, who has photographed the border since 2004, beautifully captures landscapes and objects, including things left behind by migrants. His large-scale photographs, along with grids of smaller photos, highlight issues surrounding migration and its effect on regions and people, and also introduce a complicated look at policing the boundary.

Responding to these photographs, Galindo fashioned sound-generating sculptures from items Misrach collected along the border, such as water bottles, Border Patrol “drag tires,” spent shotgun shells, ladders, and sections of the border wall itself. The sounds they produce give voices to people through the personal belongings they have left behind. The composition embraces the Pre-Columbian belief that there was an intimate connection between an instrument and the material from which it was made, with no separation between spiritual and physical worlds. Based on the Mesoamerican Venus calendar, Sonic Border plays for a total of 260 minutes and is separated into 13 cycles of 20 minutes. Within these cycles, the instruments play in small groups of two or more, or all together as an orchestra.

Presented in English and Spanish, Border Cantos | Sonic Border offers perspective on the challenges of migration, inviting us to bridge boundaries. When experienced as a whole, the images, instruments, and emanating sounds create an immersive space in which to look, listen, and learn about the complicated issues surrounding the Mexican-American border. While the artists do not seek to provide solutions to these issues, they do provide insight into a place where most people have never ventured, creating a poignant connection that draws on our humanity.

Border Cantos | Sonic Border is organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas. Support for the national tour of Border Cantos | Sonic Border is provided by Art Bridges.

Learn more at ashevilleart.org.

Draped and Veiled Art Exhibit
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Draped and Veiled: 20×24 Polaroid Photographs by Joyce Tenneson showcases Joyce Tenneson’s Transformations series, which she began in 1985 and engaged with through 2005. Transformations features partially or fully nude figures poetically presented; Tenneson’s photographs have always been interested in the magic of the human figure, contained within bodies of all ages and emotions in a broad range that are both vulnerable and bold. This exhibition features 12 large Polaroids from the poetic series. Draped and Veiled will be on view May 25–October 10, 2022.
Georgia Deal + Tom Ashcraft: Uncharted
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Tracey Morgan Gallery

Tracey Morgan Gallery is pleased to present Uncharted, a joint exhibition by multiple-disciplinary artists Georgia Deal and Tom Ashcraft. Incorporating both individual and collaborative works, the exhibition will in-clude wooden and cast bronze boat sculptures, prints on hand-made paper, and photographs, all centered around ideas of physical and psychological transitions.

The isolation of the pandemic and the ensuing global geo-political tumult compelled Deal and Ashcraft to re-examine their studio practices. The individual and collaborative works in this exhibition reference a liminal space, that transitional point between “what was” and “what’s next.”

For Deal, the pandemic afforded time to examine ideas of solitude and anticipation and her work echoes the imagery brought on by that period of stasis. Ashcraft’s sculptures, selected versions from his collection of 200+ handmade wooden boats, gather ideas of migration, observation, scale, and object-making. Their col-laborative piece, Uncharted, undertakes these overlapping themes, dealing with both the psychic and antici-patory nature of movement, especially when that movement is only possible through imagination

Deal and Ashcraft each conduct significant individual studio practices and have been committed to the ethic of collaborative art for over 35 years. They are core members of Workingman Collective, founded in 2005 as a cooperative group of artists and other professionals whose membership and objectives evolve to fit each new project. They are interested in process, invention, chance, and the public.

Georgia Deal is Professor Emeritus and former Chair of the Printmaking and Papermaking Program at the Corcoran School of Art & Design of George Washington University in Washington DC. Her work is in multiple collections including the Philadelphia Museum, the Library of Congress, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and Yale University Library. She currently lives in Asheville, NC and is proprietor of the papermaking studio, Swannanoa Paper.

Tom Ashcraft’s diverse practice is rooted in object-making, public and participatory artwork. He and Work-ingman Collective have exhibited and produced work in the U.S., Europe, the Caribbean and Africa. Awards include a National Endowment for the Arts Design Grant and a Ford Foundation Fellowship, among others. He recently completed a student / artist collaborative work “Public Practice” which was a three-year course focused on creating two permanent artworks for the US Embassy in Niamey, Niger, commissioned by Art in Embassies, US Department of State. Ashcraft is currently based in Asheville, North Carolina and is the MFA Director and Distinguished Professor at the School of Art + Design, Western Carolina University.

Rebel/Re-Belle: Exploring Gender, Agency, and Identity | Selections from the Asheville Art Museum and Rubell Museum
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Wednesday through Monday from 11am to 6pm
Corn Wagon Thunder, Laundromat from the Wonder series, 2017. Archival print on Epson Ultra Premium Presentation matte paper, 10 × 15 inches, Asheville Art Museum. © Corn Wagon Thunder.

Rebel/Re-Belle: Exploring Gender, Agency, and Identity Selections from the Asheville Art Museum and Rubell Museum combines works, primarily created by women, from two significant collections of contemporary art to explore how artists have innovated, influenced, interrogated, and inspired visual culture in the past 100 years.

Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton Exhibition
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
 
Left: Thermon Statom, Frankincense, 1999, siligraphy from glass plate with digital transfer on BFK Rives paper, edition 50/50, 36 1/4 × 29 3/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Thermon Statom. | Right: Dale Chihuly, Suite of Ten Prints: Chandelier, 1994, 4-color intaglio from glass plate on BRK Rives paper, edition 34/50, image: 29 ½ × 23 ½ inches, sheet: 36 × 29 ½ inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Dale Chihuly / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Asheville, N.C.—The selection of works from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection presented in Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton features imagery that recreates the sensation and colors of stained glass. The exhibition showcases Littleton and the range of makers who worked with him, including Dale Chihuly, Cynthia Bringle, Thermon Statom, and more. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator—will be on view in The Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery at the Museum from January 12 through May 23, 2022.

In 1974 Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) developed a process for using glass to create prints on paper. Littleton, who began as a ceramicist and became a leading figure in the American Studio Glass Movement, expanded his curiosity around the experimental potential of glass into innovations in the world of printmaking. A wide circle of artists in a variety of media—including glass, ceramics, and painting—were invited to Littleton’s studio in Spruce Pine, NC, to create prints using the vitreograph process developed by Littleton. Upending notions of both traditional glassmaking and printmaking, vitreographs innovatively combine the two into something new. The resulting prints created through a process of etched glass, ink, and paper create rich, colorful scenes reminiscent of luminous stained glass.

“Printmaking is a medium that many artists explore at some point in their career,” says Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. “The process is often collaborative, as they may find themselves working with a print studio and highly skilled printmaker. The medium can also be quite experimental. Harvey Littleton’s contribution to the field is very much so in this spirit, as seen in his incorporation of glass and his invitation to artists who might otherwise not have explored works on paper. Through this exhibition, we are able to appreciate how the artists bring their work in clay, glass, or paint to ink and paper.” 

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge
Oct 6 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Left to right: William Waldo Dodge Jr., Teapot, 1928, hammered silver and ebony, 8 × 5 3/4 × 9 1/2 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr. | William Waldo Dodge Jr., Lidded vegetable bowl, 1932, hammered silver, 6 × 6 5/8 × 6 5/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of William Waldo Dodge Jr.

Useful and Beautiful: Silvercraft by William Waldo Dodge features a selection of functional silver works by Dodge drawn from the Museum’s Collection. Organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator, this exhibition will be on view in the Debra McClinton Gallery at the Museum from February 23 through October 17, 2022.

William Waldo Dodge Jr. (Washington, DC 1895–1971 Asheville, NC) moved to Asheville in 1924 as a trained architect and a newly skilled silversmith. When he opened for business promoting his handwrought silver tableware, including plates, candlesticks, flatware (spoons, forks, and knives), and serving dishes, he did so in a true Arts and Crafts tradition. The aesthetics of the style were dictated by its philosophy: an artist’s handmade creation should reflect their hard work and skill, and the resulting artwork should highlight the material from which it was made. Dodge’s silver often displayed his hammer marks and inventive techniques, revealing the beauty of these useful household goods.

The Arts and Crafts style of England became popular in the United States in the early 1900s. Asheville was an early adopter of the movement because of the popularity and abundance of Arts and Crafts architecture in neighborhoods like Biltmore Forest, Biltmore Village, and the area around The Grove Park Inn. The title of this exhibition was taken from the famous quotation by one of the founding members of the English Arts and Crafts Movement, William Morris, who said, “have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” Not only did Dodge follow this suggestion; he contributed to American Arts and Crafts silver’s relevancy persisting almost halfway into the 20th century.

“It has been over 15 years since the Museum exhibited its collection of William Waldo Dodge silver and I am looking forward to displaying it in the new space with some new acquisitions added,” said Whitney Richardson, associate curator. Learn more at ashevilleart.org.

Art Exhibit Animals of Red Bell Run: Flora + Fauna
Oct 6 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Tryon Fine Arts Center

Animals of Red Bell Run by Monica Stevenson

Passion begets passion, beauty begets beauty…..this is thought that is in professional photographer, Monica Stevenson’s, mind every moment she spends
at Red Bell Run. The photographs for this exhibition are inspired by Mary Adams, the owner of Red Bell Run, affection for and dedication to the animals and plants that thrive at her equine sanctuary.  As with much of Monica’s work, she leans heavily on her own collaborative spirit and the generous nature of her artistic partners–Preston Wainwright, floral designer, Thomas Ignatius and Sean Smith, both illustrative designers, to support some of the exhibit’s featured works. The resulting pictures included in this show, photographed with a large format digital camera and hand printed,  display an abundance of beautiful details– flowers, leaves, illustrations, textures, colors, dogs, cats, horses, donkeys, expressions, shapes, movement, fur, teeth, limbs–all the things that make up the natural world that is Red Bell Run.

Thursday Night Live: Connor Law and Chuck Lichtenberger
Oct 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Connor Law has been working as a professional musician in Asheville since 2018 and works with many of the top jazz musicians in the area. Aside from his work as a freelance bassist, he also is a composer and bandleader.

Chuck Lichtenberger graduated from UNCA in 1996 and has been an integral part of the thriving Asheville music scene ever since. The pianist can be found playing jazz and rock with a wide array of other musicians.

THURSDAY NIGHT LIVE

On select Thursdays, local musicians enliven our spaces with music to complement your visit. As you stroll the galleries, a variety of tunes adds new dimensions to your viewing experience.

True Home Open Mic at Flood Gallery
Oct 6 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Flood Gallery

Uncensored expression: anyone is invited to step up to share song, music, poetry, comedy, rants & raves!

The most eclectic open mic around, in a welcoming gallery setting! 6 pm signup, perform 6:30-8:30 pm.

Friday, October 7, 2022
Artist Support Grant
Oct 7 all-day
online

The Artist Support Grant provides funding emerging or established artists to create work, improve their business operations, or bring their work to new audiences. Grants range from $500-3,000.

Arts Build Community Grant
Oct 7 all-day
online

The Arts Build Community grant supports innovative, arts-based projects that inspire diverse groups of participants to be more active, involved, and civically-engaged by creating together. Grants range from $1,000-2,500.