Browse through upcoming arts and theater events in Asheville, NC, including Broadway shows, musicals, plays, operas, and more.

Friday, January 28, 2022
2022 Season Hendersonville Theatre on sale Now!
Jan 28 all-day
Hendersonville Theatre

ON SALE NOVEMBER 26, 2021

Because we know that everyone’s schedules are different, Hendersonville Theatre offers four excellent Season Ticket packages that will get you the best seats in the house and save you money.

SHOWS INCLUDED IN THIS PACKAGE:

Nunsense Jamboree
Red, White & Tuna
25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
The Haunting of Hill House
Five Carols for Christmas & JingleJacks

Art Grant: Arts Build Community
Jan 28 all-day
online

Apply by 2/14 | $500-2,500 grants for arts-based community projects. Priority will be given to projects based in low-income neighborhoods, Title 1 public schools, and communities in need.

BE THE CHANGE, BUY A MURAL
Jan 28 all-day
online

Buy one of these murals for yourself or to donate to a local organization (make sure you check with them first), and keep the good work going! All proceeds from this auction will be split evenly between The Martin Luther King, Jr. Association of Asheville and Buncombe County’s COPE Program and the Asheville Area Arts Council’s Arts Build Community Grant. Auction ends February 28.

Following the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, MN, on May 25, 2020, protests broke out across the nation. Floyd was killed after a white police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly 9 minutes. In response, hundreds of protestors gathered in downtown Asheville from May 29- June 6, 2020, with cries for justice and change.

During this time, Lowe’s Home Improvement generously donated plywood for downtown business owners to cover their storefronts while Asheville had its own reckoning. Business owners and artists seized this opportunity to lend their support for needed changes by painting murals on the plywood covering downtown businesses. Local muralists Gus Cutty, Kathryn Crawford, and Dustin Spagnola were the driving force behind this initiative.

When it came time for the murals to come down, local artists Evar Hecht and Ben Nelson had the foresight to collect and temporarily store these works, gathering over 150 pieces of plywood. The Asheville Area Arts Council, with the help of Dogwood Health Trust, then stepped in to move the murals to a secure, climate-controlled storage facility and worked with Aisha Adams of Equity Over Everything to determine next steps.

After several COVID setbacks, the arts council is proud to have partnered with the Martin Luther King Jr Association of Asheville and Buncombe County to present this virtual exhibition, auction and speaker series. It is our hope that the proceeds from the auction will support continued change and healing  in our community.

Thank you to Dogwood Health Trust for generously providing the funding to make this project possible, and to the artists and business owners for donating their time and energy to capture this moment in our history.

A video about the exhibition is featured as part of the 41st Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration.

Curatorial Fellowship
Jan 28 all-day
online with Center for Craft

Fellowship program supporting emerging craft curators to explore and test new ideas about craft.

Details

  • Award Amount:
  • Up to $5,000
  • Grant Period:
  • Through 2023

Timeline

  • Applications Open:
  • Nov 16, 2021
  • Orientation:
  • January 14, 2022
  • Deadline:
  • Feb 14, 2022
  • Notification:
  • Apr 2022
  • Grant Period begins:
  • May 2022
  • Grant Period ends:
  • Through 2023
Flat Rock Playhouse’s 2022 Season
Jan 28 all-day
Flat Rock Playhouse

This year will feature an exhilarating blend of beloved productions, including Million Dollar Quartet, West Side Story, and Mamma Mia! The popular Music on the Rock® series, Studio 52 Family Programming, and a brand new Black Box series round out the 2022 season and mark a renewed beginning for FRP after a long pandemic shutdown.

 

Season subscriptions are on sale now. Music on the Rock® single tickets go on sale on January 24, 2022, and single tickets for all remaining shows go on sale on February 14, 2022.

 

The Music of Tom Petty

Feb. 24-March 5

 

Two Jews, Talking

A Hilarious Staged Reading

March 17-19

A side-splitting piece written by Ed. Weinberger, our characters take us on a rollicking romp through time! The two-act story brings Lou and Bud together in the Biblical past, and Phil and Marty together in contemporary Long Island. They philosophize about women, sex, food, the divine, and destiny in this tale of companionship and friendship.

 

The Music of Elton John

March 31-April 2

 

The Music of Neil Diamond

April 7-10

 

Catch Me If You Can

April 28-May 14

This comedy thriller is a classic gem with exciting twists and turns from beginning to end. “The final 15 minutes will reward you like a murder mystery should.” The New York Times

 

Million Dollar Quartet

May 20-June 19

Back by popular demand, the musical celebrates the historic Sam Phillips studio recording sessions of Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Elvis Presley.

 

The Music of the Eagles

An Outdoor Stadium Concert

June 18

Join Flat Rock Playhouse for another rockin’ evening of outdoor summer fun at West Henderson’s Athletic Stadium, Johnson Field.

 

West Side Story

July 1-30

The Romeo and Juliet inspired love story of Tony and Maria amid the Jets and Sharks gang rivalry. Ranked #1 in the most recent survey of theatre patrons.

 

Mozart to Pop Chart

The Musical Story Continues

August 5-13

Nat Zegree (Jerry Lee Lewis/Amadeus) is back to whisk you away on an all-new musical journey through the history and triumphs of music from Mozart to today’s current hits. Featuring many of the local region’s best rock and symphonic musicians!

 

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

August 19-Sept. 4

Don’t miss this fresh and relevant stage adaptation of the iconic film that starred the inimitable and great Sidney Poitier.

 


 

Introducing The Black Box Series.

September 15-October 9

 You’ve never experienced a play on The Rock like before. The audience and artists share the MainStage for an intimate and immersive theatre experience.  The Black Box Series will feature contemporary works, classics, and stories and playwrights from around the globe. Be among the first to join us on this new and exciting theatrical journey!

 

God of Carnage

Sept. 15-Oct. 8

A triple-Tony Award-winning Broadway sensation the New Yorker called “laugh-out-loud hilarity,” and “ninety minutes of sustained mayhem.”

 

Blood Knot

Sept. 16-Oct. 9

A play that asks us to dig beneath the surface of what makes us kin and what happens when we don’t like what we find there. By renowned South African playwright Athol Fugard.

 


 

Mamma Mia!

Encore Performance

Oct. 21-Nov. 13

The hugely popular mega-Broadway hit featuring the music of ABBA is back for an encore performance. Featuring songs like “Dancing Queen,” “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!,” “Honey Honey” and so many more.

 

A Flat Rock Playhouse Christmas

November 25-December 22

The WNC tradition continues. Same great show, all new material. A Playhouse favorite that will leave you feeling merry and bright!

 

A Charlie Brown Christmas (Studio 52)

December 1-4

Everyone’s favorite holiday classic comes to life in a spectacular new production of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Adapted from Charles M. Schulz’s timeless story the whole family can enjoy. Join Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, and the whole Peanuts gang as they sing, dance, and learn the true meaning of Christmas!

 

To learn more about the 2022 lineup and how to purchase your tickets, please visit the website at www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

 

FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE

 

In 1937, a group of struggling performers, led by Robroy Farquhar, organized themselves as the Vagabond Players. The Vagabonds worked in a variety of places over the course of three years, and in 1940 found themselves in the Blue Ridge region of Western North Carolina. The local and tourist community welcomed them with open arms when they presented their first summer season of plays in a 150-year-old grist mill they converted into The Old Mill Playhouse at Highland Lake. So successful was that summer, they returned in 1941. After WWII, the Vagabond Players reorganized came back to the region and opened a playhouse in nearby Lake Summit. The Lake Summit Playhouse thrived during the post-war years and soon the Vagabond Players were looking for a larger and permanent home. In 1952, the troupe of performers, and a newly formed board of directors made an offer to buy an 8-acre lot in the Village of Flat Rock. This new home made the Vagabonds “locals” and a rented big top gave birth to Flat Rock Playhouse. As the beautiful Western Carolina region continued to grow, so did the Playhouse and in 1961, by Act of the North Carolina General Assembly, Flat Rock Playhouse was officially designated The State Theatre of North Carolina. What began as a few weeks of summer performances in 1940 is now a nine-month season of plays including Broadway musicals, comedy, drama, and theatre for young audiences. The Playhouse’s dual mission of producing the performing arts and providing education in the performing arts includes a professional series; a summer and fall college apprentice and intern program; and Studio 52, year-round classes and workshops in theatre and film for students from kindergarten through adults. Flat Rock Playhouse now hosts over 98,000 patrons annually and is a significant contributor to the local economy and the Arts in North Carolina.

# # #

 

Student Poetry Contest – “Ambition”
Jan 28 all-day
online

January through April

Actors performing Sandburg's works on stageActors portray characters from Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Story “Three Boys with Jugs of Molasses and Secret Ambitions.”

NPS Photo

Educators in grades 3-12 are invited to submit original poems written by their students in February. The poems will be judged and winners announced in April. Find the 2022 Poetry Contest Information and submission guidelines here. The theme “Ambition” is from one of Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, to celebrate it’s 100th year of being published. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.”

Students are invited to submit a poem to Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site’s annual Student Poetry Contest. The contest encourages youth to explore writing their own poetry, and is open to students nationwide!

Submissions are accepted from grades 3-12 and must be postmarked by March 1, 2022. See below for submission rules.

Winners will be notified by April 8, 2022, and will be invited to participate in a special virtual program on April 22.


2022 Contest Rules

Theme – “Ambition”
Carl Sandburg wrote millions of words reflecting on the American experience of the 20th century. Though his words often focused on war, labor, and social injustice, as a father of three, he also wrote imaginative, zany, and fantastical children’s stories, called “Rootabaga Stories.” Carl Sandburg’s “Rootabaga Stories” were first published in 1922 and celebrate 100 years of entertaining readers of all ages this year. The theme “Ambition” is from one of these stories. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.” Read the story here.

Poems submitted for the 2022 contest should reflect the theme of “Ambition.” By definition, a strong desire to do or to achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work. Or setting goals to achieve success.

Submission Rules

  • Poetry accepted from 3-12th grades only. Poems will be grouped for judging by 3-5th, 6-8th, and 9-12th.
  • Poems must be submitted by a teacher (traditional classroom or homeschool teacher).
  • No more than three poems per class. Teachers with multiple classes, can submit up to three poems per class period.
  • Poem will be judged on its ability to communicate the theme.
  • Poem can be written in any style, but must not exceed one-page in length. No illustrations.
  • Poems must be typed, no handwritten entries, using standard computer fonts, like Times, Arial, etc…
  • Do not place any identifying information (name, school, grade, etc…) on poem sheet, that will go on the accompanying submission form.
  • Submission form must be complete to be accepted:
    • Paperclipped to poem, no staples
    • Must be signed by parent, student and teacher
    • Submissions must be postmarked, faxed, or e-mailed to [email protected], by March 1, 2022. Emailed submissions must be docs, .pdfs or scans. Low resolution pictures of the submission will not be accepted.

Judging
Judges from the literary community will make the decision for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place within each grade category (3-5th, 6-8th, 9-12th).

Poetry Partners
The 2022 Poetry Contest is a result of tremendous community support including the Friends of Carl Sandburg at Connemara, and literary volunteers who serve as judges. Thank you.

Poetry Resources
You may also find curriculum resources to use in the classroom at the park’s website: www.nps.gov/carl/learn/education/index.htm.

Send Submissions to:
Carl Sandburg Home NHS
Attn: Poetry Contest
81 Carl Sandburg Lane
Flat Rock, North Carolina 28731
Fax 828-693-4179
Email: [email protected]

The Asheville Fringe Arts Festival
Jan 28 all-day
The Asheville Fringe Arts Festival various locations

GET YOUR FRINGE FREAK PASS

See up to 10 shows for one price!

*For in-person shows only

If you know you’re going to see more than 5 in-person shows, you definitely need to get a Freak Pass. It’s your all access pass to the whole festival. Seats are limited, so you will want to reserve your seats when you buy your Freak pass.

* Price increases to $70 on January 1st.

The Asheville Fringe Arts Festival celebrates 20 years of experimental, unusual, and out-of-the-box art. Performances of dance, theater, puppetry, and music, as well as film and installation, will take place — both in person and online — January 27-30, 2022. 

 

In honor of the festival’s milestone anniversary, here are 20 fringe benefits (see what we did there?) of this year’s event: 

 

1. Local artists! More than 25 creatives from the Asheville area will share works that span and bend genres.

2. Out-of-town artists! Take 50 Shades of Gay, an adult variety show filled with comedy, music, drag, costumes, and audience participation. It was written, produced, and stars award-winning, New Jersey-based comedian Ike Avelli.

3. Education! For instance, The New York Yoyo Show is an interactive, musical production featuring advanced yoyo demos, two Broadway-style numbers, and the grand finale: “The World’s Longest Yoyo String.” After the show, the audience is invited to stick around for a free yoyo lesson.

4. Spoken word! Asheville locals BAD TIES blend a unique spin on beat poetry with mixed media performance art. In the Mouth of Urban Decay is a 30-minute presentation of film, music, and original spoken word surrounding themes of displacement, geography, and life’s little disappointments.

5. Theater! Devised theatre piece The Marvelous Martha Monday is created and performed by Katie Jones. It’s based on her great-great-grandmother, who made family legend by running away with the circus as a teenager.

6. Adventure! Short film Fantastica is an inner galactic adventure with Venusian guide Smokifantastic.

7. Venues! LEAF Global Arts, The Magnetic Theatre, Static Age Records, Fleetwoods, and The LaZoom Bus will all host shows.

8. Virtual! That’s right — this hybrid festival also includes streaming shows for those who want or need to stay in.

9-12.Film nights include two international collections as well as short films, and dance-themed screenings.

13. The Fringe Freak Pass is back! Passholders can see up to 10 shows for one price: $50 before Jan. 1, 2022 / $70 after.

14. New this year, the Fringe Binge (only $40 until Jan. 1 / $60 after) allows access to all online Asheville Fringe content, including film nights and shows live-streamed by IamAVL.

15-18. Four parties! Before and after!

19. Community! See old friends, make new friends, revel in weird and wonderful art.

20. Fringe on! Fringe art exists outside of the mainstream. It’s experimental, unusual, and one-of-a-kind. From music and theater to puppetry and dance, Asheville Fringe Arts Festival offers the best of the unexpected.

 Individual tickets go on sale Saturday, Jan. 1.

 

The Asheville Fringe Arts Festival celebrates 20 years of weird and wonderful art
Jan 28 all-day
online only Fringe

The Asheville Fringe Arts Festival celebrates 20 years of experimental, unusual, and out-of-the-box art. Performances of dance, theater, puppetry, and music, as well as film and installation, will take place — both in person and online — January 27-30, 2022. 

 

In honor of the festival’s milestone anniversary, here are 20 fringe benefits (see what we did there?) of this year’s event: 

 

1. Local artists! More than 25 creatives from the Asheville area will share works that span and bend genres.

2. Out-of-town artists! Take 50 Shades of Gay, an adult variety show filled with comedy, music, drag, costumes, and audience participation. It was written, produced, and stars award-winning, New Jersey-based comedian Ike Avelli.

3. Education! For instance, The New York Yoyo Show is an interactive, musical production featuring advanced yoyo demos, two Broadway-style numbers, and the grand finale: “The World’s Longest Yoyo String.” After the show, the audience is invited to stick around for a free yoyo lesson.

4. Spoken word! Asheville locals BAD TIES blend a unique spin on beat poetry with mixed media performance art. In the Mouth of Urban Decay is a 30-minute presentation of film, music, and original spoken word surrounding themes of displacement, geography, and life’s little disappointments.

5. Theater! Devised theatre piece The Marvelous Martha Monday is created and performed by Katie Jones. It’s based on her great-great-grandmother, who made family legend by running away with the circus as a teenager.

6. Adventure! Short film Fantastica is an inner galactic adventure with Venusian guide Smokifantastic.

7. Venues! LEAF Global Arts, The Magnetic Theatre, Static Age Records, Fleetwoods, and The LaZoom Bus will all host shows.

8. Virtual! That’s right — this hybrid festival also includes streaming shows for those who want or need to stay in.

9-12.Film nights include two international collections as well as short films, and dance-themed screenings.

13. The Fringe Freak Pass is back! Passholders can see up to 10 shows for one price: $50 before Jan. 1, 2022 / $70 after.

14. New this year, the Fringe Binge (only $40 until Jan. 1 / $60 after) allows access to all online Asheville Fringe content, including film nights and shows live-streamed by IamAVL.

15-18. Four parties! Before and after!

19. Community! See old friends, make new friends, revel in weird and wonderful art.

20. Fringe on! Fringe art exists outside of the mainstream. It’s experimental, unusual, and one-of-a-kind. From music and theater to puppetry and dance, Asheville Fringe Arts Festival offers the best of the unexpected.

 Individual tickets go on sale Saturday, Jan. 1.

 

 

Van Gogh Alive at Biltmore Estate
Jan 28 all-day
Biltmore Estate

See the source image

Various times

His masterworks have been displayed around the world for over a century… but never like this. Described as “an unforgettable multi-sensory experience,” Van Gogh Alive is a powerful and vibrant symphony of light, color, sound, and scent that compels you to leave the world behind and immerse yourself in Van Gogh’s paintings. Simultaneously enchanting, entertaining, and educational, Van Gogh Alive stimulates all the senses and opens the mind.

YOU CAN’T BUY LOVE BUT YOU CAN ADOPT IT Photo Contest
Jan 28 all-day
online

Photography Contest Submission

ELIGIBILITY: Anyone with a camera who has given a home to a homeless pet!

ENTRY PERIOD: Now – February 6th. Entries submitted before or after the Entry Period will not be eligible.

WHAT TO ENTER: Blue Ridge Humane Society is committed to reducing the overpopulation of companion animals and to improve their quality of life through adoption, collaboration, and community education. For our “You Can’t Buy Love But You Can Rescue It” Photo Contest, we’d like for you to submit a photo of your rescue pet. Show us what a homeless pet’s second chance at a happily-ever-after looks like!

HOW TO ENTER: All images must be submitted following the steps on the registration form on the Blue Ridge Humane Society website. We kindly ask for a $15 donation per each photo entry. 100% of each donation will go directly to the care and services for the animals at our shelter. You may enter as many photos as you would like.

JUDGING: Photos will be judged by a panel of local community members. BRHS will notify the winners by February 11, 2022. An awards reception will be held on Thursday, February 17th at Dry Falls Brewing with the top three overall and 10 runner up photos on display.

WINNERS: All winning photos will be on display at Dry Falls Brewing starting February 17th. Prizes will be awarded for the top three with display at Dry Falls and online, with the 10 honorable mentions also on display at Dry Falls at the contest reception.

 

Get Started  Dance can be life-changing: The Academy at Terpsicorps Studios
Jan 28 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Academy at Terpsicorps Studios

Get Started

 Dance can be life-changing. We want to show you how.  Come try two weeks of classes for just $29.99

Fall/Winter Schedule 2021/2022

Additional Information

ATTD New Fall 2021-2022 Class Schedule – August 22, 2021- May 27, 2022

*Note that ages serve only as a guideline.  Below represents our Curriculum based ballet programs.  Look for additional class offerings of Int/Adv Tap, Jazz & Hip- Hop TBA. Combo I – Elementary II placement is based on age.  Level 1 and above are skill based placement.  All schedules are subject to change.

Combo I : Pre- Ballet/Pre- Tap Curriculum (Age 3-4 )

Monday 4:00-5:00

OR
Wednesday 5:00-6:00

OR
Saturday 9:45-10:45

OR

Saturday11:00-12:00

Combo II : Ballet/Tap Curriculum Age (5-6)

Monday 4:00-5:00

OR

Wednesday 5:00-6:00

OR

Saturday  9:45-10:45

OR

Saturday 11:00-12:00

Elementary I : Introduction to Classical Technique w/Tap & Jazz (Age 6-7)

Monday 5:00-5:45 Ballet: Section A

5:45-6:30 Tap & Jazz : Section A

Wednesday 5:00-5:45 Ballet: Section B

5:45-6:30 Tap & Jazz : Section B
Elementary II: Introduction to Classical Technique w/ Tap, Jazz & Repertoire(Age 7-8)

Monday 5:00-5:45 Ballet:
5:45-6:30 Tap / Jazz
Thursday 5:00-6:15 Ballet
6:15-7:00 Repertoire

Boys Class:
Wednesday 6:00-6:45 w/Mr. Merz Elementary I- Level II

Level I : Classical Ballet Technique, with Repertoire and one enrichment class (Age 8-10 placement required)

Tuesday 4:30-5:30 Conditioning w/ Jazz Contemporary

5:30-6:30 Ballet Technique

Thursday 5:00-6:15 Ballet

6:15-7:00 Repertoire

Level II : Classical Ballet Technique, w/ Repertoire and 2 enrichment classes (Age 9-11 placement required)

Tuesday 4:30-5:30 Conditioning w/ Jazz Contemporary

5:30-6:30 Ballet Technique
Thursday 5:00-6:15 Ballet
Friday 4:00-5:30 Ballet Technique

5:30-6:30 Repertoire

Level III : Classical Ballet Technique w/Repertoire, pre-pointe, conditioning, specialty classes (Age 10-12 placement required)

Monday 5:00-6:30 Ballet Technique
6:30-7:15 Pre- Pointe/Variations
Tuesday 4:30-5:30 Conditioning w/ Jazz Contemporary

5:30-6:30 Ballet Technique
Friday 4:30-5:30 Ballet Technique
5:30-6:15 Repertoire

Level IV/V : Classical Ballet Technique w/ Repertoire, pointe, conditioning, specialty classes ( Placement required)

Monday 4:30-6:00 Ballet Technique

6:00-7:00 Repertoire

Tuesday 4:30-6:00 Ballet Technique

6:00-7:00 Modern
Wednesday 4:30-6:00 Ballet Technique

6:00-7:00 Pointe/Conditioning

Thursday 4:30-6:00 Ballet Technique

6:00-6:45 Pointe

*Saturday 11:00-12:15 Warm-up Technique **ONLY WHEN CALLED**

12:30-2pm Rehearsal **ONLY WHEN CALLED**

PreProfessional Day Program : Vocational Ballet Training ( Age 14- audition required)

Monday: 2:00-3:30 Ballet Technique

3:30-4:30 Pointe-Conditioning/Pointe

4:30-6:00 2nd Technique barre en pointe

Tuesday  2:00-3:30 Ballet Technique center en pointe

3:30-4:30 Modern

4:30-6:00 2nd Technique barre en pointe

Wednesday 2:00-3:30 Ballet Technique

3:30-4:30 Pointe/Repertoire

4:30-6:00 2nd Technique

Thursday 2:00-3:30 Ballet Technique

3:30-4:30 Pointe Variations

4:30-6:00 2nd Technique

Friday 2:00-3:30 Ballet Technique

3:30-4:30 Pas de Deux

*Saturday 11:00-12:15 Warm-up Technique

12:30-2pm Rehearsal

“Weaving Across Time”
Jan 28 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Bringing thousands of years of tradition into conversation with contemporary practice, the Center for Craft’s exhibition ᎢᏛᏍᎦ ᏫᏥᏤᎢ ᎠᎵᏰᎵᏒ Weaving Across Time showcases the works of nine Eastern Band Cherokee basket makers. Touching on the dynamic evolution of lineage, sustainability, and cultural expression, the exhibition opens on December 13. This exhibition is supported in part by the Cherokee Preservation Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and AARP, Mountain Region North Carolina.

The artists’ work with two of the oldest materials in Cherokee basket making tradition, mountain rivercane and white oak, both of which have been used for thousands of years by Southeastern tribes. The end results are both beautiful and functional – entries in an evolving craft tradition that began tens of thousands of years ago and is experiencing a resurgence. The labor-intensive process of basket making, which includes harvesting materials, gathering plants for dyes, and deciding on intricate patterns, itself becomes a key component of the final object, which interweaves ecology, culture, land, and identity.

These plants, particularly rivercane, are at the heart of Cherokee tradition and culture. The subject of serious conservation efforts, rivercane is also a vital plant for water quality and erosion mitigation, as well as a habitat for riparian species. Despite its importance, the effects of climate change and continually encroaching development in rivercane habitats has contributed to its depletion, both as a material for artists and a plant essential for environmental health. Basket makers harvesting rivercane for splints approach the plant with deep reverence and knowledge of its centrality to the ecosystem, sometimes traveling hundreds of miles to harvest it sustainably.

Other materials, selected with just as much care, reveal elements of process and the natural environment, including the plants available to harvest in particular seasons. White oak can be gathered year-round, but is easiest to process in spring and summer when sap runs up the tree. Dyes used for the baskets, sourced from plants including bloodroot, butternut, and walnut, add rich color to final pieces while also revealing information about harvest time and supply. The laborious, intensive process links generations of basket makers across centuries.

As Cherokee lands have been stolen or transformed beyond recognition, materials are harder to come by, but the rewards are rich. As basket maker ᏚᏍᏓᏯᎫᎾᏱ Gabriel Crow, explains, “When you’re taking that extra step, going out and doing this completely by hand, you’re a basket maker, not just a weaver. My hands are rough and calloused over because I make the splints myself.” Crow makes an average of just 20 baskets a year and, like other basket makers, wastes no scraps, instead making mats, miniature pieces, or, as a last resort, using them for kindling.

The baskets in the exhibition, all of which were created in the last two decades, connect lineages across time and space in a vibrant, living tradition. Patterns based on rhythmic numerical sequences are passed down from teacher to student. Basket makers also borrow from contemporaries and innovate to create pieces in their own recognizable styles. Basket maker ᎺᎵ ᏔᎻᏏᏂ Mary W. Thompson, who is also the consulting artist for The Basket public art parklet, finds inspiration in designs she sees on her travels to visit other tribes in North and South America. For her, baskets are symbolic of Cherokee resilience. “The Cherokee have always been able to change and adapt with time,” she says, “so our artwork and art forms have changed and evolved along with us.”

The exhibition will be on view until April 22. Visitors can reserve 30-minute time slots for unguided visits to explore the current exhibitions, learn more about the Center’s national impact, and enjoy interactive activities. The Center is open to the public Monday – Friday, 10 am – 6 pm. Hours of operation may be subject to change.

Center for Craft is monitoring the effects of COVID-19 on the community and following the instruction of federal, state, and local health departments. Our top priority is always the health and safety of our staff, coworkers, and visitors. At this time, the Center requires the use of masks or face coverings by all visitors, including children. The Center reserves the right to refuse entry to any visitor that will not comply.

2022 WNC Regional Scholastic Art Awards Exhibition
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Olivia Jones, Face Vessel, Ceramics & Glass, Silsa-Asheville High School, Grade 12. 2022 WNC Regional Scholastic Art Awards, Gold Key award.
The Asheville Art Museum has announced the regional award recipients of the 2022 Scholastic Art Awards and artworks will be on view at the Museum.
The regional program is judged in two groups: Group I, grades 7–8 and Group II, grades 9–12. Out of 540 total art entries, 190 works have been recognized by the judges, and Gold and Silver Key award-winning artworks are featured in this exhibition while honorable mentions will be featured digitally. The 2022 regional judges include local artists and educators Brandy Bourne, Jenny Pickens, and M. Paige Taylor.

Those works receiving Gold Keys have been submitted to compete in the 99th Annual National Scholastic Art Awards Program in New York City. Of the Gold Key Award recipients, five students have also been nominated for American Visions, indicating their work is the Best in Show of the regional awards. One of these American Visions Nominees will receive an American Visions Medal at the 2022 National Scholastic Art Awards. Award winners include students from public, private, homeschools, and charter schools in Buncombe, Burke, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Madison, McDowell, Rutherford.

Since the program’s founding in 1923, the Scholastic Art Awards have fostered the creativity and talent of millions of students, and include a distinguished list of alumni including Andy Warhol, who received recognition in the Awards when he was a teen.

National Gold Key medalists will be announced in March 2022 and honored during a special awards ceremony in June 2022.

For more information about the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers and the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, visit the Scholastic Newsroom: mediaroom.scholastic.com/artandwriting.

Citations (left to right): Wen Yaxuan, Shakivatou, Painting, Asheville School, Grade 12. 2022 WNC Regional Scholastic Art Awards, Gold Key award. | Gracie Hart, Fly, Drawing & Illustration, West Henderson High School, Grade 11. 2022 WNC Regional Scholastic Art Awards, Gold Key award.
About the Asheville Art Museum  
The Museum’s galleries, the Museum Store, Art PLAYce, and Perspective Café are open with limited capacity. The Frances Mulhall Achilles Art Research Library remains temporarily closed. The Museum welcomes visitors Wednesday through Monday from 11am to 6pm, with late-night Thursdays from 11am to 9pm. The Museum is closed on Tuesdays. General admission is always free for Museum Members, UNC Asheville students, active-duty military personnel with valid ID, and children under 6; $15 per adult; $13 per senior (65+); and $10 per student (child 6–17 or degree-seeking college students with valid ID). Admission tickets are available at ashevilleart.org/visit. Visitors may become Members at the welcome desk during their visit or online at ashevilleart.org/membership.
A Hand in Studio Craft: Harvey K. Littleton as Peer and Pioneer Exhibition
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Harvey K. Littleton, Amber Maze, 1968, blown glass, 8 3/4 × 10 1/2 × 6 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of Harvey K. Littleton.
Asheville, N.C.A Hand in Studio Craft: Harvey K. Littleton as Peer and Pioneer highlights recent gifts to the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection and loans from the family of glass artist Harvey K. Littleton. This exhibition places Harvey and Bess Littleton’s collection into the context of their lives, as they moved around the United States, connected with other artists, and developed their own work. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Whitney Richardson, associate curator—will be on view in the Judith S. Moore Gallery at the Museum from January 19 through June 27, 2022.

Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) founded the Studio Glass Movement in the United States in 1962 when, as a teacher, he instituted a glass art program at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, the first of its kind in the United States. He taught the next generation of glass artists—who taught the next—and his influence can still be seen today. But before he dedicated himself to the medium of glass, Littleton studied industrial design, ceramics, and metalwork at the University of Michigan and the Cranbrook Academy of Art in the late 1930s and early 1940s. He met his wife Bess Tamura Littleton, a painting student, at the University of Michigan. Over the course of their careers, Harvey and Bess collected artwork by their fellow artists and amassed an impressive collection from the early days of the Studio Glass Movement and the height of the American mid-century Studio Pottery Movement.

“This exhibition offers the viewer an exciting opportunity to see some of Harvey K. Littleton’s early work in ceramic and metal—directly from his family’s collection—before he began making art in glass,” says Whitney Richardson, associate curator. “Best known for his glassworks, those will be on display alongside the work of his students and his peers making clear the influence he had on them and the Studio Glass Movement.” 

A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Rhiannon Skye Tafoya (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians), Ul’nigid’, 2020, letterpress (photopolymer and Bembo & Cherokee Syllabary metal type) printed on handmade & color plan paper with paperweaving, closed: 11 × 11 ¼ inches, assembled: 23 ½ × 11 ¼ × 5 ⁵⁄₈ inches. Courtesy the Artist. © Rhiannon Skye Tafoya, image Rhiannon Skye Tafoya.
 Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art features over 50 works of art in a variety of media by 30+ Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) and Cherokee Nation artists. The exhibition highlights the use of the written Cherokee language, a syllabary developed by Cherokee innovator Sequoyah (circa 1776–1843). Cherokee syllabary is frequently found in the work of Cherokee artists as a compositional element or the subject matter of the work itself. The exhibition will be on view at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee, NC from June 12, 2021 to October 31, 2021, and in the Asheville Art Museum’s Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall from November 19, 2021 to March 14, 2022.

The Cherokee Syllabary is a system of writing developed by Sequoyah in the early 1800s prior to the Removal period. Through Sequoyah’s innovative work, Cherokee people embraced the writing system as an expedient form of communication and documentation. During the Removal period, the syllabary was used as a tactic to combat land dispossession. Cherokee people continue to use the syllabary as a form of cultural expression and pride, which is showcased in the contemporary artwork of the Cherokee Citizens in this exhibition.

“We’re pleased to host this gathering of works from contemporary Cherokee artists, who perfectly illustrate how our language is a living and evolving part of who we are. It’s moving to see how each artist finds inspiration in their own way from this language that connects us as Cherokee people,” said Shana Bushyhead Condill, executive director of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian.

“The Asheville Art Museum and the Museum of the Cherokee Indian have been long-term collaborators, and we are delighted to further our partnership by working together to manage an open call to Cherokee artists and subsequently curate this exciting exhibition of contemporary works that take inspiration from, celebrate, preserve and interpret the syllabary,” said Pamela L. Myers, executive director of the Asheville Art Museum. “On view at both museums, we hope the exhibition engages a wide and diverse audience in dialogue with these extraordinary works.”

A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art is organized by the Asheville Art Museum and Museum of the Cherokee Indian, and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator at the Asheville Art Museum, with assistance from curatorial consultant Joshua Adams (Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians). Special thanks to S. Dakota Brown, education director at the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, and Alexis Meldrum, curatorial assistant at the Asheville Art Museum, for their support in the planning of this exhibition. This project is made possible in part by a grant from the Blue Ridge National Heritage Area Partnership, and sponsored in part by the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron E. Click.

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians artists include Joshua Adams, Jody Lipscomb Bradley, Nathan Bush, Kane Crowe, John Henry Gloyne, Shan Goshorn, Luzene Hill, Christy Long, Louise Bigmeat Maney, Christopher McCoy, Tara McCoy, Joel Queen, Sean Ross, Jakeli Swimmer, Rhiannon Skye Tafoya, Mary Thompson, Stan Tooni Jr.,  Alica Wildcatt, and Fred Wilnoty.

Cherokee Nation artists include Roy Boney Jr., Jeff Edwards, Joseph Erb, Raychel Foster, Kenny Glass, Camilla McGinty, Jessica Mehta, America Meredith, Jane Osti, Lisa Rutherford, Janet L. Smith, Jennifer Thiessen, and Jennie Wilson.

About the Museum of the Cherokee Indian

Established in 1948, the Museum of the Cherokee Indian is one of the longest operating tribal museums. Recognized for its innovative storytelling, the Museum features exhibits, artwork, and hands-on technology that brings over 15,000 years of Cherokee history to life. Located in Cherokee, NC, the Museum is open daily except Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. Learn more by visiting mci.org.

Asheville Art Museum Acquires 25 New Artworks
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Christopher McCoy, Resilient Times, 2021, non-glare acrylic on DiBond metallic print, 36 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by Ray Griffin & Thom Robinson. © Christopher McCoy.
Asheville, N.C.—The generosity of the Museum’s Collectors’ Circle members and additional contributors enabled the Asheville Art Museum to acquire 25 new artworks for its Collection at the end of 2021. The Museum welcomes artworks created throughout the 20th and 21st centuries in a range of media by both regionally and nationally recognized artists. These artists include Peggy Bacon, Lynda Benglis, Sanford Biggers, Terry Haass, George Morrison, Robert Motherwell, Marilyn Pappas, David Stewart, Ansei Uchima, and Asheville-based Liz Williams.

A highlight of this year’s Collectors’ Circle acquisitions is a grouping of works by artists featured in the exhibition A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art, on view at the Asheville Art Museum through March 14, 2022. This exhibition was co-organized with the Museum of the Cherokee Indian in Cherokee, NC. The curatorial team identified the 14 artworks by artists of the Cherokee Nation or Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians not yet represented in the Collection to augment not only the Museum’s contemporary holdings but also the holdings of Cherokee artists working today. Artists represented in this acquisition include John Henry Gloyne, Christopher McCoy, Tara McCoy, Rhiannon Skye Tafoya, Jakeli Swimmer, and Alica Murphy Wildcatt of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and Jeff Edwards, Kenny Glass, and Jennie Wilson of the Cherokee Nation. These artworks contribute directly to the Museum’s commitment to collecting from and supporting contemporary Indigenous artists, especially those with connections to the unceded land upon which the Museum sits. “Through a vibrant array of materials, colors, and perspectives, the Cherokee syllabary finds an evocative, contemporary form of expression at the hands of the artists in this exhibition,” said Assistant Curator Hilary Schroeder of this group of work. “There is a power in words, both written and spoken. I often find that power to be amplified in a work of art, when those words are placed in the context of composition, symbolism, and an artist’s intent.” Visit ashevilleart.org/exhibitions/a-living-language to learn more about this exhibition.

The Museum’s Collectors’ Circle is a specialized group formed to encourage the exchange of ideas and interests, art learning, connoisseurship, and collecting. The group supports the proactive development, stewardship, and conservation of the Museum’s Collection. The Museum is grateful for these new year-end acquisitions, which add to the strengths of its holdings, and looks forward to sharing them with the community of Western North Carolina and its visitors in the years to come.

The following 25 works have been acquired for the Museum’s Collection: 

Peggy Bacon, Day-Nursery, 1918, drypoint on paper, 6 × 8 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle member Susan Holden. © Estate of Peggy Bacon.

Lynda Benglis, Tandem Series #10, 1988, relief, hand-painted watercolor, monoprint on paper, 38 1/2 × 24 1/2 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Gary Greener & Bret McAllister. © Lynda Benglis.

Sanford Biggers, The Pasts They Brought With Them from The Floating Worlds series, 2013, paper collage and silkscreen with hand-coloring on rag paper, edition 29/30, publisher: LeRoy Neiman Center for Print Studies, 27 1/2 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Joey Gigliotti and Steven Gigliotti. © Sanford Biggers.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art  
Jeff Edwards, Speaking With Our Ancestors, 2013, archival inkjet print on paper, edition 7/50, 30 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron E. Click. © Jeff Edwards.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art  
Jeff Edwards, Tsalagiopoly, 2013, archival inkjet print on paper, edition 6/50, 30 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Ladene & Russell Newton. © Jeff Edwards.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art  
Kenny Glass, ᏕᏣᎵᎬᏚᎴᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏕᏣᎵᏴᏑᎴᏍᏗ (Wear Your Mask), 2020, seed beads, trade beads, brass beads, bias tape, thimbles, wool, and cotton, 42 × 14 1/2 × 5 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Ann & Jon Kemske. © Kenny Glass.

John Henry Gloyne, Osd nvwoti, 2020, acrylic on illustration board, 30 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Butch & Kathy Patrick. © John Henry Gloyne.

John Henry Gloyne, Uk’tena, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 24 × 24 × 1 1/2 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by Ray Griffin & Thom Robinson. © John Henry Gloyne.

Terry Haass, Last Snow, 1949, color woodcut on paper, image: 14 ¼ × 10 5/8 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle member Susan Holden. © Estate of Terry Haass.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Jody Bradley Lipscomb, A Meeting of Minds, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 10 × 30 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Ladene & Russell Newton. © Jody Bradley Lipscomb.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Christopher McCoy, Resilient Times, 2021, non-glare acrylic on DiBond metallic print, 36 × 24 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by Ray Griffin & Thom Robinson. © Christopher McCoy.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Tara McCoy, Syllabary Pot, 2021, red earthen clay, 7 × 30 × 7 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron E. Click. © Tara McCoy.

George Morrison, Untitled, 1958, gouache on paper, 17 × 22 inches. 2021 Collectors’ Circle purchase with additional funds provided by Bernadette & Miles Bender, Anne & Nat Burkhardt, Jeff & Linda Fromson, Frances Myers, Len & Mary Ellen Porter, Cherry & Paul Lentz Saenger, Judy Upjohn, Barbara & Mike Walker, and Jim Wilson & Lynne Poirier-Wilson. © Estate of George Morrison.

Robert Motherwell, Untitled from Lyric Suite, 1965, black ink with orange bleed on paper, 9 × 11 inches. 2021 Collectors’ Circle purchase with additional funds provided by Bernadette & Miles Bender, Anne & Nat Burkhardt, Jeff & Linda Fromson, Len & Mary Ellen Porter, Cherry & Paul Lentz Saenger, Judy Upjohn, and Jim Wilson & Lynne Poirier-Wilson. © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Robert Motherwell, Untitled from Lyric Suite, 1965, black ink with blue pigment and orange bleed on paper, 9 × 11 inches. 2021 Collectors’ Circle purchase with additional funds provided by Bernadette & Miles Bender, Anne & Nat Burkhardt, Jeff & Linda Fromson, Len & Mary Ellen Porter, Cherry & Paul Lentz Saenger, Judy Upjohn, and Jim Wilson & Lynne Poirier-Wilson. © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Marilyn Pappas, Seated Muse with Sphere from Fragments series, 1999, draped and stitched cotton on linen, 30 × 27 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle member Steven Gigliotti and Renee Danger James. © Marilyn Pappas.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Rhiannon Skye Tafoya, Ul’nigid, 2020, letterpress on handmade and Colorplan paper with paper weaving, closed: 11 x 11 1/4 inches, assembled: 23 1/2 x 11 1/4 x 5 5/8 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron Click. © Rhiannon Skye Tafoya.

David Stewart, Saint George and the Dragon, circa 1965, incised and glazed earthenware, 7 5/8 × 10 × 10 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Olivia & Gary Zahler. © David Stewart.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Jakeli Swimmer, EGWA: The Gluttonous Warrior, 2020 (printed 2021), archival inkjet print on paper, edition 1/1, 20 x 16 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron Click. © Jakeli Swimmer.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Jakeli Swimmer, Missed Me!, 2020 (printed 2021), archival inkjet print on paper, edition 1/1, 20 x 16 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron Click. © Jakeli Swimmer.

Ansei Uchima, Descending Moon, 1963, color woodcut on paper, edition: Artist proof, 16 × 4 3/4 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle member Lyn McFarland. © Estate of Ansei Uchima.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Alica Murphy Wildcatt, Something Else necklace, 2020, hand-sawn sterling silver, 20-inch length chain. Museum purchase with funds provided by M. J. Teaford & R. K. Benites. © Alica Murphy Wildcatt.

Liz Williams, Know Your Worth from the Remember to Look Up series, 2020, inkjet archival print on paper, edition 1/10, 24 × 33 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Tom Butler & Marilyn Laufer in honor of Frances Myers and the Nat C. Myers Fund for Photography. © Liz Williams.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Jennie Wilson, ᎣᏪᏅ Ꮢ ᎠᏐᏅ Ꮕ (owenvsv asonvnv), 2020, wood, gourds, cornhusks, fur, wire, sinew, and alcohol inks, 6 1/2 × 15 1/2 × 8 1/2 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Ladene & Russell Newton. © Jennie Wilson.

Featured in A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art 
Jennie Wilson, Cherokee Months, 2019, gourds, alcohol inks, copper leaf, and wood burning, 11 1/2 × 9 1/2 × 9 1/2 inches. Museum purchase with funds provided by 2021 Collectors’ Circle members Kevin Click & April Liou in memory of Myron Click. © Jennie Wilson.

Asheville Gallery of Art January 2022 Exhibit, “Mountain Inspirations”
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Gallery of Art

Asheville Gallery of Art’s January show, “Mountain Inspirations” will feature works by three new gallery members: Jan Smith, Mandy Kjellstrom, and Raymond Byram. The show will run January 2-31 during gallery hours, 11am-6pm. An event to meet the artists will be held at the gallery on First Friday, January 7, from 5-8pm at 82 Patton Avenue.

Jan has been a professional artist for forty years, and her body of work has evolved over years of experimentation with different materials and techniques. Oil is her medium of choice, and she paints both from photographs and on location. Her style approaches a hybrid impressionistic/realism in her landscapes and traditional realism in her animals, people, and florals. Throughout her career, she has participated in numerous gallery showings. Jan has lived both on the coast and in the mountains of the Carolinas so it comes as no surprise that she transforms the canvas with the familiar beauty of mountain and coastal scenes.

Mandy Kjellstrom commenced her study of art in 2002, and later entered the Fine Arts League of the Carolinas, a school devoted to classical realism. This began her training, with specific interests in the figure, landscapes, and still life, which she continues to study. She finds joy in painting the ordinary things of life in a way that captures their sacredness. Believing that God is present in all things, she considers herself a “co-creator” of the beauty that she experiences as she paints her natural surroundings “en plein air.” Mandy’s preferred medium is oil, in a classical realism style, and she is inspired by the world’s ever-present natural beauty.

Raymond Byram has been painting in oils since 1969. After receiving a Fine Arts degree with a minor in art history, he has devoted his life to his painting and printmaking. Although he has worked in a variety of genres and styles, landscapes in oil are his primary pursuits. Byram’s oils are almost exclusively done with palette knives, rather than brushes. Ray enjoys both an Impressionistic style of painting, as well as the beauty of the mountains and forests. Combined, they have molded his style into what he calls Tight Impressionism. Ray finds his inspiration in the eastern mountains and forests of North Carolina.

For further information about this show, please contact the Asheville Gallery of Art at (828) 251-5796, visit the gallery’s website at www.ashevillegallery-of-art.com, or go to the gallery’s Facebook page.

January 2nd to January 31, Daily from 11am to 6pm

MAGNETIC U SPEAK THE SPEECH Taught by Melon Wedick
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – Mar 19 @ 2:00 pm
Magnetic Theatre

Speak the Speech is an 8-week deep dive into the technical fundamentals that will allow you to speak Shakespeare with accuracy and clarity. Skills covered include:

  • Paraphrasing for accurate understanding
  • De-constructing and understanding Shakespeare’s grammar and syntax
  • Identifying operative phrases and key words to unlock the audience’s understanding
  • Physical and vocal techniques for clarity
  • Developing and deepening imagery
  • Using scansion to discover hints to pacing, character, and unwritten stage directions
  • Memorizing meaning rather than speech patterns, for flexible, spontaneous, and responsive performance

The first four weeks of this course focus on tools for comprehension and speech, with an emphasis on prose. The second four weeks move on to verse, combining skills from the first half of class with scansion and deeper image work.

Students who took an abbreviated version of the class in the fall of 2021 said:

“I gained a significant amount of information from it. The format was incredible and I have come away from it with a better understanding of Shakespeare.“

“Instructor’s knowledge, command of material, keen observational skills, and specific, articulate feedback made the class engaging and useful.”

“It was interesting to see the other people’s work evolve as they used the tools learned in class.”

“The two hours flew by and I often wished we could keep working past stop time.”

 

Ages 16 and Up

Bio for the Instructor:

Melon Wedick studied theatre (and philosophy!) at Oberlin College. She studied Shakespeare performance with Paul Moser and Hal Ryder, and was a founding member of the Certain Players (Randolph, VT) and founding co-director of the Greenville Shakespeare Festival (Greenville, NH). She has performed with the Certain Players, Greenville Shakespeare Festival (NH), Black River Theatre Company, Shakespeare NYC, and the Montford Park Players, among others, and has directed productions of Hamlet, Measure for Measure, and Coriolanus. Now the artistic director of Nemesis Theatre Company, Melon is passionate about clarity and comprehension in Shakespeare performance.

Ruminations on Memory Exhibition
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Robert Rauschenberg, John from the Ruminations series, 1999, photogravure on paper, edition 3/46, publisher: Universal Limited Art Editions, Bay Shore, NY, 29 ½ × 38 7/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation / VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Ruminations on Memory contends with the act of remembrance and reflection, featuring a rare presentation of all nine prints from Robert Rauschenberg’s Ruminations portfolio, Judy Chicago’s Retrospective in a Box portfolio, and selections from the Museum’s Collection. Organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator, this exhibition will be on view in Appleby Foundation Exhibition Hall at the Museum from November 19, 2021 through March 14, 2022 in conjunction with A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art

Artworks are vessels for processing, recalling, and reflecting on the past. Artists often draw upon materials from their own pasts and grasp at fleeting moments in time in the creation of an object. For the viewer, observation of an artwork can draw out personal memories.

Artworks in a variety of media explore various ways of remembering, including individual memories that focus on the moments from an artist’s past; generational memory that looks back to one’s ancestors, whether recent or long past; and collective memory, wherein in an image might evoke bygone times that balance between constructed and real. Through these artworks that ruminate upon the past, viewers may discover the stirrings of their own thoughts and recollections prompted by the works before them.

Ruminations on Memory offers a unique opportunity to experience the entirety of a major print portfolio by American painter Robert Rauschenberg (Port Arthur, TX 1925–2008 Captiva, FL). Rauschenberg was a student at Black Mountain College in NC for the 1948–1949 and 1951–1952 academic sessions and for the 1951 and 1952 summers. His Ruminations series consists of nine color photogravures which were printed in 1999 and reflect on Rauschenberg’s early life, his friends and family, and the memories he held dear. The series represents especially significant mature work by Rauschenberg that looks back to his most formative moments as an artist including his time at Black Mountain College and the friendships and ideas formed there.

Also presented in the exhibition is an important series of prints by Judy Chicago (born Chicago, IL 1939). Five decades into her career, Chicago stands as one of the foremost artists of the 20th and 21st centuries, having committed to socially minded work, uplifting in particular experiences salient to her feminine and Jewish identities. Retrospective in a Box consists of seven prints and a portfolio created in collaboration with the master printers at Landfall Press, and provides an overview of her major motifs and ideas, including the print Spring the Dinner, a nod to her seminal 1979 work The Dinner Party.

In addition to the artworks from the Museum’s Collection, visitors will be able to experience Felix Gonzales-Torres’s “Untitled” (L.A.), on loan from the Art Bridges collection. “Untitled” (L.A.) is one of the artist’s iconic interactive candy installations where memories are engaged not only through sight but through sound, touch, taste, and smell as well.

Learn more about Ruminations on Memory and A Living Language: Cherokee Syllabary and Contemporary Art at ashevilleart.org.

Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton Exhibition
Jan 28 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
 
Left: Thermon Statom, Frankincense, 1999, siligraphy from glass plate with digital transfer on BFK Rives paper, edition 50/50, 36 1/4 × 29 3/8 inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Thermon Statom. | Right: Dale Chihuly, Suite of Ten Prints: Chandelier, 1994, 4-color intaglio from glass plate on BRK Rives paper, edition 34/50, image: 29 ½ × 23 ½ inches, sheet: 36 × 29 ½ inches. Asheville Art Museum. © Dale Chihuly / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Asheville, N.C.—The selection of works from the Asheville Art Museum’s Collection presented in Stained with Glass: Vitreograph Prints from the Studio of Harvey K. Littleton features imagery that recreates the sensation and colors of stained glass. The exhibition showcases Littleton and the range of makers who worked with him, including Dale Chihuly, Cynthia Bringle, Thermon Statom, and more. This exhibition—organized by the Asheville Art Museum and curated by Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator—will be on view in The Van Winkle Law Firm Gallery at the Museum from January 12 through May 23, 2022.

In 1974 Harvey K. Littleton (Corning, NY 1922–2013 Spruce Pine, NC) developed a process for using glass to create prints on paper. Littleton, who began as a ceramicist and became a leading figure in the American Studio Glass Movement, expanded his curiosity around the experimental potential of glass into innovations in the world of printmaking. A wide circle of artists in a variety of media—including glass, ceramics, and painting—were invited to Littleton’s studio in Spruce Pine, NC, to create prints using the vitreograph process developed by Littleton. Upending notions of both traditional glassmaking and printmaking, vitreographs innovatively combine the two into something new. The resulting prints created through a process of etched glass, ink, and paper create rich, colorful scenes reminiscent of luminous stained glass.

“Printmaking is a medium that many artists explore at some point in their career,” says Hilary Schroeder, assistant curator. “The process is often collaborative, as they may find themselves working with a print studio and highly skilled printmaker. The medium can also be quite experimental. Harvey Littleton’s contribution to the field is very much so in this spirit, as seen in his incorporation of glass and his invitation to artists who might otherwise not have explored works on paper. Through this exhibition, we are able to appreciate how the artists bring their work in clay, glass, or paint to ink and paper.” 

Winter Photo Contest – “Winter Trees”
Jan 28 @ 12:00 pm – 11:45 pm
Chimney Rock State Park

Image result for Chimney Rock Park

It’s the Year of the Tree in North Carolina State Parks, and we are encouraging guests to celebrate trees all year long! Start off in the winter months while branches are bare and capture some unique tree shapes or the beauty of frosty evergreens. You may win a prize for your efforts!

GREAT PRIZES WILL BE AWARDED TO 3 WINNING ENTRIES

1st Prize: The winning photo will be our Facebook cover photo for two weeks, and the photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park, two boat tour tickets from Lake Lure Tours, and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

2nd Prize: After the first place photo, the second place photo will be our Facebook cover photo for one week. The photographer will receive two annual passes to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

3rd Prize: The third place photographer will receive two adult day passes (or one family pack of day passes) to Chimney Rock State Park and dinner for two at the Old Rock Café.

CONTEST RULES:

  1. There is no fee to enter the contest. All photographs must be taken of Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park only in areas accessible to guests between January 1, 2022 – February 28, 2022.
    The contest is open to amateur and professional photographers.
  2. Up to three photos per person can be submitted via any of the following ways to be eligible to win:
    • Facebook: First, like the Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park page. Next, send us a private message including your contact information specified in rule #3.
    • E-mail: If you don’t have access to social media, you may email your digital photo with your contact information specified in rule #3 to [email protected]
  3. Every entry should be clearly labeled with the photographer’s name, city & state, a brief photo caption, an email address and the best phone number to reach you.
  4. Photos should be available at a minimum resolution of 1200 x 1600 pixels (1 MB minimum) to be eligible to win. Photos taken via smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices are welcome if they meet minimum requirements.
  5. For entries showing human faces, you must list their name(s) and have written permission from any photographed person(s) to use their image.
  6. Entries should reflect the photographer’s interpretation of the theme. Emphasis will be placed on quality, composition and creativity. All entries may be used in promotions of Chimney Rock and park-related activities.
  7. Digital images can be optimized but not dramatically altered with photo editing software. Black and white photographs are welcome.
  8. Finalists will be chosen by Chimney Rock staff and the winner will be voted on by the public. Decisions regarding winners are final.

Winners will be notified personally and announced on Chimney Rock’s social media. For more information, call 1-828-625-9611, ext. 1812 or email us at [email protected].

What If We Gather at the Botanical Gardens and Stare At Clouds While We Dance With Plants
Jan 28 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Botanical Gardens at Asheville

What if we gathered at the Botanical Gardens, stared up at the clouds, and danced with plants? Maybe we will tell a joke. Maybe we will draw each other’s portraits. Maybe we will discuss what the clouds look like. Maybe we will share some strawberries. Maybe we will stretch together. Maybe we will write a song together. Maybe we will just look at each other, sharing space, breathing the same air.

Multidisciplinary Performance Artist, Mike Durkin, will lead a participatory mediative performance where audience members will gather, share space, tour the grounds, dance, and find a deeper connection between the variety of environments and worlds we occupy on a day-to-day basis.

The experience, located on the grounds of the Botanical Gardens on UNC Asheville’s campus, will last approximately 75 minutes and will have periods of walking, dancing, and other activities. Plan on wearing hiking attire, clothes you can move in, and complimentary tea will be served during the experience. Audience members can participate in as much or as little as they are comfortable with. All movements and activities require very little exertion.

A special zoom performance will be held on Saturday 1/22 for individuals to gather, share space, and dance with plants across the interwebs. Performances on Saturday 1/29 and Sunday 1/30 at 3pm are part of the Asheville Fringe Festival.

Email [email protected] for reservations for performances 1/22-1/27
Buy tickets at www.ashevillefringe.org for the Saturday 1/29 and Sunday 1/30 performances, available January 1st.

For More Information, www.mikedurkin.info

Follow him on Instagram: @MikeDurkinProjects

Dirty Laundry at the Wortham Center for the Performing Arts
Jan 28 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Wortham Center for the Performing Arts

Stewart/Owen Dance debuts a genre-bending new show, Dirty Laundry, this January in Asheville. Prepare to be engrossed in live dance, encircled by multimedia and enthralled by provocative spoken word. Experience an unexpected story of marriage, divorce, and reclamation at Wortham Center for the Performing Arts. Shows run Jan. 21-23 and 28-30 with ten opportunities to catch this intimate performance. Tickets: $27. Box office: 828-257-4530 or worthamarts.org. Note: This performance uses explicit language describing adult situations. Recommended for ages 16+.

Classic World Cinema at Flood Gallery
Jan 28 @ 8:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Flood Gallery

Open donation. 

Saturday, January 29, 2022
2022 Season Hendersonville Theatre on sale Now!
Jan 29 all-day
Hendersonville Theatre

ON SALE NOVEMBER 26, 2021

Because we know that everyone’s schedules are different, Hendersonville Theatre offers four excellent Season Ticket packages that will get you the best seats in the house and save you money.

SHOWS INCLUDED IN THIS PACKAGE:

Nunsense Jamboree
Red, White & Tuna
25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
The Haunting of Hill House
Five Carols for Christmas & JingleJacks

Art Grant: Arts Build Community
Jan 29 all-day
online

Apply by 2/14 | $500-2,500 grants for arts-based community projects. Priority will be given to projects based in low-income neighborhoods, Title 1 public schools, and communities in need.

BE THE CHANGE, BUY A MURAL
Jan 29 all-day
online

Buy one of these murals for yourself or to donate to a local organization (make sure you check with them first), and keep the good work going! All proceeds from this auction will be split evenly between The Martin Luther King, Jr. Association of Asheville and Buncombe County’s COPE Program and the Asheville Area Arts Council’s Arts Build Community Grant. Auction ends February 28.

Following the murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis, MN, on May 25, 2020, protests broke out across the nation. Floyd was killed after a white police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly 9 minutes. In response, hundreds of protestors gathered in downtown Asheville from May 29- June 6, 2020, with cries for justice and change.

During this time, Lowe’s Home Improvement generously donated plywood for downtown business owners to cover their storefronts while Asheville had its own reckoning. Business owners and artists seized this opportunity to lend their support for needed changes by painting murals on the plywood covering downtown businesses. Local muralists Gus Cutty, Kathryn Crawford, and Dustin Spagnola were the driving force behind this initiative.

When it came time for the murals to come down, local artists Evar Hecht and Ben Nelson had the foresight to collect and temporarily store these works, gathering over 150 pieces of plywood. The Asheville Area Arts Council, with the help of Dogwood Health Trust, then stepped in to move the murals to a secure, climate-controlled storage facility and worked with Aisha Adams of Equity Over Everything to determine next steps.

After several COVID setbacks, the arts council is proud to have partnered with the Martin Luther King Jr Association of Asheville and Buncombe County to present this virtual exhibition, auction and speaker series. It is our hope that the proceeds from the auction will support continued change and healing  in our community.

Thank you to Dogwood Health Trust for generously providing the funding to make this project possible, and to the artists and business owners for donating their time and energy to capture this moment in our history.

A video about the exhibition is featured as part of the 41st Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commemoration.

Curatorial Fellowship
Jan 29 all-day
online with Center for Craft

Fellowship program supporting emerging craft curators to explore and test new ideas about craft.

Details

  • Award Amount:
  • Up to $5,000
  • Grant Period:
  • Through 2023

Timeline

  • Applications Open:
  • Nov 16, 2021
  • Orientation:
  • January 14, 2022
  • Deadline:
  • Feb 14, 2022
  • Notification:
  • Apr 2022
  • Grant Period begins:
  • May 2022
  • Grant Period ends:
  • Through 2023
Flat Rock Playhouse’s 2022 Season
Jan 29 all-day
Flat Rock Playhouse

This year will feature an exhilarating blend of beloved productions, including Million Dollar Quartet, West Side Story, and Mamma Mia! The popular Music on the Rock® series, Studio 52 Family Programming, and a brand new Black Box series round out the 2022 season and mark a renewed beginning for FRP after a long pandemic shutdown.

 

Season subscriptions are on sale now. Music on the Rock® single tickets go on sale on January 24, 2022, and single tickets for all remaining shows go on sale on February 14, 2022.

 

The Music of Tom Petty

Feb. 24-March 5

 

Two Jews, Talking

A Hilarious Staged Reading

March 17-19

A side-splitting piece written by Ed. Weinberger, our characters take us on a rollicking romp through time! The two-act story brings Lou and Bud together in the Biblical past, and Phil and Marty together in contemporary Long Island. They philosophize about women, sex, food, the divine, and destiny in this tale of companionship and friendship.

 

The Music of Elton John

March 31-April 2

 

The Music of Neil Diamond

April 7-10

 

Catch Me If You Can

April 28-May 14

This comedy thriller is a classic gem with exciting twists and turns from beginning to end. “The final 15 minutes will reward you like a murder mystery should.” The New York Times

 

Million Dollar Quartet

May 20-June 19

Back by popular demand, the musical celebrates the historic Sam Phillips studio recording sessions of Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, and Elvis Presley.

 

The Music of the Eagles

An Outdoor Stadium Concert

June 18

Join Flat Rock Playhouse for another rockin’ evening of outdoor summer fun at West Henderson’s Athletic Stadium, Johnson Field.

 

West Side Story

July 1-30

The Romeo and Juliet inspired love story of Tony and Maria amid the Jets and Sharks gang rivalry. Ranked #1 in the most recent survey of theatre patrons.

 

Mozart to Pop Chart

The Musical Story Continues

August 5-13

Nat Zegree (Jerry Lee Lewis/Amadeus) is back to whisk you away on an all-new musical journey through the history and triumphs of music from Mozart to today’s current hits. Featuring many of the local region’s best rock and symphonic musicians!

 

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

August 19-Sept. 4

Don’t miss this fresh and relevant stage adaptation of the iconic film that starred the inimitable and great Sidney Poitier.

 


 

Introducing The Black Box Series.

September 15-October 9

 You’ve never experienced a play on The Rock like before. The audience and artists share the MainStage for an intimate and immersive theatre experience.  The Black Box Series will feature contemporary works, classics, and stories and playwrights from around the globe. Be among the first to join us on this new and exciting theatrical journey!

 

God of Carnage

Sept. 15-Oct. 8

A triple-Tony Award-winning Broadway sensation the New Yorker called “laugh-out-loud hilarity,” and “ninety minutes of sustained mayhem.”

 

Blood Knot

Sept. 16-Oct. 9

A play that asks us to dig beneath the surface of what makes us kin and what happens when we don’t like what we find there. By renowned South African playwright Athol Fugard.

 


 

Mamma Mia!

Encore Performance

Oct. 21-Nov. 13

The hugely popular mega-Broadway hit featuring the music of ABBA is back for an encore performance. Featuring songs like “Dancing Queen,” “Gimme! Gimme! Gimme!,” “Honey Honey” and so many more.

 

A Flat Rock Playhouse Christmas

November 25-December 22

The WNC tradition continues. Same great show, all new material. A Playhouse favorite that will leave you feeling merry and bright!

 

A Charlie Brown Christmas (Studio 52)

December 1-4

Everyone’s favorite holiday classic comes to life in a spectacular new production of A Charlie Brown Christmas. Adapted from Charles M. Schulz’s timeless story the whole family can enjoy. Join Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, and the whole Peanuts gang as they sing, dance, and learn the true meaning of Christmas!

 

To learn more about the 2022 lineup and how to purchase your tickets, please visit the website at www.flatrockplayhouse.org.

 

FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE

 

In 1937, a group of struggling performers, led by Robroy Farquhar, organized themselves as the Vagabond Players. The Vagabonds worked in a variety of places over the course of three years, and in 1940 found themselves in the Blue Ridge region of Western North Carolina. The local and tourist community welcomed them with open arms when they presented their first summer season of plays in a 150-year-old grist mill they converted into The Old Mill Playhouse at Highland Lake. So successful was that summer, they returned in 1941. After WWII, the Vagabond Players reorganized came back to the region and opened a playhouse in nearby Lake Summit. The Lake Summit Playhouse thrived during the post-war years and soon the Vagabond Players were looking for a larger and permanent home. In 1952, the troupe of performers, and a newly formed board of directors made an offer to buy an 8-acre lot in the Village of Flat Rock. This new home made the Vagabonds “locals” and a rented big top gave birth to Flat Rock Playhouse. As the beautiful Western Carolina region continued to grow, so did the Playhouse and in 1961, by Act of the North Carolina General Assembly, Flat Rock Playhouse was officially designated The State Theatre of North Carolina. What began as a few weeks of summer performances in 1940 is now a nine-month season of plays including Broadway musicals, comedy, drama, and theatre for young audiences. The Playhouse’s dual mission of producing the performing arts and providing education in the performing arts includes a professional series; a summer and fall college apprentice and intern program; and Studio 52, year-round classes and workshops in theatre and film for students from kindergarten through adults. Flat Rock Playhouse now hosts over 98,000 patrons annually and is a significant contributor to the local economy and the Arts in North Carolina.

# # #

 

Student Poetry Contest – “Ambition”
Jan 29 all-day
online

January through April

Actors performing Sandburg's works on stageActors portray characters from Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Story “Three Boys with Jugs of Molasses and Secret Ambitions.”

NPS Photo

Educators in grades 3-12 are invited to submit original poems written by their students in February. The poems will be judged and winners announced in April. Find the 2022 Poetry Contest Information and submission guidelines here. The theme “Ambition” is from one of Carl Sandburg’s Rootabaga Stories, to celebrate it’s 100th year of being published. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.”

Students are invited to submit a poem to Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site’s annual Student Poetry Contest. The contest encourages youth to explore writing their own poetry, and is open to students nationwide!

Submissions are accepted from grades 3-12 and must be postmarked by March 1, 2022. See below for submission rules.

Winners will be notified by April 8, 2022, and will be invited to participate in a special virtual program on April 22.


2022 Contest Rules

Theme – “Ambition”
Carl Sandburg wrote millions of words reflecting on the American experience of the 20th century. Though his words often focused on war, labor, and social injustice, as a father of three, he also wrote imaginative, zany, and fantastical children’s stories, called “Rootabaga Stories.” Carl Sandburg’s “Rootabaga Stories” were first published in 1922 and celebrate 100 years of entertaining readers of all ages this year. The theme “Ambition” is from one of these stories. “An ambition…creeps in your heart night and day, singing a little song, ‘Come and find me, come and find me.” Read the story here.

Poems submitted for the 2022 contest should reflect the theme of “Ambition.” By definition, a strong desire to do or to achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work. Or setting goals to achieve success.

Submission Rules

  • Poetry accepted from 3-12th grades only. Poems will be grouped for judging by 3-5th, 6-8th, and 9-12th.
  • Poems must be submitted by a teacher (traditional classroom or homeschool teacher).
  • No more than three poems per class. Teachers with multiple classes, can submit up to three poems per class period.
  • Poem will be judged on its ability to communicate the theme.
  • Poem can be written in any style, but must not exceed one-page in length. No illustrations.
  • Poems must be typed, no handwritten entries, using standard computer fonts, like Times, Arial, etc…
  • Do not place any identifying information (name, school, grade, etc…) on poem sheet, that will go on the accompanying submission form.
  • Submission form must be complete to be accepted:
    • Paperclipped to poem, no staples
    • Must be signed by parent, student and teacher
    • Submissions must be postmarked, faxed, or e-mailed to [email protected], by March 1, 2022. Emailed submissions must be docs, .pdfs or scans. Low resolution pictures of the submission will not be accepted.

Judging
Judges from the literary community will make the decision for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place within each grade category (3-5th, 6-8th, 9-12th).

Poetry Partners
The 2022 Poetry Contest is a result of tremendous community support including the Friends of Carl Sandburg at Connemara, and literary volunteers who serve as judges. Thank you.

Poetry Resources
You may also find curriculum resources to use in the classroom at the park’s website: www.nps.gov/carl/learn/education/index.htm.

Send Submissions to:
Carl Sandburg Home NHS
Attn: Poetry Contest
81 Carl Sandburg Lane
Flat Rock, North Carolina 28731
Fax 828-693-4179
Email: [email protected]