Browse through upcoming arts and theater events in Asheville, NC, including Broadway shows, musicals, plays, operas, and more.

Sunday, April 14, 2024
“Making Changes” Exhibition
Apr 14 – May 13 all-day
Red House Gallery & Studios

Our first show in our new location, 101 Cherry Street, will emphasize how we have adapted to “Making Changes”. Growth occurs when we make changes. When something is deconstructed and recreated with new energy and life, it’s an opportunity to evolve and transform. In this process, some aspects are left behind while new concepts take their place. Growth is universal and can be planned or spontaneous, inclusive or exclusive, material, spiritual, or social. Take this challenge to break from old constructs and explore the previously unknown – the unawakened. “If we don’t change, we don’t grow. If we don’t grow, we aren’t really living.” — Gail Sheehy. All mediums are welcome.

Caroline Renée Woolard Art Exhibition
Apr 14 – May 24 all-day
The Village Potters Clay Center 

 

 

The Village Potters Clay Center is pleased to announce our first Featured Artist Exhibit for 2024 will be for Caroline Renée Woolard. The exhibit opened March 20 and runs through the end of May in the Feature Gallery at The Village Potters Clay Center.

 

Caroline Renée Woolard creates functional pottery with the intention of nurturing those who use it in their daily rituals, uplifting their spirits and homes as it invites them to find gratitude in the present moment. Her work explores movement through various textures on the surface with slip and carving, while finding stability and structure within the form. Each surface design is a unique expression of the energy of the moment that she creates it, and as she works with clay, she finds it to be a grounding process that reminds her of the importance of being centered and present.

 

The exhibit will include some of Caroline’s most popular forms like her mushroom mugs and vessels, her curvaceous lady forms, and her slipped vessels adorned with horsehair. She will also be creating new, larger pieces as she continues to explore the new directions her forms and textures are leading her, and we are all very excited to be along on her journey!

 

Caroline will also be taking part in the annual Multi-Kiln Opening Celebration at The Village Potters Clay Center on Saturday, May 4, where she will be demonstrating some of her surface design techniques and available throughout the day for questions and discussion about her work.

Great Smokies Writing Program | Utilizing the Visual Arts in Writing and Revising Personal Narrative
Apr 14 – Apr 17 all-day
Story Parlor

Wednesdays, starting March 20 | Offered through the Great Smokies Writing Program, this five-week class will investigate the ways in which paintings, drawings, photographs, and sculpture inspire, collaborate with, and complement our writing process.

Sanctuary of Stuff’s 20th Anniversary
Apr 14 – Apr 30 all-day
Sanctuary Of Stuff

20 Days of Sip & Shop
20 Raffles
20 Door Prices
20% off Entire purchase 10:30 until 1:00 daily*
20% off one item per purchase*
*Excluding yard art and new garden benches

Slice of Life Comedy Open Mic + Feature Comedy
Apr 14 all-day
Asheville Pizza & Brewing Co

Sunday April 14 Standup Comedy at Asheville Pizza & Brewing Company hosted by Hilliary Begley with Derek Boskovich, James Rocco & Jordan Smith featuring and a professional comedy open mic. Get dinner drinks and laughs. Tickets at https://www.ashevillebrewing.com/buy-tickets

Spring Photo Contest: “Spring Inspiration”
Apr 14 – May 31 all-day
Chimney Rock at Chimney Rock State Park
Cost: Included with Park admission.
Short Stories, Linda Gritta Solo Exhibition
Apr 14 @ 10:00 am – Apr 30 @ 6:00 pm
Bender Gallery
Short Stories, Linda Gritta Solo Exhibition

Exhibition Dates April 6 – April 30, 2024

Opening Reception April 6th, 5-8pm

Bender Gallery is excited to announce our first exhibition of 2024, Short Stories, a solo exhibition of new paintings by Linda Gritta. We will have the opening reception for Short Stories on April 6th from 5-8pm. Gritta has been hard at work on many new large paintings. All the paintings are an exploration of color with the desire to create a world that allows the viewer a short refuge from reality. These large works are immersive and begging to be explored.

Above image: Improv Three, mixed media on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

Youth Acting: Basic to Intermediate
Apr 14 @ 4:30 pm – May 13 @ 6:00 pm
Hendersonville Theatre

Teacher: Mike Yow

Class cost: $150

Min students: 6

Max students: 15

Class Dates: Mondays, April 8 – May 13 (6 weeks)

Time: 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Ages: 11-17 (Middle and High School students)

Location: Hendersonville Theatre Auditorium

Restrictions/Special Needs: Just comfortable clothing and footwear for light to moderate movement.

Prerequisites: Just a willingness to learn the essentials of being a skilled and entertaining thespian.

Refund Policy: The last day to receive a full refund* is March 4, 2024. After this date, no refund will be issued.

*Refunds are for tuition only and are at the discretion of the Class Teacher and Education Director. All taxes and fees are final and cannot be refunded.

Class Description:
In this class, students will learn the basics of stage (and film) acting, starting from simple stage directions and vocal projection to monologue, cold readings, improv techniques, and more.

For more information and to register, visit www.hendersonvilletheatre.org

Crafting with Cricut
Apr 14 @ 6:00 pm – May 8 @ 8:00 pm
Stephens-Lee Community Center

Make a new craft each month using your Cricut!
$20 per session, pay instructor at each class
For more information, call 828-350-2058 or email [email protected]

Cricut Kickstart Workshop
Session A: January 10, advance registration at AVLREC.com required by January 3
Session B: April 10, advance registration at AVLREC.com required by April 3
Get your feet wet in the world of all things Cricut as we chat about different machines and their best uses, and tackle the basics of the software, with lots of time for questions. You’ll create your own vinyl design to transfer on to a provided coffee mug.

Valentine’s Day Cards
February 7, advance registration at AVLREC.com required by January 31
Learn how to use your Cricut to make personalized cards. Even if you’re new, you’ll leave with an awesome card in hand.

Easter Banners
March 6, advance registration at AVLREC.com required by February 28
Dive into crafting a cute seasonal banner using the trusty Cricut, twine, and good ol’ clothing pins. We’ll cut out sweet egg shapes and string them up with twine, giving you the perfect excuse to showcase your handmade charm.

Crafting in Progress Sign
May 8, advance registration at AVLREC.com required by May 1
Craft a personalized sign proudly declaring that you’re “Crafting in Progress!” A cute loading bar adds a touch of whimsy as a fun nod to the crafting journey.

Monday, April 15, 2024
The Disney Cruise Raffle
Apr 15 all-day
online w/ Asheville Community Theatre

Here’s your chance! Asheville Community Theatre is thrilled to offer you the opportunity to win a magical 4-day Disney Cruise for four. By purchasing a raffle ticket, not only do you get a shot at an unforgettable family vacation, but you also support the arts in our community.

Prize Details:

  • A Dream Cruise: The winner and three guests will embark on a 4-day journey to the Bahamas aboard a Disney Cruise ship. You’ll stay in a Veranda Cabin with breathtaking views and top-notch amenities.
  • Customized Experience: Work with our travel agent, David Lloyd of Foothills Travel, to tailor your trip to perfection. Whether it’s exciting onboard activities or exploring the ports, your adventure will be exactly what you’ve dreamed of.
  • Travel Support: We’ve got you covered with an additional $500 to help with transportation to and from Port Canaveral, ensuring a smooth start and end to your magical journey.
  • Complete Assistance: From the moment you win to the end of your cruise, you’ll have personalized support to ensure your trip is seamless and unforgettable.
  • Tickets are just $50 each, making this the perfect opportunity to potentially win a trip valued at $8,800, while supporting Asheville Community Theatre’s mission to enrich our community through the arts.

Don’t miss out on this chance to create lasting memories with your loved ones. Get your tickets now!

Click here to view the complete set of rules.

VOICES OF THE RIVER CONTEST
Apr 15 all-day
online

Calling All Young Artists, Poets, and Creative Souls

We invite you to get inspired by the French Broad River and her watershed. Show off your creativity by submitting 2D art, 3D art, and poetry that reflect your connection with nature. Your work serves as a reminder of the beauty of Western NC and the impact it can have on us all.

We are now accepting submissions for our 17th annual Voices of the River Art and Poetry Contest. Children in grades K-12 are invited to submit original creative works that reflect their personal experiences, observations, and/or feelings regarding the river.

Local environmental advocates, artists, and poets will review entries and select three winners from each category and age group. The winners will receive prizes from some generous local businesses. All submissions will be displayed at a special gallery event on May 11 from 10 AM – 1 PM at Black Wall Street AVL.

Volunteer with United Way at the Mosaic Realty Art Walk
Apr 15 all-day
Asheville Art Museum
Before you begin thinking about volunteering, ask yourself – Am I well enough to volunteer?


On Thursday, May 2, from 5-9 p.m., Mosaic Realty will come together with 14 downtown Asheville galleries for the second annual Mosaic Art Walk and Benefit. This free community fundraiser, open to the public, will be hosted by Mosaic Realty, with each gallery highlighting a different local nonprofit.

United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County is seeking volunteers to assist them at their table which will be stationed at the Asheville Art Museum for this event.

Volunteer Responsibilities:

  • Assist with answering questions and guiding participants to where they need to go
  • Hand out flyers on how to become involved in the raffle
  • Help watch over the car that will be raffled off
  • Aid in keeping spaces free of plates and drinks left unattended

Requirements:

  • Volunteers must be 21 years old or older
  • Volunteers will be stationed inside and outside of the museum
  • All volunteers will need to sign a UWABC waiver when they check in

Skills Required: 

  • Positive and compassionate customer service skills
  • Excellent verbal and non-verbal communication skills
  • Ability to remain standing for long periods

Attire:

  • Black pants and a black shirt
  • Comfortable, close-toed shoes

Location:

  • Asheville Art Museum, 2 S Pack Square, Asheville, NC 28801
Nature’s Blueprints: Biomimicry in Art and Design
Apr 15 @ 8:00 am – 7:00 pm
NC Arboretum

Baker Exhibit Center

In an age of complex environmental challenges, why not look to the ingenuity of nature for solutions? The forms, patterns, and processes found in the natural world—refined by 3.8 billion years of evolution—can inspire our design of everything from clothing to skyscrapers. This approach to innovation, called biomimicry, is becoming increasingly popular.

Nature’s Blueprints is supported in part by The North Carolina Arboretum Society, The Laurel of Asheville, RomanticAsheville.com Travel Guide, and Smoky Mountain Living Magazine.

Art Exhibition: Hammer and Hope
Apr 15 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Historians estimate that skilled Black artisans outnumbered their white counterparts in the antebellum South by a margin of five to one. However, despite their presence and prevalence in all corners of the pre-industrial trade and craft fields, the stories of these skilled workers go largely unacknowledged.

Borrowing its title from a Black culture and politics magazine of the same name, Hammer and Hope celebrates the life and labor of Black chairmakers in early America. Featuring the work of two contemporary furniture makers – Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland – the pieces in this exhibition are based on the artists’ research into ladderback chairs created by the Poynors, a multigenerational family of free and enslaved craftspeople working in central Tennessee between the early nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Through the objects featured in Hammer and Hope, Awake and Ryland explore, reinterpret, and reimagine what the field of furniture-making today would look like had the history and legacy of the Poynors – and countless others that have been subject to a similar pattern of erasure – been celebrated rather than hidden. Hammer and Hope represents Awake and Ryland’s attempts, in their own words,  “at fighting erasure by making objects that engage with these long-suppressed stories.”

Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland are recipients of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas
Apr 15 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas features eleven textiles by acclaimed Indigenous artisanas  (artists) from Chiapas, Mexico commissioned by US-based fiber artists and activist Aram Han Sifuentes. As part of their 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship, Han Sifuentes traveled to Chiapas to understand the function of garments and textiles within the social and cultural context of the area and to learn the traditional practice of backstrap weaving. Through the works on view, combined with a series of interviews Han Sifuentes conducted during her research, visitors learn about the artisanas and their role as preservers, rescuers, and innovators of culture and as protectors of Mayan ancestral knowledge. Together, these works present an approach to connecting and learning about culture through craft practices

Han Sifuentes is interested in backstrap weaving because it is one of the oldest forms used across cultures. The vibrant hues and elaborate designs of each textile express the artisanas identities and medium to tell their stories. To understand how these values manifested in textiles made in Chiapas, Han Sifuentes invited the artisanas to create whatever weaving they desired over the course of three months.  This is unique because most textiles in the area are created to meet tourist-driven and marketplace demands. Incorporating traditional backstrap weaving and natural dye techniques, some artisans created textiles to rescue or reintroduce weaving practices that are almost or completely lost in their communities, while others were created through material and conceptual experimentation. This range of approaches reflects how artistanas are constantly innovating while at the same time honoring and keeping to tradition.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas is on view from November 17, 2023 to July 13, 2024.

Aram Han Sifuentes is a recipient of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

The featured artisanas include: Juana Victoria Hernandez Gomez from San Juan Cancuc, Maria Josefina Gómez Sanchez and Maria de Jesus Gómez Sanchez from Oxchujk (Oxchuc), Marcela Gómez Diaz and Cecilia Gómez Diaz from San Andrés Larráinzar, Rosa Margarita Enríquez Bolóm from Huixtán, Cristina García Pérez from Chalchihuitán, Susana Maria Gómez Gonzalez, Maria Gonzalez Guillén, and Anastacia Juana Gómez Gonzalez from Zinacantán, Angelica Leticia Gómez Santiz from Pantelhó, and Susana Guadalupe Méndez Santiz from Aldama

 

American Art in the Atomic Age: 1940-1960
Apr 15 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Images: Left: Minna Wright Citron, Squid Under Pier, 1948, color etching, soft-ground, and engraving on paper, edition 42/50, 15 x 17 7/8 inches, 2010 Collections Circle purchase, Asheville Art Museum. © Estate of Minna Citron/Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York. Right: Dorothy Dehner, Woman #2, 1954, watercolor and ink on paper, 22 3/4 x 18”, courtesy of Dolan Maxwell.

The Asheville Art Museum is pleased to announce the upcoming exhibition American Art in the Atomic Age: 1940–1960, which explores the groundbreaking contributions of artists who worked at the experimental printmaking studio Atelier 17 in the wake of World War II. Co-curated by Marilyn Laufer and Tom Butler, American Art in the Atomic Age which draws from the holdings of Dolan/Maxwell, the Asheville Art Museum Collection, and private collections will be on view from November 10, 2023–April 29, 2024.

Atelier 17 operated in New York for fifteen years, between 1940 and 1955. The studio’s founder, Stanley William Hayter (1901–1988) established the workshop in Paris but relocated to New York just as the Nazi occupation of Paris began in 1940. Hayter’s new studio attracted European emigrants like André Masson, Yves Tanguy, and Joan Miró, as well as American artists like Dorothy Dehner, Judith Rothschild, and Karl Schrag, allowing for an exchange of artistic ideas and processes between European and American artists.

The Asheville Art Museum will present over 100 works that exemplify the cross-cultural exchange and profound social and political impact of Atelier 17 on American art. Prints made at Atelier 17—including those by Stanley William Hayter, Louise Nevelson, and Perle Fine—will be in conversation with works by European Surrealists who were working at the studio in the 1940s and 1950s. The exhibition will also feature a selection of domestic mid-century objects that exemplify how the ideas and aesthetics of post-war abstraction became a part of everyday life.

Honoring Nature: Early Southern Appalachian Landscape Painting
Apr 15 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

In the early 1900s, travel by train and automobile became more accessible in the United States, leading to an increase in tourism and a revitalized interest in landscape painting. The relative ease of transportation, as well as the creation of National Parks, allowed people to experience the breathtaking landscapes of the United States in new ways. Artists traveled along popular routes, recording the terrain they encountered.

This exhibition explores the sublime natural landscapes of the Smokey Mountains of Western North Carolina and Tennessee. While there were several regional schools of painting around this time, this group is largely from the Midwest and many of the artists trained at the Art Institute of Chicago or in New York City. Through their travels, they captured waterfalls, sunsets, thunderstorms, autumn foliage, lush green summers, and snow-covered mountains—elements that were novel for viewers from cities and rural areas. Though some of these paintings include people, they are usually used for scale and painted with little to no detail, highlighting the magnificence of nature.

Rudolph F. Ingerle, Mirrored Mountain, not dated, oil on canvas, 28 × 32 inches. Courtesy of Allen & Barry Huffman, Asheville Art Museum.

The New Salon: A Contemporary View
Apr 15 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum
Bender Gallery Artists

Featured in

Asheville Art Museum Exhibition

The New Salon: A Contemporary View

The Asheville Art Museum will be opening their exhibit, The New Salon: A Contemporary View, on March 8 and it will run until August 19, 2024. The New Salon offers a modern take on the prestigious tradition of the Parisian Salon with the diversity and innovation of today’s art world. Guest-curated by Gabriel Shaffer, the show will include works from Pop Surrealism, Outsider Art, Street Art, and Graffiti genres.

 

Bender Gallery has been collaborating with the Asheville Art Museum to loan four paintings from three of our artists. The artists are Laine Bachman, Kukula, and Yui Sakamoto. Be sure to check out this special exhibition in downtown Asheville.

Learn More

Kukula, Impossible Voyage, oil on board, 48 x 24 inches

Kukula (b. 1980, Israel)

Nataly Abramovitch, better known in the art world as, Kukula, paints imagined worlds filled with elaborately dressed women in fanciful settings. The artist does extensive research on the layouts of paintings from the Renaissance and Rococo periods. Kukula subverts these images by depicting women characters in place of traditionally male positions and settings. Her characters are powerful, commanding, and have an air of indifference.

Available Work

Yui Sakamoto, Self Portrait, oil on canvas, 63 x 63 inches

Yui Sakamoto (b. 1981, Japan)

Our surrealist artist, Yui Sakamoto, will have two paintings featured including My Soul and Self Portrait. Self Portrait is still available from his recent solo exhibition at Bender Gallery. Standing in front of Self Portrait, one is immersed in the dual-worlds of Sakamoto’s Japanese and Mexican cultures. There is a sense of calm reflected in the repeating rose pattern, mixed with the uneasy realization that the coral, fungi, and otherworldly forms are what makeup the figure.

Available Work

Laine Bachman, Night Bloomers, acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24 inches

Laine Bachman (b. 1974, USA)

Our prolific Magical Realism artist, Laine Bachman, makes a feature in the exhibition with her painting, Night Bloomers. She has been hard at work making 17 new pieces for her solo exhibition at the Canton Art Museum in Canton, Ohio. The Canton show opens on April 28 and continues through to July 28, 2024.

Available Work
Vera B. Williams / STORIES Eight Decades of Politics and Picture Making
Apr 15 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

 

Exhibition and Public Programming

Vera B. Williams, an award-winning author and illustrator of children’s books, started making pictures almost as soon as she could walk. She studied at Black Mountain College in a time where summer institutes were held with classes taught by John Cage and Merce Cunningham. Williams studied under the Bauhaus luminary Josef Albers and went on to make art for the rest of her life. At the time of her death, The New York Times wrote: “Her illustrations, known for bold colors and a style reminiscent of folk art, were praised by reviewers for their great tenderness and crackling vitality.” Despite numerous awards and recognition for her children’s books, much of her wider life and work remains unexplored. This retrospective will showcase the complete range of Williams’ life and work. It will highlight her time at Black Mountain College, her political activism, and her establishment, with Paul Williams, of an influential yet little-known artist community, in addition to her work as an author and illustrator.

Author and illustrator of 17 children’s books, including Caldecott medal winner, A Chair for My Mother, Vera B. Williams always had a passion for the arts. Williams grew up in the Bronx, NY, and in 1936, when she was nine years old, one of her paintings, called Yentas, opens a new window, was included in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. While Williams is widely known for her children’s books today, this exhibition’s expansive scope highlights unexplored aspects of her artistic practice and eight decades of life. From groundbreaking, powerful covers for Liberation Magazine, to Peace calendar collaborations with writer activist Grace Paley, to scenic sketches for Julian Beck and Judith Malina’s Living Theater, to hundreds of late life “Aging and Illness” cartoons sketches and doodles, Vera never sat still.

Williams arrived at Black Mountain College in 1945. While there, she embraced all aspects of living, working, and learning in the intensely creative college community. She was at BMC during a particularly fertile period, which allowed her to study with faculty members Buckminster Fuller and Josef Albers, and to participate in the famed summer sessions with John Cage, Merce Cunningham, M.C. Richards, and Robert Rauschenberg. In 1948, she graduated with Josef Albers as her advisor and sculptor Richard Lippold as her outside examiner. Forever one of the College’s shining stars, Vera graduated from BMC with just six semesters of coursework, at only twenty-one years old. She continued to visit BMC for years afterward, staying deeply involved with the artistic community that BMC incubated.

Anticipating the eventual closure of BMC, Williams, alongside her husband Paul Williams and a group of influential former BMC figures, founded The Gate Hill Cooperative Artists community located 30 miles north of NYC on the outskirts of Stony Point, NY. The Gate Hill Cooperative, also known as The Land, became an outcropping of Black Mountain College’s experimental ethos. Students and faculty including John Cage, M.C. Richards, David Tudor, Karen Karnes, David Weinrib, Stan VanDerBeek, and Patsy Lynch Wood shaped Gate Hill as founding members of the community. Vera B. Williams raised her three children at Gate Hill while continuing to make work.

The early Gate Hill era represented an especially creative phase for the BMC group. For Williams, this period saw the creation of 76 covers for Liberation Magazine, a radical, groundbreaking publication. This exhibition will feature some of Williams’ most powerful Liberation covers including a design for the June 1963 edition, which contained the first full publication of MLK’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” Williams’ activism work continued throughout her life. As president of PEN’s Children Committee and member of The War Resisters league, she created a wide range of political and educational posters and journal covers. Williams protested the war in Vietnam and nuclear proliferation while supporting women’s causes and racial equality. In 1981, Williams was arrested and spent a month in a federal prison on charges stemming from her political activism.

In her late 40’s, Williams embarked in earnest on her career as a children’s book author and illustrator, a career which garnered the NY Public Library’s recognition of A Chair for My Mother as one of the greatest 100 children’s books of all time. Infinitely curious and always a wanderer at heart, Williams’ personal life was as expansive as her art. In addition to her prolific picture making, Williams started and helped run a Summerhill-based alternative school, canoed the Yukon, and lived alone on a houseboat in Vancouver Harbor. She helped to organize and attended dozens of political demonstrations throughout her adult life.

Her books won many awards including the Caldecott Medal Honor Book for A Chair for My Mother in 1983, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award– Fiction category– for Scooter in 1994, the Jane Addams Honor for Amber Was Brave, Essie Was Smart in 2002, and the NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature in 2009. Her books reflected her values, emphasizing love, compassion, kindness, joy, strength, individuality, and courage.

Images:

Cover of Vera B. Williams’ A Chair for My Mother, published in 1982.

Vera B. Williams, Cover for Liberation Magazine, November 1958.

Western North Carolina Glass: Selections from the Collection
Apr 15 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Western North Carolina is important in the history of American glass art. Several artists of the Studio Glass Movement came to the region, including its founder Harvey K. Littleton. Begun in 1962 in Wisconsin, it was a student of Littleton’s that first came to the area in 1965 and set up a glass studio at the Penland School of Craft in Penland, North Carolina. By 1967, Mark Peiser was the first glass artist resident at the school and taught many notable artists, like Jak Brewer in 1968 and Richard Ritter who came to study in 1971. By 1977, Littleton retired from teaching and moved to nearby Spruce Pine, North Carolina and set up a glass studio at his home.

Since that time, glass artists like Ken Carder, Rick and Valerie Beck, Shane Fero, and Yaffa Sikorsky and Jeff Todd—to name only a few—have flocked to the area to reside, collaborate, and teach, making it a significant place for experimentation and education in glass. The next generation of artists like Hayden Wilson and Alex Bernstein continue to create here. The Museum is dedicated to collecting American studio glass and within that umbrella, explores the work of Artists connected to Western North Carolina. Exhibitions, including Intersections of American Art, explore glass art in the context of American Art of the 20th and 21st centuries. A variety of techniques and a willingness to push boundaries of the medium can be seen in this selection of works from the Museum’s Collection.

Weaverville Elementary School – Spring Musical Finding Nemo Kids
Apr 15 @ 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm
Weaverville Elementary School

Spring Musical

Finding Nemo KIDS

2nd-4th Grades

Mondays

2:30pm-4:00pm

2/5, 2/12, 2/19, 2/26, 3/4, 3/11, 3/18, 3/25, 4/8, 4/15, 4/22, 4/29

*No Class 4/1/2024

Dress Rehearsal: 4/22 2:30-4:00pm

Performance: 4/29/2024 3:30pm

Tuition: $270

Students will learn all about teamwork as they work together with their classmates and a professional Teaching Artist to perform scenes and songs from a short musical. Each actor will receive their own part with lines and songs to learn. Class time will be used for rehearsal and a performance complete with costumes and props will take place on the final class day.

In Person at Weaverville Elementary School

129 S Main St, Weaverville, NC 28787

 

Monday Night Dance: Community contra dance
Apr 15 @ 8:15 pm – 10:30 pm
St. George's Center for Art and Spirit

Welcome to our weekly community contra dance in West Asheville!  The Monday Night Dance has been around for decades, and we are carrying the torch forward! We are a loving, kind, and safe dance community and highly encourage masking during the dance. No derogatory comments in relation to masking will be tolerated! We encourage non-maskers to mask while partnering with a dancer wearing a mask, or to at least ask if the person would like them to mask while they dance with them.

Practicalities

Time: Contra dancing 8:15–10:30pm, with a beginner lesson starting at 7:45 and a waltz session ending the evening.

Location: St. George’s Center for Art and Spirit, 1 School Rd., Asheville, NC 28806

Cost: $12–$45 sliding scale, CASH ONLY. Please pay as much as you can afford to cover the cost of the wonderful live music, the caller, sound person, rent, and other expenses! ATMs are available at banks on Patton Ave., as well as cash back options at local gas stations and grocery stores.

Requirements: Face masks and sign-in agreeing to the dance’s Safety Guidelines.

Please enter through the front red doors to the sanctuary. Extra parking available in the lots between Moore’s Foot and Ankle and St. George’s (please avoid parking in front of their practice.) This is a scent-free dance. Please bring your own water and water bottle. Beginners are encouraged to attend! Beginner-friendly dances start the contra dancing in lieu of a lesson.

Community Focus

The Monday Night Dance is more than just a dance; the community is deeply rooted. Folks are welcome to sell their wares, like jewelry, dance shoes, dance clothes, pottery, etc. They are also welcome to leave business cards and help wanted or work needed ads. Additionally, the Take Some Leave Some Closet is a new feature of the MND. You can take any clothes, food, produce, feminine products or first aid supplies that we have, and as you are able you can also leave some to replenish. Private times to receive from the closet can also be arranged during the week depending on to the dance organizer’s availability.

Safety

We emphasize safety here at the MND. Mask wearing is strongly encouraged, and courtesy to those choosing to mask is required. No discrimination to those wearing masks will be tolerated! In addition, this is a family and LGBTQ-friendly dance and a safe event for ALL races, ethnicities, genders, ages, shapes, and sizes. Accordingly, no discrimination, inappropriate sexually predatory behavior, racist or discriminatory comments, bullying, or verbal or physical abuse of ANY kind will be tolerated. See our Safety Guidelines for more info.

Volunteers and Donations

Ours is a dance built on volunteerism, and we need your help to survive! Please consider volunteering or becoming a patron by giving a monetary gift. Opening, door and closing help are some of the volunteer jobs available. Those completing their entire shift dance free! Email [email protected] for more info and to sign up. 

Finally, please follow, like and join us on Facebook!

Thanks so much and see you on the dance floor!

Tuesday, April 16, 2024
Asheville Performing Arts Academy Summer Musical Theatre Camps: Registration Open
Apr 16 all-day
Asheville Performing Arts Academy

We’re offering TWO grade levels this summer for our workshops:

  • Younger Ages (Rising 1st – 3rd Grade)
  • Older Ages (Rising 4th – 10th Grade)

Camps run Monday-Friday, 9am-3pm

Finding Nemo Workshop

June 17-21, 2024

July 8-12, 2024

July 29- Aug 2, 2024

Moana Workshop

June 24-28, 2024

July 15-19, 2024

August 5-9, 2024

Pirate Palooza Workshop

July 1-5, 2024

The Little Mermaid Workshop

July 22-26, 2024

Our Musical Theatre Workshop camps center around favorite stage musicals, where students will learn musical numbers and perform a shortened production at the end of each week. Campers will not only perform in many dance numbers and scenes but will work on the technical aspects that all productions need, like sets, props, and costumes.

The Disney Cruise Raffle
Apr 16 all-day
online w/ Asheville Community Theatre

Here’s your chance! Asheville Community Theatre is thrilled to offer you the opportunity to win a magical 4-day Disney Cruise for four. By purchasing a raffle ticket, not only do you get a shot at an unforgettable family vacation, but you also support the arts in our community.

Prize Details:

  • A Dream Cruise: The winner and three guests will embark on a 4-day journey to the Bahamas aboard a Disney Cruise ship. You’ll stay in a Veranda Cabin with breathtaking views and top-notch amenities.
  • Customized Experience: Work with our travel agent, David Lloyd of Foothills Travel, to tailor your trip to perfection. Whether it’s exciting onboard activities or exploring the ports, your adventure will be exactly what you’ve dreamed of.
  • Travel Support: We’ve got you covered with an additional $500 to help with transportation to and from Port Canaveral, ensuring a smooth start and end to your magical journey.
  • Complete Assistance: From the moment you win to the end of your cruise, you’ll have personalized support to ensure your trip is seamless and unforgettable.
  • Tickets are just $50 each, making this the perfect opportunity to potentially win a trip valued at $8,800, while supporting Asheville Community Theatre’s mission to enrich our community through the arts.

Don’t miss out on this chance to create lasting memories with your loved ones. Get your tickets now!

Click here to view the complete set of rules.

VOICES OF THE RIVER CONTEST
Apr 16 all-day
online

Calling All Young Artists, Poets, and Creative Souls

We invite you to get inspired by the French Broad River and her watershed. Show off your creativity by submitting 2D art, 3D art, and poetry that reflect your connection with nature. Your work serves as a reminder of the beauty of Western NC and the impact it can have on us all.

We are now accepting submissions for our 17th annual Voices of the River Art and Poetry Contest. Children in grades K-12 are invited to submit original creative works that reflect their personal experiences, observations, and/or feelings regarding the river.

Local environmental advocates, artists, and poets will review entries and select three winners from each category and age group. The winners will receive prizes from some generous local businesses. All submissions will be displayed at a special gallery event on May 11 from 10 AM – 1 PM at Black Wall Street AVL.

Nature’s Blueprints: Biomimicry in Art and Design
Apr 16 @ 8:00 am – 7:00 pm
NC Arboretum

Baker Exhibit Center

In an age of complex environmental challenges, why not look to the ingenuity of nature for solutions? The forms, patterns, and processes found in the natural world—refined by 3.8 billion years of evolution—can inspire our design of everything from clothing to skyscrapers. This approach to innovation, called biomimicry, is becoming increasingly popular.

Nature’s Blueprints is supported in part by The North Carolina Arboretum Society, The Laurel of Asheville, RomanticAsheville.com Travel Guide, and Smoky Mountain Living Magazine.

Art Exhibition: Hammer and Hope
Apr 16 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Historians estimate that skilled Black artisans outnumbered their white counterparts in the antebellum South by a margin of five to one. However, despite their presence and prevalence in all corners of the pre-industrial trade and craft fields, the stories of these skilled workers go largely unacknowledged.

Borrowing its title from a Black culture and politics magazine of the same name, Hammer and Hope celebrates the life and labor of Black chairmakers in early America. Featuring the work of two contemporary furniture makers – Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland – the pieces in this exhibition are based on the artists’ research into ladderback chairs created by the Poynors, a multigenerational family of free and enslaved craftspeople working in central Tennessee between the early nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Through the objects featured in Hammer and Hope, Awake and Ryland explore, reinterpret, and reimagine what the field of furniture-making today would look like had the history and legacy of the Poynors – and countless others that have been subject to a similar pattern of erasure – been celebrated rather than hidden. Hammer and Hope represents Awake and Ryland’s attempts, in their own words,  “at fighting erasure by making objects that engage with these long-suppressed stories.”

Robell Awake and Charlie Ryland are recipients of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas
Apr 16 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Center for Craft

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas features eleven textiles by acclaimed Indigenous artisanas  (artists) from Chiapas, Mexico commissioned by US-based fiber artists and activist Aram Han Sifuentes. As part of their 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship, Han Sifuentes traveled to Chiapas to understand the function of garments and textiles within the social and cultural context of the area and to learn the traditional practice of backstrap weaving. Through the works on view, combined with a series of interviews Han Sifuentes conducted during her research, visitors learn about the artisanas and their role as preservers, rescuers, and innovators of culture and as protectors of Mayan ancestral knowledge. Together, these works present an approach to connecting and learning about culture through craft practices

Han Sifuentes is interested in backstrap weaving because it is one of the oldest forms used across cultures. The vibrant hues and elaborate designs of each textile express the artisanas identities and medium to tell their stories. To understand how these values manifested in textiles made in Chiapas, Han Sifuentes invited the artisanas to create whatever weaving they desired over the course of three months.  This is unique because most textiles in the area are created to meet tourist-driven and marketplace demands. Incorporating traditional backstrap weaving and natural dye techniques, some artisans created textiles to rescue or reintroduce weaving practices that are almost or completely lost in their communities, while others were created through material and conceptual experimentation. This range of approaches reflects how artistanas are constantly innovating while at the same time honoring and keeping to tradition.

Preservers, Innovators, and Rescuers of Culture in Chiapas is on view from November 17, 2023 to July 13, 2024.

Aram Han Sifuentes is a recipient of the Center for Craft’s 2022 Craft Research Fund Artist Fellowship. This substantial mid-career grant is awarded to two artists to support research projects that advance, expand, and support the creation of new research and knowledge through craft practice.

The featured artisanas include: Juana Victoria Hernandez Gomez from San Juan Cancuc, Maria Josefina Gómez Sanchez and Maria de Jesus Gómez Sanchez from Oxchujk (Oxchuc), Marcela Gómez Diaz and Cecilia Gómez Diaz from San Andrés Larráinzar, Rosa Margarita Enríquez Bolóm from Huixtán, Cristina García Pérez from Chalchihuitán, Susana Maria Gómez Gonzalez, Maria Gonzalez Guillén, and Anastacia Juana Gómez Gonzalez from Zinacantán, Angelica Leticia Gómez Santiz from Pantelhó, and Susana Guadalupe Méndez Santiz from Aldama

 

Joseph Fiore: Black Mountain College Paintings
Apr 16 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

 11am – 5pm Tuesday through Saturday

Born in Cleveland, Ohio, Joseph Fiore (1925-2008) first enrolled at Black Mountain College for the Summer Session of 1946, the summer that Josef Albers invited Jacob Lawrence to teach painting at BMC. Over the next three years, Fiore also studied with Ilya Bolotowsky, Willem de Kooning, and Jean Varda. In 1949, after Josef and Anni Albers’ departure, Joe was invited to join the faculty, and he taught painting and drawing until 1956 when the college leaders decided to close.

After BMC closed, Joe and his wife Mary, whom he met and married at BMC, moved to New York City. There he became involved with the 10th Street art scene of the late 1950s and 1960s, a group of galleries that exhibited the work of young artists on the rise. Eventually he resumed his teaching career at the Philadelphia College of Art, Maryland Institute College of Art, and the National Academy.

In May of 2001, Joseph Fiore was awarded the Andrew Carnegie Prize at the National Academy of Design in New York. The Carnegie Prize is awarded “for painting” at the National Academy’s Members’ Show.

This exhibition consists of paintings in our collection donated by the artist and by The Falcon Foundation. All of the paintings were made at Black Mountain College and show Fiore’s distinctive use of color and his ability to work comfortably in the spaces between abstraction and representation.

Curated by Alice Sebrell, Director of Preservation

Vera B. Williams / STORIES Eight Decades of Politics and Picture Making
Apr 16 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center

 

Exhibition and Public Programming

Vera B. Williams, an award-winning author and illustrator of children’s books, started making pictures almost as soon as she could walk. She studied at Black Mountain College in a time where summer institutes were held with classes taught by John Cage and Merce Cunningham. Williams studied under the Bauhaus luminary Josef Albers and went on to make art for the rest of her life. At the time of her death, The New York Times wrote: “Her illustrations, known for bold colors and a style reminiscent of folk art, were praised by reviewers for their great tenderness and crackling vitality.” Despite numerous awards and recognition for her children’s books, much of her wider life and work remains unexplored. This retrospective will showcase the complete range of Williams’ life and work. It will highlight her time at Black Mountain College, her political activism, and her establishment, with Paul Williams, of an influential yet little-known artist community, in addition to her work as an author and illustrator.

Author and illustrator of 17 children’s books, including Caldecott medal winner, A Chair for My Mother, Vera B. Williams always had a passion for the arts. Williams grew up in the Bronx, NY, and in 1936, when she was nine years old, one of her paintings, called Yentas, opens a new window, was included in an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. While Williams is widely known for her children’s books today, this exhibition’s expansive scope highlights unexplored aspects of her artistic practice and eight decades of life. From groundbreaking, powerful covers for Liberation Magazine, to Peace calendar collaborations with writer activist Grace Paley, to scenic sketches for Julian Beck and Judith Malina’s Living Theater, to hundreds of late life “Aging and Illness” cartoons sketches and doodles, Vera never sat still.

Williams arrived at Black Mountain College in 1945. While there, she embraced all aspects of living, working, and learning in the intensely creative college community. She was at BMC during a particularly fertile period, which allowed her to study with faculty members Buckminster Fuller and Josef Albers, and to participate in the famed summer sessions with John Cage, Merce Cunningham, M.C. Richards, and Robert Rauschenberg. In 1948, she graduated with Josef Albers as her advisor and sculptor Richard Lippold as her outside examiner. Forever one of the College’s shining stars, Vera graduated from BMC with just six semesters of coursework, at only twenty-one years old. She continued to visit BMC for years afterward, staying deeply involved with the artistic community that BMC incubated.

Anticipating the eventual closure of BMC, Williams, alongside her husband Paul Williams and a group of influential former BMC figures, founded The Gate Hill Cooperative Artists community located 30 miles north of NYC on the outskirts of Stony Point, NY. The Gate Hill Cooperative, also known as The Land, became an outcropping of Black Mountain College’s experimental ethos. Students and faculty including John Cage, M.C. Richards, David Tudor, Karen Karnes, David Weinrib, Stan VanDerBeek, and Patsy Lynch Wood shaped Gate Hill as founding members of the community. Vera B. Williams raised her three children at Gate Hill while continuing to make work.

The early Gate Hill era represented an especially creative phase for the BMC group. For Williams, this period saw the creation of 76 covers for Liberation Magazine, a radical, groundbreaking publication. This exhibition will feature some of Williams’ most powerful Liberation covers including a design for the June 1963 edition, which contained the first full publication of MLK’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” Williams’ activism work continued throughout her life. As president of PEN’s Children Committee and member of The War Resisters league, she created a wide range of political and educational posters and journal covers. Williams protested the war in Vietnam and nuclear proliferation while supporting women’s causes and racial equality. In 1981, Williams was arrested and spent a month in a federal prison on charges stemming from her political activism.

In her late 40’s, Williams embarked in earnest on her career as a children’s book author and illustrator, a career which garnered the NY Public Library’s recognition of A Chair for My Mother as one of the greatest 100 children’s books of all time. Infinitely curious and always a wanderer at heart, Williams’ personal life was as expansive as her art. In addition to her prolific picture making, Williams started and helped run a Summerhill-based alternative school, canoed the Yukon, and lived alone on a houseboat in Vancouver Harbor. She helped to organize and attended dozens of political demonstrations throughout her adult life.

Her books won many awards including the Caldecott Medal Honor Book for A Chair for My Mother in 1983, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award– Fiction category– for Scooter in 1994, the Jane Addams Honor for Amber Was Brave, Essie Was Smart in 2002, and the NSK Neustadt Prize for Children’s Literature in 2009. Her books reflected her values, emphasizing love, compassion, kindness, joy, strength, individuality, and courage.

Images:

Cover of Vera B. Williams’ A Chair for My Mother, published in 1982.

Vera B. Williams, Cover for Liberation Magazine, November 1958.