Upcoming events and things to do in Asheville, NC. Below is a list of events for festivals, concerts, art exhibitions, group meetups and more.

Friday, February 3, 2023
2023 Food Vendor Application for ADA Events Now Available
Feb 3 all-day
online

The application to be a food vendor at our events is now available. We’re seeking vendors for Downtown After 5, the Independence Day Celebration and Asheville Oktoberfest.

Click here to fill out the application. Application deadline is Friday, February 10.

Affordable Parking Program: Application Window extened
Feb 3 all-day
online

 

Do you work in downtown Asheville? If so, Buncombe County’s new affordable parking program could save you hundreds of your hard-earned dollars. The program will offer 150 spots at the Coxe Ave. parking deck (located at 11 Sears Alley) for $40 per month. This new initiative, focused on service industry and retail workers, is now taking applications for people who meet some basic eligibility requirements.

The application window will remain open for three weeks and closes on Friday, Jan. 13. After applying, a lottery system will determine who gets the 150 reduced-cost parking spots. Everyone else will be put on a waitlist with a chance to get spots based on attrition.

Eligibility requirements

  • You must work in the downtown Asheville area (within one mile of Pack Square)
  • You must earn less than 80% area median income (see application for income limits)
  • Have a valid driver license
  • Have a credit card or bank account to link for payment
  • Applicants must be age 18 or older

If you think you meet the following requirements, please fill out an application here. The deadline to apply for the lottery is Friday, Jan. 13. If you are not able to submit an application online or need assistance completing the application, call (828) 250-5060.

Apply here

Fine print

This is a pilot program and it might be expanded in the future as the County evaluates data from this initial offering. Buncombe County is administering the application and lottery process. Preferred Parking (the County’s parking vendor) will be responsible for selling the tickets and contacting those on the waitlist.


 

Asheville Outlets to Host Food Is Love Food Donation Drive for MANNA FoodBank
Feb 3 all-day
Asheville Outlets

Asheville Outlets will again team with MANNA FoodBank to hold a Food is Love Food Donation Drive during the month of February 2023. The drive will focus on collecting healthy, nonperishable foods for distribution to those in need in western North Carolina. Items of need include low-sodium canned vegetables, canned tuna and chicken, low salt nuts, no sugar added fruits, shelf stable milk, whole grain pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, canola & olive oil, peanut butter, low sodium soups, canned and dried beans, and low sugar cereals Collection bins will be in the Asheville Outlets food court. Monetary donations can be made at MANNAFoodBank.org. For more information, visit ShopAshevilleOutlets.com.

Celebrate Black Legacy Month
Feb 3 all-day
Buncombe County Libraires

Join us throughout February as we celebrate Black Legacy Month with programs and events for all ages! In addition to the programs listed below, we will have special story times and exhibits at most of our libraries.

  • Bright Star Touring Theatre: African Folktales – February 1 at 4pm at the Weaverville Library (for children ages 3 and up)
  • Book Club: Jazz by Toni Morrison – Thursday, February 2 a 3pm at the Weaverville Library
  • Book Club: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett – Tuesday, February 7 at 6pm
  • Book Club: The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict Tuesday, February 14 at 1pm at the Leicester Library
  • Book Club: Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland – February 16 at 2:30pm at the Skyland/South Buncombe Library
  • Book Club: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett – February 21 at 7pm at the Fairview Library
  • Black Experience Book Club: The Furrows by Namwali Serpell – February 23 at 6:30pm at the Noir Collective, co-sponsored by the East Asheville library

Drop by your local library and check us out. Email or call if you have any questions.

Our librarians have also put together a Black Legacy Month reading list for all ages.

Black Legacy Month Reading List 2023

Books for Adults

Adult Fiction

  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
  • On Girlhood: 15 Stories from the Well-Read Black Girl Library edited by Glory Edim
  • What the Fireflies Knew by Kai Harries
  • Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James
  • The Love Songs of W.E.B. Dubois by Honoree Fannone Jeffers
  • How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? by N.K. Jemison
  • Deacon King Kong by James McBride
  • Take My Hand by Dolen Perkins-Valdez
  • Black Bottom Saints by Alice Randall
  • The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb
  • Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead
  • Seven Days in June by Tia Williams
  • Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson

Adult nonfiction

  • Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho
  • Carefree Black Girls: A Celebration of Black women in Popular Culture by Zeba Blay
  • The 1619 Project edited by Nikole Hannah-Jones
  • Rest is Resistance by Tricia Hersey
  • Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby*
  • The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee
  • All That She Carried by Tiya Miles
  • Please Don’t Sit On My Bed In Your Outside Clothes by Phoebe Robinson*
  • You’ll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey by Amber Ruffin*
  • Counting Descent by Clint Smith
  • The Body Is Not an Apology by Sonya Renee Taylor
  • Here For It by R. Eric Thomas*
  • Koshersoul: the faith and food journey of an African American Jew by Michael W. Twitty

*especially good on audio because the authors read their work!

Picture books for families to share

  • My Heart Flies Open by Omileye Achikeobi-Lewis
  • Only the Best: The Exceptional Life and Fashion of Ann Lowe by Kate Messner
  • My N.C. From A to Z by Michelle Lanier
  • Shhh! The Baby’s Asleep by JaNay Brown-Wood
  • Curls by Ruth Forman
  • Fly by Brittany J. Thurman
  • Opal Lee and What it Means to be Free: The True Story of the Grandmother of Juneteenth by Alice Faye Duncan
  • Build a House by Rhiannon Giddens
  • Bright Brown Baby, A Treasury by Andrea Davis Pinkney
  • Born on the Water by Nikole Hannah-Jones and Renee Watson

Chapter books for older kids

  • Isaiah Dunn is My Hero by Kelly J. BaptistBlended by Sharon Draper
  • Ikenga by Nnedi Okorafor
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi
  • Tristan Strong Trilogy (Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky, Tristan Strong Destroys the World, and Tristan Strong Keeps Punching) by Kwame Mbalia
  • From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks
  • Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood edited by Kwame Mbalia
  • Freewater by Amina Luqman-Dawson
  • Operation Sisterhood by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich
  • The Door of No Return by Alexander Kwame

Books for teens

  • Quincredible by Rodney Barnes
  • The Legendborn Cycle (Legendborn and Bloodmarked) by Tracy Deonn
  • All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson
  • You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson
  • Survive the Dome by Kosoko Jackson
  • Revolution in Our Time: The Black Panther’s Promise to the People by Kekla Magoon
  • Ain’t Burned All the Bright by Jason Reynolds
  • Bitter by Akwaeke Emezi
  • On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
  • Okoye to the People by Ibi Zoboi
Financial Assistance is Available for Septic Repairs
Feb 3 all-day
online

If you’ve been struggling to complete a septic system repair at your home, Buncombe County may be able to help provide grant funding. The Septic Repair Assistance Program (SRP) launched in November of 2022, and Permits & Inspections is still accepting applications through Wednesday, Feb. 15 to determine if homeowners may qualify. The SRP provides financial assistance to repair failing septic systems of qualifying homeowners who do not meet the income limit of 80% of Buncombe County Area Median Income($64,250 for a family of four). There is limited time to apply, and if you think you may qualify, please call 250-5360.

To apply for financial assistance, you must:

  1. Be a resident of Buncombe County and own and occupy your home.
  2. Obtain a septic system repair permit from Buncombe County Environmental Health. To request a repair permit, you must submit an application to Environmental Health. Once the application is received, an Environmental Health Specialist will make a site visit and evaluate the existing system, determine repair options, and issue a repair permit.
  3. Obtain bids from at least three septic system contractors. Once the repair permit has been issued, you are responsible for obtaining bids from at least three contractors. A bid is an estimate of how much the repair will cost. We recommend that you request bids from more than three contractors to ensure that you receive at least three of the bids in a timely manner.
  4. Complete a Grant Application form. This form requests specific information needed to determine grant eligibility, including verification of income.
  5. Submit the Grant Application and copies of three contractor bids to Buncombe County Permits & Inspections, 30 Valley St., Asheville, NC 28801 or [email protected]

For more information, please see the attached documents. Applications will be accepted through Feb. 15, 2023. Funding is limited.

Get Your Go Local Card
Feb 3 all-day
online

The Go Local Card celebrates the interdependence of our businesses to each other, public education and to the youth in our community.

Our community values equitable educational opportunities for everyone and the Go Local Card is an annual fundraiser for Asheville’s city public schools.

Since inception, we have raised nearly $220,000 for our schools. This program connects 4,000 children and their families to a healthy local economy and locally owned businesses that support their school.

… and cards are available for purchase at any one of these businesses through Aug. 2023

Griffin Award Nominations Open
Feb 3 all-day
online
Each year, PSABC presents awards to outstanding projects and individuals that further our goals of historic preservation in Asheville and Buncombe County.  Nominations for the 2022 Griffin Awards are open until  March 17th for individuals, companies and organizations in the following categories:
  • Restoration
  • Rehabilitation
  • Adaptive Re-use
  • In-fill Construction in Historic and Traditional Neighborhoods
  • Research, Publication and Education
  • Stewardship
  • Preservation
Sliding Scale Pricing for Spring Conference 2023
Feb 3 all-day
online

Screen Shot 2023-01-19 at 2.09.44 PM

For the past 30 years, the Organic Growers School Spring Conference has served as a gathering place for growers in Appalachia to connect, learn from one another, and deepen connections to land and community. The Spring Conference began as an entirely volunteer-run and free event and has expanded to support an organization of ten staff with year-round programming. As we have grown, we have experimented with different approaches to keeping the event affordable and accessible while also working on compensation for our speakers and supporting our growing staff. We encourage you to check out our recent blog post exploring this in more depth. This year, we are excited to be experimenting with sliding scale ticket pricing for the first time, and we wanted to take some time to explain how this works and why we decided to implement it this year.

Looking beyond scholarships

Over the past several years, we have started implementing different scholarship options. We have set aside around $3000 in our internal budget for scholarships, and we have increased our outreach to other groups in the area who have funding to support individuals to attend conferences. We also offer work-trade opportunities for people who are interested in helping out with our event in exchange for attendance. We have around 100 work-traders access the conference each year through these opportunities, but we have never used up our entire scholarship fund for the event. We know that there are many individuals in our community that we are not reaching through our scholarship opportunities. We began to wonder if scholarship applications were creating a barrier to participation and started researching other options, landing eventually on sliding scale as our preferred model.

How alternative pricing models address accessibility

The sliding scale model, which offers the opportunity for participants to select a price to pay for their ticket, meets several of the parameters we were looking for in an accessible pricing model. Most importantly, it is a seamless way for attendees to access the price that meets their needs. So many things are means-tested in our society, and it can be exhausting to justify why one needs a more affordable price point. While many of our community members need financial support, there are also members of this community who have more than enough to share and are excited about supporting their fellow co-learners. These attendees can select the higher end of the sliding scale, which will be set at a price to offset the lower price paid by other attendees. We trust our attendees to select the option that best works for them while also considering how their selection would affect the ability of other participants to access a lower price point.

Accessibility is a priority for OGS, and implementing it is a risk for us as a small non-profit, given that we rely on our large events like the Spring Conference to support our year-round programming and staff salaries. This will certainly be an experimental year, and if we are not able to secure enough income through sliding-scale registrations, we will have to rethink our approach to pricing. We trust that our community will be thoughtful in thinking about the value that this conference has to them and about what they are able to pay for at this time. Thank you for being on this journey of discovery with us!

 

VOTE in the first annual UScellular Black History Month Art Competition
Feb 3 all-day
online

Members of Boys & Girls Club of Henderson County created original pieces of artwork and the finalists drawings that you will find attached were chosen by Club staff.  The finalists’ artwork will be digitally displayed at UScellular’s Hendersonville location at 1900 Hendersonville Blvd.

The winners will be announced in March and prizes include gift cards in the following amounts:

  • $250 for 1st Place
  • $150 for 2nd Place
  • $100 for 3rd Place

The public can vote for their favorite artwork by going to newsroom.uscellular.com

Work out for free at Linwood Crump Shiloh Community Center
Feb 3 all-day
Linwood Crump Shiloh Community Center

Asheville Parks & Recreation (APR) recently renovated fitness centers at Linwood Crump Shiloh and Stephens-Lee community centers – and community members can enjoy use of cardio equipment, exercise machines, free weights, open gym time, and more through June 30, 2023. During this time, APR will waive membership and daily pass fees so more people can access the necessities for a regular fitness routine. Locals can sign up online or at either community center to receive a fitness center key fob that can be scanned at either location.

 

“Our team is committed to creating spaces in which everyone feels welcome,” according to D. Tyrell McGirt, APR Director. “We are in the community building business. The gyms and fitness rooms at these two locations are filled with everything you’d expect from other top-notch fitness facilities and dedicated to body positivity and accessible wellness. By waiving the cost to use them for the first six months of the year, we hope more friends and neighbors will be able to connect with each other and maintain healthy lifestyles.”

Work out for free at Stephens-Lee Community Center
Feb 3 all-day
Stephens-Lee Community Center

Asheville Parks & Recreation (APR) recently renovated fitness centers at Linwood Crump Shiloh and Stephens-Lee community centers – and community members can enjoy use of cardio equipment, exercise machines, free weights, open gym time, and more through June 30, 2023. During this time, APR will waive membership and daily pass fees so more people can access the necessities for a regular fitness routine. Locals can sign up online or at either community center to receive a fitness center key fob that can be scanned at either location.

 

“Our team is committed to creating spaces in which everyone feels welcome,” according to D. Tyrell McGirt, APR Director. “We are in the community building business. The gyms and fitness rooms at these two locations are filled with everything you’d expect from other top-notch fitness facilities and dedicated to body positivity and accessible wellness. By waiving the cost to use them for the first six months of the year, we hope more friends and neighbors will be able to connect with each other and maintain healthy lifestyles.”

Applications for CDBG, HOME and Housing Trust Fund
Feb 3 @ 6:00 am – 10:00 am
online

The City of Asheville’s Community and Economic Development Department is now accepting applications for CDBG and HOME grant funds, and for the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) for fiscal year 2023-24.

The Community and Economic Development Department manages and administers programs for Asheville and for a four-county consortium, consisting of Buncombe, Henderson, Transylvania and Madison Counties, that provide affordable housing, economic opportunities and other benefits for low-income residents.

The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and the HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) are federal grant programs through the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) which provide grant funds for eligible projects to create affordable housing for low-income households and support community development activities to build stronger and more resilient communities.

The City of Asheville’s Housing Trust Fund was created in 2000 to provide a source of local funding to assist in the development of affordable housing in Asheville. Assistance is available in the form of repayable loans at a low rate of interest.

 

How to Apply:

To download the CDBG/HOME application documents and instructions visit the Community Development Funding Programs page. The deadline to submit an online application for CDBG/HOME funds is February 3, 2023 at 12:00 noon.

To download the Housing Trust Fund documents, view the HTF policy and access the application,  visit the Housing Trust Fund webpage. The deadline to submit an application for the Housing Trust Fund is February 10, 2023 at 12:00 noon.

Questions about the CDBG/HOME application process can be sent to the Community Development team via email: [email protected]

Food Scraps Drop Off: Buncombe County Landfill
Feb 3 @ 8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Buncombe County Landfill – Convenience Center

Food Scraps Drop Off

The City of Asheville, in partnership with Buncombe County and the Natural Resources Defense Council, is offering a FREE Food Scrap Drop-Off program in two locations for all Buncombe County residents.  This organic matter will be collected and turned into good clean compost, keeping it OUT of our landfill and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Register for Food Scraps Drop Off

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Need a handy kitchen countertop food scrap bin?  Let us know on the registration form! We’ll be having bin giveaways at city and county facilities and would love to give you one.

 

Locations Holidays call for hours

Buncombe County Landfill – Convenience Center

85 Panther Branch Road, Alexander

    • Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    • Saturday, 8 a.m. – 12:30 pm

Murphy Oakley Community Center and Library – “Food Scrap Bin Shelters” on the east side of the parking lot

749 Fairview Road, Asheville

    • Dawn – Dusk

Stephens-Lee Recreation Center “Food Scrap Shed” next to the Community Garden on the North side of the parking lot

30 Washington Carver Avenue, Asheville

    • Monday – Friday, 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.
    • Saturday, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    • Sunday, 12 – 4 p.m.

West Asheville Library – “Food Scrap Bin Shelters” on the south side of the building

942 Haywood Road, Asheville

    • Library open hours
Asheville Parks + Rec. 2023 Winter-Spring program guide
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am
online

The beginning of the year is a great time for Ashevillians of all ages to explore, connect, and discover. Asheville Parks & Recreation  (APR)’s new winter-spring program guide is filled with registration dates, information, and listings for hundreds of fitness and active living offerings, sports and clubs, arts and culture programs, out-of-school time activities, outdoor recreation, special events, parks and facilities’ hours of operation, and more.

 

The free guide is available at all APR community centers and online as a PDF or enhanced digital flipbook. Community members may also download the APR app for iPhone or search programs on avlREC.com.

Winter-Spring 2023 Guide Highlights

  • Exercise at fitness centers with a free membership (through June 30, 2023).

  • Walk, roll, or run your way to 50 miles in February and March during the Fit 50 Challenge for a free T-shirt.

  • Celebrate Black Legacy Month with food, art, and festivals throughout the city in February.

  • Meet neighbors over cards, board games, bingo, trivia contests, and community meals.

  • Get an up-close look at big trucks, small trucks, transit buses, construction rigs, rescue vehicles, and public works equipment during Truck City AVL on April 15.

  • Experience the fun, fellowship, fitness, arts, and competition of Asheville-Buncombe Senior Games and Silver Arts Classic for local adults over 50..

  • Flex creativity at art, painting, writing, scrapbooking, and crafting classes.

  • Connect with neighbors over sports such as basketball, flag football, volleyball, pickleball, tennis, and archery for kids, teens, and adults.

  • Enjoy the honor of dirty hands with community garden workdays and Green Thumbs Garden Club at Grove Street Community Center’s greenhouse.

  • Witness the power of gravity at the Montford Pinewood Derby in May.

  • Refine square, tap, line, and West African dance skills at multiple locations.

  • And so much more!

Food Scraps Drop Off: West Asheville Library
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
West Asheville Library

Food Scraps Drop Off

The City of Asheville, in partnership with Buncombe County and the Natural Resources Defense Council, is offering a FREE Food Scrap Drop-Off program in

two locations for all Buncombe County residents.  This organic matter will be collected and turned into good clean compost, keeping it OUT of our landfill and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Register for Food Scraps Drop Off

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Need a handy kitchen countertop food scrap bin?  Let us know on the registration form! We’ll be having bin giveaways at city and county facilities and would love to give you one.

 

Locations

West Asheville Library – “Food Scrap Bin Shelters” on the south side of the building

942 Haywood Road, Asheville

Library open hours

Stephens-Lee Recreation Center “Food Scrap Shed” next to the Community Garden on the North side of the parking lot

30 Washington Carver Avenue, Asheville

    • Monday – Friday, 7 a.m. – 6 p.m.
    • Saturday, 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.
    • Sunday, 12 – 4 p.m.

Murphy Oakley Community Center and Library – “Food Scrap Bin Shelters” on the east side of the parking lot

749 Fairview Road, Asheville

    • Dawn – Dusk

 

Buncombe County Landfill – Convenience Center85 Panther Branch Road, Alexander

        • Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
        • Saturday, 8 a.m. – 12:30 pm
Friends of the South Buncombe Library Book Sale
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
South Buncombe Library

The Friends of the South Buncombe Library are pleased to announce their first live, in-person book sale of 2023!  We will have thousands of books in fiction and non-fiction at bargain prices, in every genre and for every age group.

Prices have changed since our last sale, but are still a bargain: most adult hardbacks are $2.00 and paperbacks are $1.00.  Children’s items are still just $1.00 & 50¢!  And all movies and music are $1.00.

Proceeds benefit your library in so many ways: purchasing library supplies and equipment, newspapers, and large print books; providing children’s programs; and improving the grounds.

Sale Hours: 10am-4pm Friday and Saturday, with 10am-12pm on Friday reserved for Friends of the Library members.  Not a member?  We’re happy to sign you up at the door; the minimum donation is just $10.00.

AV material and children’s book bag sale on the last hour of business Saturday, if supplies allow!

Special Collections Returns to Regular Schedule
Feb 3 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Pack Memorial Library

After a temporary shift in operating hours, Buncombe County Special Collections (BCSC) at Pack Memorial Library will return to regular service hours beginning Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023. We look forward to welcoming the public back on a more regular basis.

The new hours will be:

  • Sunday & Monday – Closed
  • Tuesday – 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Wednesday – 10 a.m.- 6 p.m.
  • Thursday – 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Friday – 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
  • Saturday – 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Follow the Special Collections blog to stay up to date on current events and news from our Special Collections library.

Colby Caldwell: lanmarks
Feb 3 @ 11:00 am – Feb 18 @ 5:00 pm
Tracey Morgan Gallery

Tracey Morgan Gallery is pleased to present landmarks, an exhibition of new work by photographer Colby Caldwell. On view are large-scale, wax coated color photographic prints of elements from the natural world abstracted by digital interventions. Paired with these are small, meditative photographs taken from the forest floor of bright skies framed by treetops.

In his most recent work, Caldwell explores the forests of the Blue Ridge Mountains collecting what could be thought of as visual “field recordings.” Using a flatbed scanner as a makeshift camera, Caldwell documents what he encounters on his wanderings: decomposing leaves, moss, lichen, tree bark. The resulting images are punctuated by digital interferences – unnatural hues of pinks, reds, and greens, swaths of pixilation, and large streaks where the scanner attempts and fails to “accurately” record information. Caldwell asks us to examine often overlooked details from the forest floor in a new view, not shying from the digital idiosyncrasies inherent in the process of scanning 3-dimensional objects on a flat surface.

Where much of Caldwell’s previous work has included bringing nature into his studio, this series flips the script in a unique examination of technology’s place in the natural world. The work pushes at the parameters of traditional, photo historical nature specimen documentation. Caldwell is less interested in precisely cataloging samples, and more interested in investigating which tools we use to do so.

The work additionally looks at how history is held within the landscape, and the ways humans have appropriated the land, contested its ownership, and used it for sustenance. Caldwell’s unconventional, experimental methodology of documentation seems to be pointing to the many ways these histories have been obscured, and the way our connection to nature has changed in the contemporary digital era.

Colby Caldwell (American, born 1965), once a student of history, has tested virtually every avenue of the personal uses of photography as an instrument of memory. While his early work replicated the theatrical feeling of 19th Century “drawing with light,” his most recent efforts deconstruct the very elements of digital photography. Caldwell has held teaching positions at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, DC; St. Mary’s College of Maryland; and currently at Warren Wilson College, Swannanoa, NC. His work is included in the collections of The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, TX; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington DC; and the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans, LA. Caldwell received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Corcoran College of Art + Design in 1990. Recent solo exhibitions include Selu Songs at the Radford Art Museum in early 2022. He was featured in the book Art of the State, published November 2022, which surveys contemporary art in his home state of North Carolina. He currently lives and works in Asheville, NC.

Saturday, February 4, 2023
2023 Food Vendor Application for ADA Events Now Available
Feb 4 all-day
online

The application to be a food vendor at our events is now available. We’re seeking vendors for Downtown After 5, the Independence Day Celebration and Asheville Oktoberfest.

Click here to fill out the application. Application deadline is Friday, February 10.

Asheville Outlets to Host Food Is Love Food Donation Drive for MANNA FoodBank
Feb 4 all-day
Asheville Outlets

Asheville Outlets will again team with MANNA FoodBank to hold a Food is Love Food Donation Drive during the month of February 2023. The drive will focus on collecting healthy, nonperishable foods for distribution to those in need in western North Carolina. Items of need include low-sodium canned vegetables, canned tuna and chicken, low salt nuts, no sugar added fruits, shelf stable milk, whole grain pasta, brown rice, oatmeal, canola & olive oil, peanut butter, low sodium soups, canned and dried beans, and low sugar cereals Collection bins will be in the Asheville Outlets food court. Monetary donations can be made at MANNAFoodBank.org. For more information, visit ShopAshevilleOutlets.com.

Celebrate Black Legacy Month
Feb 4 all-day
Buncombe County Libraires

Join us throughout February as we celebrate Black Legacy Month with programs and events for all ages! In addition to the programs listed below, we will have special story times and exhibits at most of our libraries.

  • Bright Star Touring Theatre: African Folktales – February 1 at 4pm at the Weaverville Library (for children ages 3 and up)
  • Book Club: Jazz by Toni Morrison – Thursday, February 2 a 3pm at the Weaverville Library
  • Book Club: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett – Tuesday, February 7 at 6pm
  • Book Club: The Personal Librarian by Marie Benedict Tuesday, February 14 at 1pm at the Leicester Library
  • Book Club: Life in Motion: An Unlikely Ballerina by Misty Copeland – February 16 at 2:30pm at the Skyland/South Buncombe Library
  • Book Club: The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett – February 21 at 7pm at the Fairview Library
  • Black Experience Book Club: The Furrows by Namwali Serpell – February 23 at 6:30pm at the Noir Collective, co-sponsored by the East Asheville library

Drop by your local library and check us out. Email or call if you have any questions.

Our librarians have also put together a Black Legacy Month reading list for all ages.

Black Legacy Month Reading List 2023

Books for Adults

Adult Fiction

  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
  • On Girlhood: 15 Stories from the Well-Read Black Girl Library edited by Glory Edim
  • What the Fireflies Knew by Kai Harries
  • Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James
  • The Love Songs of W.E.B. Dubois by Honoree Fannone Jeffers
  • How Long ‘Til Black Future Month? by N.K. Jemison
  • Deacon King Kong by James McBride
  • Take My Hand by Dolen Perkins-Valdez
  • Black Bottom Saints by Alice Randall
  • The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb
  • Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead
  • Seven Days in June by Tia Williams
  • Red at the Bone by Jacqueline Woodson

Adult nonfiction

  • Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man by Emmanuel Acho
  • Carefree Black Girls: A Celebration of Black women in Popular Culture by Zeba Blay
  • The 1619 Project edited by Nikole Hannah-Jones
  • Rest is Resistance by Tricia Hersey
  • Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby*
  • The Sum of Us by Heather McGhee
  • All That She Carried by Tiya Miles
  • Please Don’t Sit On My Bed In Your Outside Clothes by Phoebe Robinson*
  • You’ll Never Believe What Happened to Lacey by Amber Ruffin*
  • Counting Descent by Clint Smith
  • The Body Is Not an Apology by Sonya Renee Taylor
  • Here For It by R. Eric Thomas*
  • Koshersoul: the faith and food journey of an African American Jew by Michael W. Twitty

*especially good on audio because the authors read their work!

Picture books for families to share

  • My Heart Flies Open by Omileye Achikeobi-Lewis
  • Only the Best: The Exceptional Life and Fashion of Ann Lowe by Kate Messner
  • My N.C. From A to Z by Michelle Lanier
  • Shhh! The Baby’s Asleep by JaNay Brown-Wood
  • Curls by Ruth Forman
  • Fly by Brittany J. Thurman
  • Opal Lee and What it Means to be Free: The True Story of the Grandmother of Juneteenth by Alice Faye Duncan
  • Build a House by Rhiannon Giddens
  • Bright Brown Baby, A Treasury by Andrea Davis Pinkney
  • Born on the Water by Nikole Hannah-Jones and Renee Watson

Chapter books for older kids

  • Isaiah Dunn is My Hero by Kelly J. BaptistBlended by Sharon Draper
  • Ikenga by Nnedi Okorafor
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi
  • Tristan Strong Trilogy (Tristan Strong Punches a Hole in the Sky, Tristan Strong Destroys the World, and Tristan Strong Keeps Punching) by Kwame Mbalia
  • From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks
  • Black Boy Joy: 17 Stories Celebrating Black Boyhood edited by Kwame Mbalia
  • Freewater by Amina Luqman-Dawson
  • Operation Sisterhood by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich
  • The Door of No Return by Alexander Kwame

Books for teens

  • Quincredible by Rodney Barnes
  • The Legendborn Cycle (Legendborn and Bloodmarked) by Tracy Deonn
  • All Boys Aren’t Blue by George M. Johnson
  • You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson
  • Survive the Dome by Kosoko Jackson
  • Revolution in Our Time: The Black Panther’s Promise to the People by Kekla Magoon
  • Ain’t Burned All the Bright by Jason Reynolds
  • Bitter by Akwaeke Emezi
  • On the Come Up by Angie Thomas
  • Okoye to the People by Ibi Zoboi
Financial Assistance is Available for Septic Repairs
Feb 4 all-day
online

If you’ve been struggling to complete a septic system repair at your home, Buncombe County may be able to help provide grant funding. The Septic Repair Assistance Program (SRP) launched in November of 2022, and Permits & Inspections is still accepting applications through Wednesday, Feb. 15 to determine if homeowners may qualify. The SRP provides financial assistance to repair failing septic systems of qualifying homeowners who do not meet the income limit of 80% of Buncombe County Area Median Income($64,250 for a family of four). There is limited time to apply, and if you think you may qualify, please call 250-5360.

To apply for financial assistance, you must:

  1. Be a resident of Buncombe County and own and occupy your home.
  2. Obtain a septic system repair permit from Buncombe County Environmental Health. To request a repair permit, you must submit an application to Environmental Health. Once the application is received, an Environmental Health Specialist will make a site visit and evaluate the existing system, determine repair options, and issue a repair permit.
  3. Obtain bids from at least three septic system contractors. Once the repair permit has been issued, you are responsible for obtaining bids from at least three contractors. A bid is an estimate of how much the repair will cost. We recommend that you request bids from more than three contractors to ensure that you receive at least three of the bids in a timely manner.
  4. Complete a Grant Application form. This form requests specific information needed to determine grant eligibility, including verification of income.
  5. Submit the Grant Application and copies of three contractor bids to Buncombe County Permits & Inspections, 30 Valley St., Asheville, NC 28801 or [email protected]

For more information, please see the attached documents. Applications will be accepted through Feb. 15, 2023. Funding is limited.

Free Tax Help at the Library
Feb 4 all-day
various Buncombe County Libraries

 

AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, in cooperation with the IRS, NC Department of Revenue, Buncombe County Library System, and Council on Aging, Inc. will offer free tax preparations for taxpayers of low and moderate income, with special attention to those aged 60 and older.

You will need an appointment to speak with a tax help aide. At your appointment, you can drop off your tax documents and you’ll be given another appointment in about 2 weeks to pick up your paperwork and completed tax form.

How it works

  1. Pick up a tax record envelope and instructions at Black Mountain, West Asheville, Weaverville, or Pack Library during library hours.
  2. Complete the Intake/Interview Booklet in your envelope by answering all questions. Then sign and date the last 3 pages.  Place all your tax forms and any information relating to your tax return in your envelope.
  3. Make an appointment to drop off your Tax Record Envelope and meet with a Tax-Aide volunteer.

Schedule and appointments

Black Mountain Library

Mondays and Thursdays, appointments are available between 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

To make an appointment, either email [email protected] with your name and telephone number, or call (828) 669-8610 between 1:30 and 4:30 p.m. Monday – Friday. An AARP volunteer will contact you to set up your appointment. You can pick up a tax packet at the library. At your appointment, a tax volunteer will check all documents and give you a follow-up appointment to pick up your completed tax return and documents.

Pack Memorial Library

Wednesdays, appointments are available between 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

To make an appointment on Wednesday at Pack Library, email [email protected] with your name and phone number. An AARP volunteer will contact you to set up your appointment. If you don’t have access to email, the staff at the library can email AARP for you. You can pick up your tax packet at the library. At your appointment, a tax volunteer will check all documents and give you a follow-up appointment to pick up your completed tax return and documents.

Saturdays, appointments are available between 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

To make an appointment for Saturday tax help at Pack Library, email [email protected]. At your appointment, a tax volunteer will check all documents and give you a follow-up appointment to pick up your completed tax return and documents. This tax help is provided by UNCA. Saturday tax help ends on April 1 and there will be no tax help on February 18.

Weaverville Library and Weaverville First Baptist Church

Thursdays, appointments are available between 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

To make an appointment for tax help at the Weaverville First Baptist Church email [email protected] with your name and telephone number OR call the Weaverville Library at 828-250-6482 with questions. If you don’t have access to email, the staff at the library can email AARP for you.  An AARP volunteer will contact you to set up your appointment at the Weaverville First Baptist Church. You can pick up your tax packet at the library. At your appointment, a tax volunteer will check all documents and give you a follow-up appointment to pick up your completed tax return and documents.

West Asheville Library

Tuesdays, appointments are available between 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

To make an appointment at the West Asheville Library email [email protected] with your name and telephone number. An AARP volunteer will contact you to set up your appointment. If you don’t have access to email, the staff at the library can email AARP for you. You can pick up your tax packet at the library. At your appointment, a tax volunteer will check all documents and give you a follow-up appointment to pick up your completed tax return and documents in 1 or 2 weeks.

Tax help will start on Feb. 1 and end on April 15.

Bring the following documents and tax forms to your tax help appointment. Photocopies are recommended:

  • Photo ID / Driver License for Taxpayer and Spouse
  • Social Security Cards for Taxpayer, Spouse and ALL dependents
  • Prior year Federal and State tax return
  • W-2 (Wages), W-2G (Gambling winnings)
  • Amounts of Stimulus Payments you received (EIP-3, IRS Letter 6475)
  • Amounts of Child Tax Credit Payment you received (IRS Letter 6419)
  • SSA-1099 (Social Security Benefit Statement)
  • 1099-R (Retirement), 1099-RRB (Railroad Retirement Benefits)
  • 1099-Interest, 1099-Dividend, 1099-OID
  • 1099-B (Brokerage Statement, Sale of Stocks and Bonds), 1099-Ks
  • 1099-G (Unemployment and State refunds)
  • 1099-NEC (Self-Employment), 1099-MISC, PLUS itemized list of expenses
  • 1099-S (Sale of Home), 1099-C (Forgiveness of Credit Card Debt)
  • 1098- Home Mortgage Interest and Real Estate Taxes
  • 1099-T (Education Credits) PLUS Student Account Statement
  • 1098-E (Student Loan Interest)
  • 1099-SA and/or 5498-SA (HSA = Health Savings Account) PLUS itemized list of expenses
  • 1095-A (Health Insurance – Affordable Care Act, Health Insurance Marketplace)
  • Schedule K-1 (Form 1065)
  • Any other documents or information relevant to preparation of the tax return
  • Voided check for direct deposit of any refund to your checking / savings account
Get Your Go Local Card
Feb 4 all-day
online

The Go Local Card celebrates the interdependence of our businesses to each other, public education and to the youth in our community.

Our community values equitable educational opportunities for everyone and the Go Local Card is an annual fundraiser for Asheville’s city public schools.

Since inception, we have raised nearly $220,000 for our schools. This program connects 4,000 children and their families to a healthy local economy and locally owned businesses that support their school.

… and cards are available for purchase at any one of these businesses through Aug. 2023

Need Help With Water Bills? New Water Assistance Program Could Offer Help.
Feb 4 all-day
online

If you’re behind on your water bill or afraid your water might get cut off, a new resource might be able to help you. On Jan. 4, the Buncombe County Board of Commissioners approved more than $450,000 in federal funding for the Low-Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP). The initiative is aimed at preventing water disconnections and helping reconnect drinking and wastewater services.

The LIHWAP will be administered by Buncombe County-based Eblen Charities. The nonprofit will make payments directly to utilities on behalf of qualifying households. The program is slated to run through Sept. 30, 2023 or until funds are exhausted.

Eligibility requirements

Households that currently receive Food and Nutrition Services (FNS), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) or Work First services, or those that received Low-Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) services from Oct. 1, 2020-Sept. 30, 2021, are automatically eligible to receive this benefit if their water services have been cut off or are in danger of being cut off.

For additional eligibility information or to apply, please contact Eblen Charities at (828) 255-3066.

Sliding Scale Pricing for Spring Conference 2023
Feb 4 all-day
online

Screen Shot 2023-01-19 at 2.09.44 PM

For the past 30 years, the Organic Growers School Spring Conference has served as a gathering place for growers in Appalachia to connect, learn from one another, and deepen connections to land and community. The Spring Conference began as an entirely volunteer-run and free event and has expanded to support an organization of ten staff with year-round programming. As we have grown, we have experimented with different approaches to keeping the event affordable and accessible while also working on compensation for our speakers and supporting our growing staff. We encourage you to check out our recent blog post exploring this in more depth. This year, we are excited to be experimenting with sliding scale ticket pricing for the first time, and we wanted to take some time to explain how this works and why we decided to implement it this year.

Looking beyond scholarships

Over the past several years, we have started implementing different scholarship options. We have set aside around $3000 in our internal budget for scholarships, and we have increased our outreach to other groups in the area who have funding to support individuals to attend conferences. We also offer work-trade opportunities for people who are interested in helping out with our event in exchange for attendance. We have around 100 work-traders access the conference each year through these opportunities, but we have never used up our entire scholarship fund for the event. We know that there are many individuals in our community that we are not reaching through our scholarship opportunities. We began to wonder if scholarship applications were creating a barrier to participation and started researching other options, landing eventually on sliding scale as our preferred model.

How alternative pricing models address accessibility

The sliding scale model, which offers the opportunity for participants to select a price to pay for their ticket, meets several of the parameters we were looking for in an accessible pricing model. Most importantly, it is a seamless way for attendees to access the price that meets their needs. So many things are means-tested in our society, and it can be exhausting to justify why one needs a more affordable price point. While many of our community members need financial support, there are also members of this community who have more than enough to share and are excited about supporting their fellow co-learners. These attendees can select the higher end of the sliding scale, which will be set at a price to offset the lower price paid by other attendees. We trust our attendees to select the option that best works for them while also considering how their selection would affect the ability of other participants to access a lower price point.

Accessibility is a priority for OGS, and implementing it is a risk for us as a small non-profit, given that we rely on our large events like the Spring Conference to support our year-round programming and staff salaries. This will certainly be an experimental year, and if we are not able to secure enough income through sliding-scale registrations, we will have to rethink our approach to pricing. We trust that our community will be thoughtful in thinking about the value that this conference has to them and about what they are able to pay for at this time. Thank you for being on this journey of discovery with us!

 

VOTE in the first annual UScellular Black History Month Art Competition
Feb 4 all-day
online

Members of Boys & Girls Club of Henderson County created original pieces of artwork and the finalists drawings that you will find attached were chosen by Club staff.  The finalists’ artwork will be digitally displayed at UScellular’s Hendersonville location at 1900 Hendersonville Blvd.

The winners will be announced in March and prizes include gift cards in the following amounts:

  • $250 for 1st Place
  • $150 for 2nd Place
  • $100 for 3rd Place

The public can vote for their favorite artwork by going to newsroom.uscellular.com

Work out for free at Linwood Crump Shiloh Community Center
Feb 4 all-day
Linwood Crump Shiloh Community Center

Asheville Parks & Recreation (APR) recently renovated fitness centers at Linwood Crump Shiloh and Stephens-Lee community centers – and community members can enjoy use of cardio equipment, exercise machines, free weights, open gym time, and more through June 30, 2023. During this time, APR will waive membership and daily pass fees so more people can access the necessities for a regular fitness routine. Locals can sign up online or at either community center to receive a fitness center key fob that can be scanned at either location.

 

“Our team is committed to creating spaces in which everyone feels welcome,” according to D. Tyrell McGirt, APR Director. “We are in the community building business. The gyms and fitness rooms at these two locations are filled with everything you’d expect from other top-notch fitness facilities and dedicated to body positivity and accessible wellness. By waiving the cost to use them for the first six months of the year, we hope more friends and neighbors will be able to connect with each other and maintain healthy lifestyles.”

Work out for free at Stephens-Lee Community Center
Feb 4 all-day
Stephens-Lee Community Center

Asheville Parks & Recreation (APR) recently renovated fitness centers at Linwood Crump Shiloh and Stephens-Lee community centers – and community members can enjoy use of cardio equipment, exercise machines, free weights, open gym time, and more through June 30, 2023. During this time, APR will waive membership and daily pass fees so more people can access the necessities for a regular fitness routine. Locals can sign up online or at either community center to receive a fitness center key fob that can be scanned at either location.

 

“Our team is committed to creating spaces in which everyone feels welcome,” according to D. Tyrell McGirt, APR Director. “We are in the community building business. The gyms and fitness rooms at these two locations are filled with everything you’d expect from other top-notch fitness facilities and dedicated to body positivity and accessible wellness. By waiving the cost to use them for the first six months of the year, we hope more friends and neighbors will be able to connect with each other and maintain healthy lifestyles.”

Applications for CDBG, HOME and Housing Trust Fund
Feb 4 @ 6:00 am – 10:00 am
online

The City of Asheville’s Community and Economic Development Department is now accepting applications for CDBG and HOME grant funds, and for the Housing Trust Fund (HTF) for fiscal year 2023-24.

The Community and Economic Development Department manages and administers programs for Asheville and for a four-county consortium, consisting of Buncombe, Henderson, Transylvania and Madison Counties, that provide affordable housing, economic opportunities and other benefits for low-income residents.

The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and the HOME Investment Partnership Program (HOME) are federal grant programs through the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) which provide grant funds for eligible projects to create affordable housing for low-income households and support community development activities to build stronger and more resilient communities.

The City of Asheville’s Housing Trust Fund was created in 2000 to provide a source of local funding to assist in the development of affordable housing in Asheville. Assistance is available in the form of repayable loans at a low rate of interest.

 

How to Apply:

To download the CDBG/HOME application documents and instructions visit the Community Development Funding Programs page. The deadline to submit an online application for CDBG/HOME funds is February 3, 2023 at 12:00 noon.

To download the Housing Trust Fund documents, view the HTF policy and access the application,  visit the Housing Trust Fund webpage. The deadline to submit an application for the Housing Trust Fund is February 10, 2023 at 12:00 noon.

Questions about the CDBG/HOME application process can be sent to the Community Development team via email: [email protected]