Upcoming events and things to do in Asheville, NC. Below is a list of events for festivals, concerts, art exhibitions, group meetups and more.

Tuesday, July 27, 2021
Nominations for Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award
Jul 27 all-day
Online

NOMINATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE

2021 THOMAS WOLFE MEMORIAL LITERARY AWARD

The Western North Carolina Historical Association is now accepting nominations for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Originated by the Louis Lipinsky family and now supported by Michael Sartisky, PhD, the Award is a partnership between WNCHA and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee. It has been presented by WNCHA since 1955. The award comes with a $2,500 cash prize.

The deadline for submission of nominated works is July 31, 2021. Anyone with knowledge of an author who meets the qualification criteria may nominate the author for the award. To be considered, an entry must be a published work of fiction, nonfiction, drama or poetry and meet the following criteria:

  1. It must be a first edition work; revised editions of published works will not be considered for the Award.
  2. The publication date must be between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021.
  3. The author must be a native of western North Carolina or a resident of western North Carolina for at least twelve months prior to the closing date for the Award.
  4. An author may also qualify if the work submitted has a focus on or setting in western North Carolina.

 

Western North Carolina includes the Qualla Boundary and the following 25 counties: Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, and Yancey.

The Award Panel this year consists of: Catherine Frank, Chair, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville; Dee James, retired Director of the First-Year Writing Program at UNC Asheville; Tom Muir, Historic Site Manager, Thomas Wolfe Memorial; Gordon McKinney, PhD, former president, Appalachian Studies Association; Terry Roberts, PhD, Director, National Paideia Center; Jim Stokely, President, Wilma Dykeman Legacy.

Nomination letters must specify the following eligibility criteria:

  1. date of publication
  2. birthplace or residence of author
  3. setting of work

 

Nominators should submit a cover letter along with three copies of the work postmarked no later than July 31, 2021 to:

Wolfe Award Committee

℅ Anne Chesky Smith

WNC Historical Association

283 Victoria Road

Asheville, NC  28801

 

An awards ceremony and reception, in honor of the finalists and 2021 Award recipient, will be held in early December 2021.

The Association presented the first Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award to Wilma Dykeman in 1955 for The French Broad. The Award has continued to be funded, in part, by Mrs. E. Frank Edwin, a member of the Lipinsky family and for the last three years by WNCHA, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Board, both with support from Michael Sartisky, PhD. Other recipients of this prestigious Award include Robert Morgan, Gail Godwin, John Ehle, Robert Brunk, Michael McFee, Lee Smith, Ron Rash, Wayne Caldwell, and Terry Roberts. Sandra Muse Isaacs was the recipient of the 2020 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award for her book: Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and Its Cultural Continuance.

The 2021 Summer Learning Program: Tails + Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales
Jul 27 all-day
Online

Illustration of animals reading book.

Get ready to go wild at the library for our annual Summer Learning Program. Join us for Tails & Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales. We’ll have an activity sheet with lots of fun adventures for all ages. You can pick up a sheet at any library starting June 1, or download it HERE. Check our calendar to find our most up to date list of programs all summer long.

 

The 2021 Summer Learning Program is open to young people, preschool through teen, with books and activities for every age. All library programs are free and open to children of all abilities. Come in and see what the library has for you!

Vegetable Gardening: Harvesting Tips!
Jul 27 all-day
Online

Your vegetable garden is likely approaching peak production time—but when and how to harvest? Even if you are a pro, here’s how to make sure those caring for your precious crops while you’re away know when to pick!

What matters about harvest time?

  • Harvest stage affects flavor and yields:
    • Picking too soon not only reduces the amount of food your garden produces but also may mean missing that perfectly ripened taste—although not all vegetables lose flavor after picking.
    • Waiting too long definitely means missing the best flavor—think sweet corn turned starchy—and your produce actually spoils. Crops literally go to seed have accomplished their goal and will stop producing!
  • Factors that affect harvest and storage.
    • Warmer temperatures after picking can affect flavor—crops like peas and sweet corn that turn starchy, for example, need immediate cooling. Joseph Masabni of Texas A&M Extension, advises “harvest these vegetables early in the morning or right before you intend to use them.”
    • Not all crops benefit from refrigeration, however! And humidity levels and air circulation are important, too! If you’re not going to use your bounty immediately, some crops, such as garlic, dry onions, potatoes, and tomatoes are best stored only at room temperature, according to UC-Davis Post Harvest Technology specialists (see below). They also recommend that cucumbers, eggplants, and peppers be refrigerated only for 1 to 3 days and then used as soon as you remove them from the cold.
    • Advise those harvesting in your absence how often you check your crops, and which are most time-sensitive!

 Things to look for when you harvest

Harvesting takes more time than you’d expect—look carefully for items to pick amongst all those leaves and vines. This makes harvesting a great time to give your garden plants a quick check-up!

  • Size matters!
    • Jokes abound about baseball-bat-size zucchini, but squash aren’t the only crops that can grow out of useful size.
    • If you intend to eat fresh beans rather than saving them to use dry, the beans need to just start to fill out their pods. 
      These red noodle beans need picking!

       

  • Color changes are usually important, too.
    • Tomatoes turning red are an obvious example, but how red is the best time for picking? Maybe earlier than you think! Picking at the “breaker” stage rather than fully red means your tomatoes will continue to ripen indoors, taste vine-ripened, but won’t suffer sunscald, or damage from insects or birds. 
      Tomatoes will develop full flavor ripened indoors if picked once they begin to show some color.

       

    • Cucumbers should still be uniformly green, not starting to yellow. 
      Cucumbers are best picked green rather than starting to yellow.

       

    •  Eggplants should be purple (light or dark depending on the variety), but still glossy, not dull 
      Pick eggplants while the skin is still glossy.

       

    • Watermelons, on the other hand, should develop a duller, rougher surface and the spot touching the ground should be yellowing, not white 
      Ripe watermelon skin should be starting to dull and roughen and the ground spot turning yellow.

       

    • .Detecting defects may mean removing fruits before they take any more resources from the plant—think blossom-end rot on tomatoes or peppers—or harvesting while part of the crop is still salvageable—such as a nip out of an otherwise healthy tomato.
    • Damage may alert you to insect infestations—minimize or eliminate, by hand-picking the culprits—such as snails or slugs—or treating to prevent further damage—wash away aphids on greens or treating pickleworm infestations of cucumbers and squash with pesticides, for example. Learn which “bugs” you see are pests and which are helpful predators!
    • Harvest “helpers” will be more eager to volunteer if they pick at the right time—and you won’t find all your tomatoes gone despite their size or plants loaded with overripe items bringing production to a halt. Alerting you to any emerging problems is another bonus.

“Harvesting” spent plants?

While picking your crops pick off dead leaves, spent blossoms, and trim errant runners to keep plants looking good and productive. Knowledgeable helpers can perform these tasks.

In WNC, most vegetable garden plants are annuals, or treated as such, so when you harvest, evaluate when it’s time to pull the whole plant—it may be too risky to ask short-term caregivers to make this decision!

  • Is the plant diseased? If there are signs of disease, either do what you can to remove diseased portions, treat the problem, or remove the entire plant.
  • Is production slowing?
    • Review fertilizing or watering practices to improve yields. Most crops need an inch of rain a week to prosper—water established plants deeply once a week if rains are insufficient. Check your crops’ needs for fertilizer and the application rates recommended for the fertilizers you are using.
    • Extreme temperatures may interfere with fruit set or how your crops ripen. Be patient if better weather will solve the problem! Note, though, that spring crops that fade with high temperatures are long gone; so too, frosts will damage tender crops, so harvest these before freezing temperatures.
    • Once you’ve decided your plants have passed peak production, pull the plants and consider planting a fall crop. See the calendar below for all the crops you can plant in August for a bountiful autumn harvest!

 Article by Buncombe County Extension Master GardenerSM Volunteers

 For more information:

When to harvest specific crops: https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/extension-gardener-handbook/16-vegetable-gardening#vegetableharvestingguidelines

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/library/gardening/harvesting-handling-vegetables-garden/

Ripening after harvest:

https://gardenprofessors.com/ripening/

https://www.johnson.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/agent-articles/vegetables/harvest-ripen-tomatoes.html

Storing produce:

http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/files/230110.pdf

Planting times for WNC:

https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/western-north-carolina-planting-calendar-for-annual-vegetables-fruits-and-herbs

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator
Jul 27 @ 8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Blue Ridge Community College

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator Businessman's hand points up along graph line going up

Take your business to the next level.

A comprehensive business innovation program designed to assist for profit, not-for-profit and family owned businesses to take them to the next level of success and sustainability.

August 25 – December 15, 2021

Registration for the 2021 Program now open.
Registration accepted through August 23, 2021.

Blue Ridge Community College and the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce have partnered once again to offer the Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator, a five-month, ten-course program.

 

August 25, 2021
Business Best Practices and KPI (Key Performance Indicators) Checklist by Department Identifying Opportunities for Acceleration

September 8, 2021
Management and Leadership

September 15, 2021
Human Resources, Legal and Insurance

September 29, 2021
Capital and Purchasing

October 13, 2021
Competition and Competitive Advantage

October 27, 2021
Branding, Marketing and Sales

November 10, 2021
Customer Service and Information Technology

November 17, 2021
Business Logistics: Best ways to meet customer needs

December 1, 2021
Accounting and Finance

December 15, 2021
Business Acceleration Plan Presentation and Graduation

Sessions run Wednesdays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. except 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on August 25 and December 15, 2021.

Global Citizen Songwriting
Jul 27 @ 9:00 am – Jul 30 @ 5:00 pm
LEAF's Global Arts Center

Global Citizen Songwriting for middle school & older! Led by Melissa & Kayla Lynn McKinney of The Change and One Voice Project. Students learn to write lyrics, explore various instruments, dive into the world of music recording, and focus on what makes a global citizen.

Revolting Children grades 1-3 and grades 4-9 Theatre Summer Camp
Jul 27 @ 9:00 am – Jul 30 @ 3:00 pm
Asheville Performing Arts Academy

Revolting-Children-Facebook-1200x628-2.jpg

Separate workshops for students in grades 1-3 and grades 4-9

9-3pm Monday-Friday and Friday performance at the end of camp $300

Early and late care available for an additional fee of $50 (7:45am drop off and 5pm pick up)

Let’s explore musicals in which CHILDREN rise up and inspire social change! Matilda used her powers to get rid of Trunchbull with the help of the other REVOLTING CHILDREN. Annie escaped from Ms. Hannigan after spending a “Hard Knock Life” in the orphanage. The NEWSIES went on STRIKE and showed them all that they were the KING OF NEW YORK. There’s so much inspiration when you pay a little extra attention to these awe-striking stories. A really beautiful way of feeling that power bubbling inside each of us, in the big (and small) ways each and every day.

Summer Art Class: Fantastic Food (Grades K–2)
Jul 27 @ 9:00 am – Jul 30 @ 12:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Fantastic Food: Artists find inspiration everywhere! Students create a variety of artwork inspired by food using varied media, from three-dimensional fruit sculptures to two-dimensional paintings of doughnuts.

Please note:

  • Summer Art Camp is held primarily indoors in the Museum’s John & Robyn Horn Education Center.
  • Space is limited to small groups of students; face coverings, social distancing, and frequent hand-washing/sanitization are required.

Join the Museum for Summer Art Camp in our bright and spacious studio! Camp is offered to rising kindergarten through 12th-grade students. All classes are age-appropriate. Sessions include drawing, painting, mixed-media, and more. Enrollment is limited, and pre-registration is required.

Richard C. Karwoski, Breeze Hill series, circa 1983, watercolor, 22 1/4 × 30 inches. Gift of Richard H. Steinman, 1984.6.22. © Estate of Richard C. Karwoski.

Suzuki Strings Camp Ages 5 – 12
Jul 27 @ 9:00 am – Jul 30 @ 4:00 pm
Asheville Music School

Suzuki Strings Camp | Summer Music Camp Offering at Asheville Music School

Come join in on the magic, music and merriment of Hogwarts Camp of Violin and Musicality. We will have wand practice, a Quidditch game, field trip(s), as well as plenty of music making.

This camp is for string students with at least 6 months of experience on their instrument. But, we do have a new Harry Potter themed camp for very beginners, July 18-23! Scroll back up to learn more.

Learn more about Paul Stroebel in this exclusive interview!

*NOTE*
This is our fifth consecutive year of our Harry Potter-themed Suzuki String Camp celebrating what we love about the Harry Potter series and its correlations with music. AMS does not endorse J.K. Rowling’s recent comments, nor does our summer camp have any official endorsement, sponsorship, or affiliation with the Harry Potter franchise. This camp was created by AMS teachers for AMS students.

Tanglewood Summer Theatre Camp Ages 8-13
Jul 27 @ 9:00 am – Jul 30 @ 3:00 pm
Asheville Community Theatre

Sponsor-kidsTanglewood Youth Theatre has long been a successful and inspirational part of children’s creative education in Western North Carolina. Our theatre camp has been extremely popular and is well-suited for any young person interested in exploring the exciting world of theatre. Our faculty represents some of the finest talent in the area, and we are thrilled to have them at Tanglewood.

For each session, classes include acting, music, movement, film, and design. Each session ends with a showcase for family and friends!

For ages 8-13:

All camp sessions will meet 9:00 am – 3:00 pm. Each session will enroll up to 30 students total split into 3 groups of 10 students. Masks will be required. This summer, there will not be a final showcase for an audience of family and friends. Tuition: $275 / Scholarships available.

Guided Trail Walk
Jul 27 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
NC Arboretum

Hit the trails and learn more about the Arboretum’s botanically diverse forest with the return of guided trail walks in 2021! In response to COVID-19, new safety measures have been put in place to protect our guests, members, volunteers and staff: Walks will be limited to 10 people, including the guide, and all participants will be required to wear face coverings for the duration of the walk.

This free hiking program is led by trained volunteer guides who take small groups of participants along woodland trails and through a variety of forest types. Depending on the season, topics of discussion may include wildflowers, plant and tree identification, natural history and more.

Guided trail walks depart from the Baker Exhibit Center Lobby every Tuesday and Saturday at 1 p.m. through the month of October. Walks last 1.5- 2.5 hours and are approximately one to two miles in length, and as such are recommended for guests 14 years or older. Walks are held rain or shine, so all participants should dress appropriately for the weather.

Register In Advance

Space is limited and advance registration is encouraged. Pre-registered participants must check in at the Baker Information Desk no later than 10 minutes before the scheduled program to keep their spot. Unclaimed spots will be offered to other guests.

Guests may sign up for trail walks in the following ways:

  • Pre-register online
  • Sign up in-person at the Baker Information Desk.
Summer Art Class: Mixed-Up and Messy (Grades K–2)
Jul 27 @ 1:00 pm – Jul 30 @ 4:00 pm
Asheville Art Museum

Mixed-Up and Messy: Explore the messy side of art! Students experiment with painting, printmaking, and much more. Students explore different artists and how they use their messy styles to create art and inspire the world around us.

Please note:

  • Summer Art Camp is held primarily indoors in the Museum’s John & Robyn Horn Education Center.
  • Space is limited to small groups of students; face coverings, social distancing, and frequent hand-washing/sanitization are required.

Join the Museum for Summer Art Camp in our bright and spacious studio! Camp is offered to rising kindergarten through 12th-grade students. All classes are age-appropriate. Sessions include drawing, painting, mixed-media, and more. Enrollment is limited, and pre-registration is required.

Deacon Trust, Life Is a Landscape in Green and Gray, 2004, house paint on canvas, 10 × 10 × 1 1/2 inches. Gift of George R. & Olivia M. Shelley, 2006.03.02.20. © Deacon Trust.

COLLEGE STUDY HALL
Jul 27 @ 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Grind Coffee House

 Mon-Fri from 2-5pm. You have access to high speed internet, work space and HALF-OFF pastries when you present your college ID.

IMPROV (Virtual) Rising 5th – 7th Grades
Jul 27 @ 5:00 pm – Jul 29 @ 6:30 pm
Online w/ Flat Rock Playhouse/Studio 52

Picture

Unlock your imagination in this fun, on-your-feet virtual improv class! Students will learn to think outside of the box, collaborate, quickly develop characters, and build on a creative idea by saying “yes! and…”  Through exercises, improv games, and creative prompts young artists will learn to take risks, access creativity, gain confidence, meaningfully connect with peers, and discover the FUN in fundamental improvisation.

​​​​
REGISTRATION OPENS APRIL 19

Wednesday, July 28, 2021
Hillbillyland: Myth + Reality of Appalachian Culture
Jul 28 all-day
Online w/ Western North Carolina Historical Association (WNCHA)
Nominations for Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award
Jul 28 all-day
Online

NOMINATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE

2021 THOMAS WOLFE MEMORIAL LITERARY AWARD

The Western North Carolina Historical Association is now accepting nominations for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Originated by the Louis Lipinsky family and now supported by Michael Sartisky, PhD, the Award is a partnership between WNCHA and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee. It has been presented by WNCHA since 1955. The award comes with a $2,500 cash prize.

The deadline for submission of nominated works is July 31, 2021. Anyone with knowledge of an author who meets the qualification criteria may nominate the author for the award. To be considered, an entry must be a published work of fiction, nonfiction, drama or poetry and meet the following criteria:

  1. It must be a first edition work; revised editions of published works will not be considered for the Award.
  2. The publication date must be between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021.
  3. The author must be a native of western North Carolina or a resident of western North Carolina for at least twelve months prior to the closing date for the Award.
  4. An author may also qualify if the work submitted has a focus on or setting in western North Carolina.

 

Western North Carolina includes the Qualla Boundary and the following 25 counties: Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, and Yancey.

The Award Panel this year consists of: Catherine Frank, Chair, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville; Dee James, retired Director of the First-Year Writing Program at UNC Asheville; Tom Muir, Historic Site Manager, Thomas Wolfe Memorial; Gordon McKinney, PhD, former president, Appalachian Studies Association; Terry Roberts, PhD, Director, National Paideia Center; Jim Stokely, President, Wilma Dykeman Legacy.

Nomination letters must specify the following eligibility criteria:

  1. date of publication
  2. birthplace or residence of author
  3. setting of work

 

Nominators should submit a cover letter along with three copies of the work postmarked no later than July 31, 2021 to:

Wolfe Award Committee

℅ Anne Chesky Smith

WNC Historical Association

283 Victoria Road

Asheville, NC  28801

 

An awards ceremony and reception, in honor of the finalists and 2021 Award recipient, will be held in early December 2021.

The Association presented the first Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award to Wilma Dykeman in 1955 for The French Broad. The Award has continued to be funded, in part, by Mrs. E. Frank Edwin, a member of the Lipinsky family and for the last three years by WNCHA, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Board, both with support from Michael Sartisky, PhD. Other recipients of this prestigious Award include Robert Morgan, Gail Godwin, John Ehle, Robert Brunk, Michael McFee, Lee Smith, Ron Rash, Wayne Caldwell, and Terry Roberts. Sandra Muse Isaacs was the recipient of the 2020 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award for her book: Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and Its Cultural Continuance.

The 2021 Summer Learning Program: Tails + Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales
Jul 28 all-day
Online

Illustration of animals reading book.

Get ready to go wild at the library for our annual Summer Learning Program. Join us for Tails & Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales. We’ll have an activity sheet with lots of fun adventures for all ages. You can pick up a sheet at any library starting June 1, or download it HERE. Check our calendar to find our most up to date list of programs all summer long.

 

The 2021 Summer Learning Program is open to young people, preschool through teen, with books and activities for every age. All library programs are free and open to children of all abilities. Come in and see what the library has for you!

Vegetable Gardening: Harvesting Tips!
Jul 28 all-day
Online

Your vegetable garden is likely approaching peak production time—but when and how to harvest? Even if you are a pro, here’s how to make sure those caring for your precious crops while you’re away know when to pick!

What matters about harvest time?

  • Harvest stage affects flavor and yields:
    • Picking too soon not only reduces the amount of food your garden produces but also may mean missing that perfectly ripened taste—although not all vegetables lose flavor after picking.
    • Waiting too long definitely means missing the best flavor—think sweet corn turned starchy—and your produce actually spoils. Crops literally go to seed have accomplished their goal and will stop producing!
  • Factors that affect harvest and storage.
    • Warmer temperatures after picking can affect flavor—crops like peas and sweet corn that turn starchy, for example, need immediate cooling. Joseph Masabni of Texas A&M Extension, advises “harvest these vegetables early in the morning or right before you intend to use them.”
    • Not all crops benefit from refrigeration, however! And humidity levels and air circulation are important, too! If you’re not going to use your bounty immediately, some crops, such as garlic, dry onions, potatoes, and tomatoes are best stored only at room temperature, according to UC-Davis Post Harvest Technology specialists (see below). They also recommend that cucumbers, eggplants, and peppers be refrigerated only for 1 to 3 days and then used as soon as you remove them from the cold.
    • Advise those harvesting in your absence how often you check your crops, and which are most time-sensitive!

 Things to look for when you harvest

Harvesting takes more time than you’d expect—look carefully for items to pick amongst all those leaves and vines. This makes harvesting a great time to give your garden plants a quick check-up!

  • Size matters!
    • Jokes abound about baseball-bat-size zucchini, but squash aren’t the only crops that can grow out of useful size.
    • If you intend to eat fresh beans rather than saving them to use dry, the beans need to just start to fill out their pods. 
      These red noodle beans need picking!

       

  • Color changes are usually important, too.
    • Tomatoes turning red are an obvious example, but how red is the best time for picking? Maybe earlier than you think! Picking at the “breaker” stage rather than fully red means your tomatoes will continue to ripen indoors, taste vine-ripened, but won’t suffer sunscald, or damage from insects or birds. 
      Tomatoes will develop full flavor ripened indoors if picked once they begin to show some color.

       

    • Cucumbers should still be uniformly green, not starting to yellow. 
      Cucumbers are best picked green rather than starting to yellow.

       

    •  Eggplants should be purple (light or dark depending on the variety), but still glossy, not dull 
      Pick eggplants while the skin is still glossy.

       

    • Watermelons, on the other hand, should develop a duller, rougher surface and the spot touching the ground should be yellowing, not white 
      Ripe watermelon skin should be starting to dull and roughen and the ground spot turning yellow.

       

    • .Detecting defects may mean removing fruits before they take any more resources from the plant—think blossom-end rot on tomatoes or peppers—or harvesting while part of the crop is still salvageable—such as a nip out of an otherwise healthy tomato.
    • Damage may alert you to insect infestations—minimize or eliminate, by hand-picking the culprits—such as snails or slugs—or treating to prevent further damage—wash away aphids on greens or treating pickleworm infestations of cucumbers and squash with pesticides, for example. Learn which “bugs” you see are pests and which are helpful predators!
    • Harvest “helpers” will be more eager to volunteer if they pick at the right time—and you won’t find all your tomatoes gone despite their size or plants loaded with overripe items bringing production to a halt. Alerting you to any emerging problems is another bonus.

“Harvesting” spent plants?

While picking your crops pick off dead leaves, spent blossoms, and trim errant runners to keep plants looking good and productive. Knowledgeable helpers can perform these tasks.

In WNC, most vegetable garden plants are annuals, or treated as such, so when you harvest, evaluate when it’s time to pull the whole plant—it may be too risky to ask short-term caregivers to make this decision!

  • Is the plant diseased? If there are signs of disease, either do what you can to remove diseased portions, treat the problem, or remove the entire plant.
  • Is production slowing?
    • Review fertilizing or watering practices to improve yields. Most crops need an inch of rain a week to prosper—water established plants deeply once a week if rains are insufficient. Check your crops’ needs for fertilizer and the application rates recommended for the fertilizers you are using.
    • Extreme temperatures may interfere with fruit set or how your crops ripen. Be patient if better weather will solve the problem! Note, though, that spring crops that fade with high temperatures are long gone; so too, frosts will damage tender crops, so harvest these before freezing temperatures.
    • Once you’ve decided your plants have passed peak production, pull the plants and consider planting a fall crop. See the calendar below for all the crops you can plant in August for a bountiful autumn harvest!

 Article by Buncombe County Extension Master GardenerSM Volunteers

 For more information:

When to harvest specific crops: https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/extension-gardener-handbook/16-vegetable-gardening#vegetableharvestingguidelines

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/library/gardening/harvesting-handling-vegetables-garden/

Ripening after harvest:

https://gardenprofessors.com/ripening/

https://www.johnson.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/agent-articles/vegetables/harvest-ripen-tomatoes.html

Storing produce:

http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/files/230110.pdf

Planting times for WNC:

https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/western-north-carolina-planting-calendar-for-annual-vegetables-fruits-and-herbs

Virtual Exhibit: Douglas Ellington
Jul 28 all-day
Online w/ Western North Carolina Historical Association

Asheville’s economic and building boom of the 1920s created a rarified atmosphere unique within Western North Carolina.  Douglas Ellington is known as the architect who changed Asheville into an Art Deco showplace. With his ability to combine architectural styles he produced a series of one of a kind buildings—buildings which changed the face of Asheville—the City Building, Asheville High School, First Baptist Church and S&W Cafeteria. Douglas Ellington: Asheville’s Boomtown Architect presents a look at his iconic Asheville creations along with other buildings he completed throughout his career in other cities.

 

 

WINNER of a 2014 Griffin Award for Excellence in Education from the Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator
Jul 28 @ 8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Blue Ridge Community College

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator Businessman's hand points up along graph line going up

Take your business to the next level.

A comprehensive business innovation program designed to assist for profit, not-for-profit and family owned businesses to take them to the next level of success and sustainability.

August 25 – December 15, 2021

Registration for the 2021 Program now open.
Registration accepted through August 23, 2021.

Blue Ridge Community College and the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce have partnered once again to offer the Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator, a five-month, ten-course program.

 

August 25, 2021
Business Best Practices and KPI (Key Performance Indicators) Checklist by Department Identifying Opportunities for Acceleration

September 8, 2021
Management and Leadership

September 15, 2021
Human Resources, Legal and Insurance

September 29, 2021
Capital and Purchasing

October 13, 2021
Competition and Competitive Advantage

October 27, 2021
Branding, Marketing and Sales

November 10, 2021
Customer Service and Information Technology

November 17, 2021
Business Logistics: Best ways to meet customer needs

December 1, 2021
Accounting and Finance

December 15, 2021
Business Acceleration Plan Presentation and Graduation

Sessions run Wednesdays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. except 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on August 25 and December 15, 2021.

Woodsy Owl’s Curiosity Club
Jul 28 @ 10:30 am – 12:00 pm

This program’s theme is Slimy & Scaly Creatures! Children ages 4 to 7 will learn about local reptile and amphibians, exploring what makes them unique and different. Children will enjoy a story, fun games, hands-on activities, and a craft. All children must be accompanied by an adult. You must pre-register for this program. Click this link to register online. Prices: $5 per child (includes site admission fee + program fee) $3 per Adult (includes 1/2 off site admission fee)

Summer Animal Encounters
Jul 28 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Chimney Rock State Park

Join a Park Naturalist to meet some of our resident Animal Ambassadors.  Participants will learn what kind of wildlife inhabits the Park and their important role in the ecosystem.  You might even leave with a newfound appreciation for critters you once misunderstood.

Time: Weekdays only at 11am
Cost: Included with Park admission.
COLLEGE STUDY HALL
Jul 28 @ 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Grind Coffee House

 Mon-Fri from 2-5pm. You have access to high speed internet, work space and HALF-OFF pastries when you present your college ID.

Recovering Hope Peer Support Group
Jul 28 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
HOPE COALITION

Peer Support

Group meetings: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 2:00 – 3:00 PM

 

Please contact us for individual services at 828.388.7979, Option #2

 

Through the “lived-experience” of our peer support specialists, we will assist, encourage, empower and advocate with others on their journey to finding their own path to recovery. Recovery is possible but is not meant to do alone. We do recover together.

About Hope Coalition

Hope Coalition is a grassroots effort initiated by the Henderson County Partnership for Health in 2013 as a community collaborative to educate, evaluate, and implement evidence-based models on substance misuse and underage drinking in Henderson County by building capacity and creating long-term and sustainable plans that are action-oriented and focus on community level change. 

Diabetes and PCOS Educational Support Groups
Jul 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Nutritious Thoughts is offering two new educational support groups.  The Diabetes Education and Support Group is open to members of the community who have diabetes (Type 1, Type 2, or Gestational) and would benefit from extra education and support around this disease. The group will meet for an hour on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month from 6 to 7 pm at the Nutritious Thoughts office and will include a short education provided by Registered Dietitian, Margaret Ruch, MS, RD, LDN. The gatherings will also include plenty of time for peer support for members to help each other deal with the daily demands of life with diabetes.

 “I’m excited to be able to offer this group as there’s a real need for education and support around this issue that is so common in our community,” stated Margaret Ruch, MS, RD, LDN.

The second group is open to all those dealing with Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and looking for more comradery and assistance in navigating their relationship with food and PCOS.  This group will be led by Registered Dietitian, Katie Rhodes, RD, LDN, and will be held the 4th Wednesday of every month from 6 to 7 pm at Nutritious Thoughts.

Thursday, July 29, 2021
Nominations for Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award
Jul 29 all-day
Online

NOMINATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE

2021 THOMAS WOLFE MEMORIAL LITERARY AWARD

The Western North Carolina Historical Association is now accepting nominations for the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award. Originated by the Louis Lipinsky family and now supported by Michael Sartisky, PhD, the Award is a partnership between WNCHA and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Committee. It has been presented by WNCHA since 1955. The award comes with a $2,500 cash prize.

The deadline for submission of nominated works is July 31, 2021. Anyone with knowledge of an author who meets the qualification criteria may nominate the author for the award. To be considered, an entry must be a published work of fiction, nonfiction, drama or poetry and meet the following criteria:

  1. It must be a first edition work; revised editions of published works will not be considered for the Award.
  2. The publication date must be between July 1, 2020 and July 1, 2021.
  3. The author must be a native of western North Carolina or a resident of western North Carolina for at least twelve months prior to the closing date for the Award.
  4. An author may also qualify if the work submitted has a focus on or setting in western North Carolina.

 

Western North Carolina includes the Qualla Boundary and the following 25 counties: Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, and Yancey.

The Award Panel this year consists of: Catherine Frank, Chair, Director, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at UNC Asheville; Dee James, retired Director of the First-Year Writing Program at UNC Asheville; Tom Muir, Historic Site Manager, Thomas Wolfe Memorial; Gordon McKinney, PhD, former president, Appalachian Studies Association; Terry Roberts, PhD, Director, National Paideia Center; Jim Stokely, President, Wilma Dykeman Legacy.

Nomination letters must specify the following eligibility criteria:

  1. date of publication
  2. birthplace or residence of author
  3. setting of work

 

Nominators should submit a cover letter along with three copies of the work postmarked no later than July 31, 2021 to:

Wolfe Award Committee

℅ Anne Chesky Smith

WNC Historical Association

283 Victoria Road

Asheville, NC  28801

 

An awards ceremony and reception, in honor of the finalists and 2021 Award recipient, will be held in early December 2021.

The Association presented the first Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award to Wilma Dykeman in 1955 for The French Broad. The Award has continued to be funded, in part, by Mrs. E. Frank Edwin, a member of the Lipinsky family and for the last three years by WNCHA, and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial Advisory Board, both with support from Michael Sartisky, PhD. Other recipients of this prestigious Award include Robert Morgan, Gail Godwin, John Ehle, Robert Brunk, Michael McFee, Lee Smith, Ron Rash, Wayne Caldwell, and Terry Roberts. Sandra Muse Isaacs was the recipient of the 2020 Thomas Wolfe Memorial Literary Award for her book: Eastern Cherokee Stories: A Living Oral Tradition and Its Cultural Continuance.

The 2021 Summer Learning Program: Tails + Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales
Jul 29 all-day
Online

Illustration of animals reading book.

Get ready to go wild at the library for our annual Summer Learning Program. Join us for Tails & Tales – an exploration of wildlife and fantastical folktales. We’ll have an activity sheet with lots of fun adventures for all ages. You can pick up a sheet at any library starting June 1, or download it HERE. Check our calendar to find our most up to date list of programs all summer long.

 

The 2021 Summer Learning Program is open to young people, preschool through teen, with books and activities for every age. All library programs are free and open to children of all abilities. Come in and see what the library has for you!

Vegetable Gardening: Harvesting Tips!
Jul 29 all-day
Online

Your vegetable garden is likely approaching peak production time—but when and how to harvest? Even if you are a pro, here’s how to make sure those caring for your precious crops while you’re away know when to pick!

What matters about harvest time?

  • Harvest stage affects flavor and yields:
    • Picking too soon not only reduces the amount of food your garden produces but also may mean missing that perfectly ripened taste—although not all vegetables lose flavor after picking.
    • Waiting too long definitely means missing the best flavor—think sweet corn turned starchy—and your produce actually spoils. Crops literally go to seed have accomplished their goal and will stop producing!
  • Factors that affect harvest and storage.
    • Warmer temperatures after picking can affect flavor—crops like peas and sweet corn that turn starchy, for example, need immediate cooling. Joseph Masabni of Texas A&M Extension, advises “harvest these vegetables early in the morning or right before you intend to use them.”
    • Not all crops benefit from refrigeration, however! And humidity levels and air circulation are important, too! If you’re not going to use your bounty immediately, some crops, such as garlic, dry onions, potatoes, and tomatoes are best stored only at room temperature, according to UC-Davis Post Harvest Technology specialists (see below). They also recommend that cucumbers, eggplants, and peppers be refrigerated only for 1 to 3 days and then used as soon as you remove them from the cold.
    • Advise those harvesting in your absence how often you check your crops, and which are most time-sensitive!

 Things to look for when you harvest

Harvesting takes more time than you’d expect—look carefully for items to pick amongst all those leaves and vines. This makes harvesting a great time to give your garden plants a quick check-up!

  • Size matters!
    • Jokes abound about baseball-bat-size zucchini, but squash aren’t the only crops that can grow out of useful size.
    • If you intend to eat fresh beans rather than saving them to use dry, the beans need to just start to fill out their pods. 
      These red noodle beans need picking!

       

  • Color changes are usually important, too.
    • Tomatoes turning red are an obvious example, but how red is the best time for picking? Maybe earlier than you think! Picking at the “breaker” stage rather than fully red means your tomatoes will continue to ripen indoors, taste vine-ripened, but won’t suffer sunscald, or damage from insects or birds. 
      Tomatoes will develop full flavor ripened indoors if picked once they begin to show some color.

       

    • Cucumbers should still be uniformly green, not starting to yellow. 
      Cucumbers are best picked green rather than starting to yellow.

       

    •  Eggplants should be purple (light or dark depending on the variety), but still glossy, not dull 
      Pick eggplants while the skin is still glossy.

       

    • Watermelons, on the other hand, should develop a duller, rougher surface and the spot touching the ground should be yellowing, not white 
      Ripe watermelon skin should be starting to dull and roughen and the ground spot turning yellow.

       

    • .Detecting defects may mean removing fruits before they take any more resources from the plant—think blossom-end rot on tomatoes or peppers—or harvesting while part of the crop is still salvageable—such as a nip out of an otherwise healthy tomato.
    • Damage may alert you to insect infestations—minimize or eliminate, by hand-picking the culprits—such as snails or slugs—or treating to prevent further damage—wash away aphids on greens or treating pickleworm infestations of cucumbers and squash with pesticides, for example. Learn which “bugs” you see are pests and which are helpful predators!
    • Harvest “helpers” will be more eager to volunteer if they pick at the right time—and you won’t find all your tomatoes gone despite their size or plants loaded with overripe items bringing production to a halt. Alerting you to any emerging problems is another bonus.

“Harvesting” spent plants?

While picking your crops pick off dead leaves, spent blossoms, and trim errant runners to keep plants looking good and productive. Knowledgeable helpers can perform these tasks.

In WNC, most vegetable garden plants are annuals, or treated as such, so when you harvest, evaluate when it’s time to pull the whole plant—it may be too risky to ask short-term caregivers to make this decision!

  • Is the plant diseased? If there are signs of disease, either do what you can to remove diseased portions, treat the problem, or remove the entire plant.
  • Is production slowing?
    • Review fertilizing or watering practices to improve yields. Most crops need an inch of rain a week to prosper—water established plants deeply once a week if rains are insufficient. Check your crops’ needs for fertilizer and the application rates recommended for the fertilizers you are using.
    • Extreme temperatures may interfere with fruit set or how your crops ripen. Be patient if better weather will solve the problem! Note, though, that spring crops that fade with high temperatures are long gone; so too, frosts will damage tender crops, so harvest these before freezing temperatures.
    • Once you’ve decided your plants have passed peak production, pull the plants and consider planting a fall crop. See the calendar below for all the crops you can plant in August for a bountiful autumn harvest!

 Article by Buncombe County Extension Master GardenerSM Volunteers

 For more information:

When to harvest specific crops: https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/extension-gardener-handbook/16-vegetable-gardening#vegetableharvestingguidelines

https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/library/gardening/harvesting-handling-vegetables-garden/

Ripening after harvest:

https://gardenprofessors.com/ripening/

https://www.johnson.k-state.edu/lawn-garden/agent-articles/vegetables/harvest-ripen-tomatoes.html

Storing produce:

http://postharvest.ucdavis.edu/files/230110.pdf

Planting times for WNC:

https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/western-north-carolina-planting-calendar-for-annual-vegetables-fruits-and-herbs

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator
Jul 29 @ 8:30 am – 12:30 pm
Blue Ridge Community College

Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator Businessman's hand points up along graph line going up

Take your business to the next level.

A comprehensive business innovation program designed to assist for profit, not-for-profit and family owned businesses to take them to the next level of success and sustainability.

August 25 – December 15, 2021

Registration for the 2021 Program now open.
Registration accepted through August 23, 2021.

Blue Ridge Community College and the Henderson County Chamber of Commerce have partnered once again to offer the Mission Acceleration Business Accelerator, a five-month, ten-course program.

 

August 25, 2021
Business Best Practices and KPI (Key Performance Indicators) Checklist by Department Identifying Opportunities for Acceleration

September 8, 2021
Management and Leadership

September 15, 2021
Human Resources, Legal and Insurance

September 29, 2021
Capital and Purchasing

October 13, 2021
Competition and Competitive Advantage

October 27, 2021
Branding, Marketing and Sales

November 10, 2021
Customer Service and Information Technology

November 17, 2021
Business Logistics: Best ways to meet customer needs

December 1, 2021
Accounting and Finance

December 15, 2021
Business Acceleration Plan Presentation and Graduation

Sessions run Wednesdays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. except 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on August 25 and December 15, 2021.

TENETS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Jul 29 @ 9:00 am – 3:30 pm
online via Zoom 

People shaking hands


During this program, participants will learn how to manage a project by using the 5 phases of project management and several other critical topics related to being a successful project manager in any industry. Program participants will also learn how to lead small and large projects from initiation through close-out.
COLLEGE STUDY HALL
Jul 29 @ 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Grind Coffee House

 Mon-Fri from 2-5pm. You have access to high speed internet, work space and HALF-OFF pastries when you present your college ID.